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Small Questions v. 10102

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Maybe it would be better to phrase it as "Paramours are more accepted in Dorne than in other kingdoms"?

 

 

When he was no more than sixteen, Prince Oberyn had been found abed with the paramour of old Lord Yronwood, a huge man of fierce repute and short temper. A duel ensued, though in view of the prince's youth and high birth, it was only to first blood.

 

 

 

As they were crossing the yard, Prince Oberyn of Dorne fell in beside them, his black-haired paramour on his arm. Sansa glanced at the woman curiously. She was baseborn and unwed, and had borne two bastard daughters for the prince, but she did not fear to look even the queen in the eye. Shae had told her that this Ellaria worshiped some Lysene love goddess. "She was almost a whore when he found her, m'lady," her maid confided, "and now she's near a princess."

 

 

 

"I never had the honor to know Prince Lewyn," Ser Arys said, "but all agree that he was a great knight."

 

"A great knight with a paramour. She is an old woman now, but she was a rare beauty in her youth, men say."

 

 

 

"So do others," suggested Gerris Drinkwater. "Naharis, for one. The queen's ..."

 

"... paramour," Ser Barristan finished, before the Dornish knight could say anything that might besmirch the queen's honor. "That is what you call them down in Dorne, is it not?" He did not wait for a reply. "Prince Lewyn was my Sworn Brother. In those days there were few secrets amongst the Kingsguard. I know he kept a paramour. He did not feel there was any shame in that."

 

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We don't have any indication as to what color Varys's eyes are, do we?

Because it would skyrocket the Varys Blackfyre theory. :P

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Because it would skyrocket the Varys Blackfyre theory. :P

Should we assume that they are not purple since no one has remarked on them (at least that's always the counter to Ashara being Lemore)? Or since he from Lys, would The George be able to have someone just slip it in, like this, "Like so many from Lys, born high and low, Barristan recalled, Varys had purple eyes?"

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This is from the opening post. It is still conjecture that "master" in the north is equivalent to a landed knight, and GRRM has not mentioned a "masterly" rank from what I can find.

What should the answer to the question become?

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What should the answer to the question become?

 

If the question is "what is a masterly house?", then where are people getting the term "masterly" from in the first place? It has not been used in GRRM's text yet. Some people assume that the Tallharts and Glovers being Masters in the AFFC and ADWD appendices means they are not lords, but Lords Velaryon and Borrell are also described with the title Master.

 

ACOK: "If the king were in need of more men, he would send for them. Instruct your nephew [Benfred] that he is to remain at Torrhen's Square, as his lord father [Helman] commanded."

 

AGOT: "The northern lords sat opposite, with Catelyn and Robb facing her brother across the tables. They were fewer. The Greatjon sat at Robb's left hand, and then Theon Greyjoy. Galbart Glover and Lady Mormont were to the right of Catelyn."

 

ACOK: "Lords Karstark and Glover were raiding along the coast ..."

 

ACOK: "Thith ith their lord commander, Glover, and the one behind ith Aenyth Frey."

 

ACOK: "The first man through was the lord with the mailed fist on his surcoat. "Well done," he said. "I am Robett Glover."

 

AFFC: "I have shown Lady Glover every courtesy, and she swears her lord [presumably Galbart] will treat with me."

 

It is plausible that GRRM decide to make the Glovers and Tallharts a different rank in AFFC, but that is just a theory at this point.

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How long is the gap between the battle of the blackwater and Tywin Lannisters assassination? Could the water/lion be a lightbringer allusion(or whichever literary device is applicable in this situation)?

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If the question is "what is a masterly house?", then where are people getting the term "masterly" from in the first place? It has not been used in GRRM's text yet. Some people assume that the Tallharts and Glovers being Masters in the AFFC and ADWD appendices means they are not lords, but Lords Velaryon and Borrell are also described with the title Master.

 

ACOK: "If the king were in need of more men, he would send for them. Instruct your nephew [Benfred] that he is to remain at Torrhen's Square, as his lord father [Helman] commanded."

 

AGOT: "The northern lords sat opposite, with Catelyn and Robb facing her brother across the tables. They were fewer. The Greatjon sat at Robb's left hand, and then Theon Greyjoy. Galbart Glover and Lady Mormont were to the right of Catelyn."

 

ACOK: "Lords Karstark and Glover were raiding along the coast ..."

 

ACOK: "Thith ith their lord commander, Glover, and the one behind ith Aenyth Frey."

 

ACOK: "The first man through was the lord with the mailed fist on his surcoat. "Well done," he said. "I am Robett Glover."

 

AFFC: "I have shown Lady Glover every courtesy, and she swears her lord [presumably Galbart] will treat with me."

 

It is plausible that GRRM decide to make the Glovers and Tallharts a different rank in AFFC, but that is just a theory at this point.

 

I think people have gotten kind of hung up on the titles and affectations.

 

GRRM uses a simplified system of feudalism (3 levels: king, paramount sworn to the king and everyone else landed sworn to the local paramount) in comparison to the historical feudalism, with it's multitude of levels of nobility and pyramidal structure.

 

In Westeros it seems that a landed lorded regardless tiles or affectations of has all the rights and responsibilities of any landed lord, regardless of title such as Master of Deepwood Motte or Lord of Cerwyn.

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How long is the gap between the battle of the blackwater and Tywin Lannisters assassination? Could the water/lion be a lightbringer allusion(or whichever literary device is applicable in this situation)?

 My guess is about four months, because it's a little over three months between Blackwater and the Purple Wedding (first day of the new year 300), plus another three weeks between tribunal, trial by combat and scheduled execution of Tyrion.

 

Note that very little about time keeping and the calendar(s) used has been confirmed. It is guessed that they use a 24 hour time system (they make references that are associated with 24 hour time keeping like, the the hour of the wolf (the hour either between 3 and 4 am or 4 and 5 am).

 

Calendar wise we know they use a lunar calendar (1 moon cycle per month, 12 months to a year) and in total length it is close to ours, so the common model used is a 30 day lunar cycle which results in a 360 day year.

 

A solar cycle may or may not coincide with the 360 day, else wise that could explain why the seasons would not occur at the same month of the year, each year (but not the length of season) or would result in astronomical inconsistencies in the astronomical observations of the Maesters (whom do study astronomy). 

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How long is the gap between the battle of the blackwater and Tywin Lannisters assassination? Could the water/lion be a lightbringer allusion(or whichever literary device is applicable in this situation)?

About four months passed in between.

 

Edit: "for" was supposed to be "four"

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If the question is "what is a masterly house?", then where are people getting the term "masterly" from in the first place? It has not been used in GRRM's text yet. Some people assume that the Tallharts and Glovers being Masters in the AFFC and ADWD appendices means they are not lords, but Lords Velaryon and Borrell are also described with the title Master.

 

ACOK: "If the king were in need of more men, he would send for them. Instruct your nephew [Benfred] that he is to remain at Torrhen's Square, as his lord father [Helman] commanded."

 

AGOT: "The northern lords sat opposite, with Catelyn and Robb facing her brother across the tables. They were fewer. The Greatjon sat at Robb's left hand, and then Theon Greyjoy. Galbart Glover and Lady Mormont were to the right of Catelyn."

 

ACOK: "Lords Karstark and Glover were raiding along the coast ..."

 

ACOK: "Thith ith their lord commander, Glover, and the one behind ith Aenyth Frey."

 

ACOK: "The first man through was the lord with the mailed fist on his surcoat. "Well done," he said. "I am Robett Glover."

 

AFFC: "I have shown Lady Glover every courtesy, and she swears her lord [presumably Galbart] will treat with me."

 

It is plausible that GRRM decide to make the Glovers and Tallharts a different rank in AFFC, but that is just a theory at this point.

So then it is better if the question is removed entirely?

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Here's a small question:

 

Did the dream that Jamie had in ASOS while sleeping against the stump of the Heart Tree (right before he went  back to rescue Brienne from the bear pit) have any prophetic elements other than to alert him to ally with Brienne?

 

It seems like it had a lot of ties to the past (working through his "Kingslayer" reputation) and I'd think it had some present/immediate future elements (Brienne fighting for her life alongside him).  But can anything at all be gleaned from it for the long term future?

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Here's a small question:
 
Did the dream that Jamie had in ASOS while sleeping against the stump of the Heart Tree (right before he went  back to rescue Brienne from the bear pit) have any prophetic elements other than to alert him to ally with Brienne?
 
It seems like it had a lot of ties to the past (working through his "Kingslayer" reputation) and I'd think it had some present/immediate future elements (Brienne fighting for her life alongside him).  But can anything at all be gleaned from it for the long term future?

The reader should assume that the dream was inspired by Bloodraven since Jaime was resting on a weirwood stump.

Then BR, who sided with the red dragon against the brother he loved, sent Jaime's fallen KG brothers to hammer home Jaime's crime when he betrayed Aerys, notwithstanding Jaime's defense that Aerys planned to burn KL. Rhaegar reminded him that he left his wife and children in Jaime's hands. BR seems to be preparing Jaime to raise up Jon, Rhaegar's heir, as king.

And all for naught. They found only darkness, dust, and rats. And dragons, lurking down below. He remembered the sullen orange glow of the coals in the iron dragon's mouth. The brazier warmed a chamber at the bottom of a shaft where half a dozen tunnels met. On the floor he'd found a scuffed mosaic of the three-headed dragon of House Targaryen done in tiles of black and red. I know you, Kingslayer, the beast seemed to be saying. I have been here all the time, waiting for you to come to me. And it seemed to Jaime that he knew that voice, the iron tones that had once belonged to Rhaegar, Prince of Dragonstone.

Jaime I, Feast

Jaime identifies with the Warrior...

Why would Cersei need the Warrior? She has me.

Jaime II, Feast

And the Warrior protects children...

The Warrior stands before the foe,
protecting us where e'er we go.
With sword and shield and spear and bow,
he guards the little children.

Samwell II, Storm

Jaime wants to make good on his failed duty to protect Rhaegar's children...

"... So long as men remember the wrongs done to their forebears, no peace will ever last. So we go on century after century, with us hating the Brackens and them hating us. My father says there will never be an end to it."

"There could be."

"How, my lord? The old wounds never heal, my father says."

"My father had a saying too. Never wound a foe when you can kill him. Dead men don't claim vengeance."

"Their sons do," said Hoster, apologetically.

"Not if you kill the sons as well. Ask the Casterlys about that if you doubt me. Ask Lord and Lady Tarbeck, or the Reynes of Castamere. Ask the Prince of Dragonstone."

For an instant, the deep red clouds that crowned the western hills reminded him of Rhaegar's children, all wrapped up in crimson cloaks.

Jaime I, Dance

Jaime doesn't believe that Rhaegar has any living children. But the George strongly hinted that Jamie will be a kingmaker...

"They belonged to Criston Cole, who served the first Viserys and the second Aegon." Jaime closed the White Book. "They called him Kingmaker."

Jaime II, Feast

Perhaps Jaime will believe Aegon's claim? Here is a telling quote from Barristan on his path to redemption after taking Robert's pardon...

"That was when I knew that to redeem myself I must find the true king, and serve him loyally, with all the strength that still remained me."

Daenerys II, Dance

And here's Jaime telling Lancel what he thought of Robert...

"Robert was no true king."

Jaime IV, Feast

When he descended for the feast that night, Jaime Lannister wore a doublet of red velvet slashed with cloth-of-gold, and a golden chain studded with black diamonds. He had strapped on his golden hand as well, polished to a fine bright sheen. This was no fit place to wear his whites. His duty awaited him at Riverrun; a darker need had brought him here.

Jaime IV, Feast

Black on red... Blackfyre colors.

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Great analysis Lost Melnibonean.  

 

I think Jamie's defense to charges that he killed Aerys is a good one.  We've seen with Ned that "honor" carried too far can be bad things.  I think the same thing applies to oaths.  Faced with killing Aerys or watching the entire  city burn (and having to kill his father to boot), I can't fault  him for the choice he made.

 

Now the death of the children (and wife) is completely different matter.  To the extent that he could have at least tried to prevent those  and didn't, yeah, I think he was at fault.  I really don't know the time line though  as to when he killed Aerys and when Tywin's men killed the queen and the children.  But if he could have tried to save them, even at the cost of his own life or estrangement from his father I think he had a duty to do that.

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So then it is better if the question is removed entirely?

 

You could or you could change it to explain that the there is no difference in between the title "Master of" and "Lord of" in power and responsibility, and that the difference in the affectations Master and Lord is historical, and harkens back to how the house became lieges to their respective lords and therefor joined the kingdom.

 

The families that use the Master affectation are all ancient houses which retain claims that they once had sole control over and voluntarily swore themselves to the local lord without need of threat, in return the local lord legitimized the family claims (the Starks in the cases of the Glovers and Tallharts, and the Targaryens in the case of the Velaryons).

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Just for the record, no 1 ever notices Eggs eyes being purple, so people not noticing Varys eyes has a precedent. 

Um...

"Can I have a sword to run them off with? Egg asked. He had blue eyes, Dunk saw, very dark, almost purple. His bald head made them seem huge, somehow.

The Hedge Knight

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