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Rhaenys_Targaryen

Wow, I Never Noticed That v. 13

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What about twisted little demon monkeys?

 

I'm strangely comfortable with them. Also gargoyles.

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My copy of ACoK is loaned out right now so I can't get you the exact quote, but when Sansa has her "flowering nightmare" a few chapters later some of the imagery (getting stabbed repeatedly in the abdomen) strongly resembles the way Rhaenys was murdered. My take is that Rhaenys did indeed warg into Balerion when she died, and she made some sort of mental contact with Sansa, another potential warg.
 

 

Agree 100%

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I noted in another thread ( http://asoiaf.westeros.org/index.php/topic/134836-jon-snows-twin/page-3#entry7309250) the repetition of JonCon wearing a red wolfskin cloak.

Regardless of any theory that may be attached to Young Griff's identity (Blackfyre, A+J, etc), there is an assumed connection between Aegon and Jon via brotherhood.

Young Griff/Aegon is connected to red wolf imagery via JonCon. Jon Snow is connected to white wolf imagery via Ghost. Red and white are also the colors of House Connington - a white and red griffin fighting, or "dancing" as Jaime puts it. Perhaps JonCon will somehow cause conflict between the two in the future?

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Just noticed a little parallel in the Stark's:

The mad king arrested the son (Brandon), imprisoned him, ordered his father (Rickard) to come South to the capital. The father did go and both never returned home.

Joffrey arrested the father (Eddard), imprisoned him and ordered his son (Robb) to come south to the capital. The son did go, this time with an army, and both never returned home.

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I just started another re-read of ASOIAF.  I always find something new.  This time in Bran's very first chapter in aGoT...

 

I'm paraphrasing, but he thinks about Ned about to execute Gared and he thinks if this is the same person who sits by the fire and talks of the Age of Heroes and the children of the forest.  

 

But in a Storm of Swords when Meera and Jojen tell the knight of the laughing tree story, Bran tells them that his father didn't tell stories, only Old Nan did.

 

Anyway I thought this was interesting.

 

     Nice catch.  At first it looks like a disconnect by the author.  In thinking about it, however, I suppose Old Nan could have been the one telling the stories and Ned could have commented on the details afterward or joined in discussions with the children, but he never initiated the tales.  But this is still an interesting point, OP.  Thanks.

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Nothing ground shaking. I just realized, that Stannis and Daenerys are cousins and both stand in some way in the shadow of their older brothers Robert and Rhaegar.

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Nothing ground shaking. I just realized, that Stannis and Daenerys are cousins and both stand in some way in the shadow of their older brothers Robert and Rhaegar.

 

The second sons meme that is all over the book (starting with the Ned himself, and Jon/Bran, Tyrion and so forth). Only Dany happens to be a daughter :)

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Bolton had made a toast to Lord Walders grandsons when the wedding feast began, pointedly mentioning that Walder and Walder were in the care of his bastard son. From the way the old man had squinted at him, his mouth sucking at the air, Catelyn knew he had heard the unspoken threat.


Not the threat Catelyn thought it was, but a threat nonetheless... To ensure Walder remained loyal to Tywin and participate in the plot to betray Robb, and not switch sides again, at the last second.

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Arthur already told us House Dayne's words.

 

"And now it begins,” said Ser Arthur Dayne, the Sword of the Morning

 

Dawn begins the Morning, the new day after the Night.

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Stark means "strong" in German. So, House Stark and House Strong are, in a way, the same names.

I wonder if there is supposed to be or will be any sort parallel between a Stark and a Strong in the future?

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Arthur already told us House Dayne's words.

 

"And now it begins,” said Ser Arthur Dayne, the Sword of the Morning

 

Dawn begins the Morning, the new day after the Night.

 

Well that makes ''No. Now it ends.'' hold more weight than I thought.

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Stark means "strong" in German. So, House Stark and House Strong are, in a way, the same names.

I wonder if there is supposed to be or will be any sort parallel between a Stark and a Strong in the future?

 

I've sort of wondered about how Strong was translated into German, since all the names got translated for some reason. I think it's a coincidence, though, just like Fucking Hell.

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I only recently dawned on me that Sansa is covered with Sandor's cloak TWICE.

 

George said something in an interview that he likes to do things in threes.

 

First time subtle: (Sandor giving her his cloak after Tyrion tells someone to cover her up when Joffrey ordered her stripped and beaten),

 

Second time a little more clear: (he leaves her his cloak -this time bloody- after the Blackwater battle and she spends the night huddled under it and then keeps the thing.)

 

Third time- In your face.

 

 

I wonder if/ what the third incident will be? 

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