Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

LmL

Astronomy of Ice and Fire: the Language of Leviathan

Recommended Posts

The Winds will soon blow. We will have a lot more to armchair theorizing to do soon anyway.

They pushed forward the show premier by a month which hints at it giving GRRM more time to finish Winds. He is determined to reveal Jon's babydaddy in the books before the show does.

That may be another reason why the show has eight seasons, aside from it being such a success. 

I follow a lot of ASOIAF pages on facebook and they spoiled many things pertaining to the show during the leak period. I am wondering if I should unfollow them before Winds comes out. Being spoiled on the show is one thing, but to be spoiled on the actual books is something else entirely.

Look we can insert photos!the-winds-of-winter.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I agree with Dominus that Valyria is more akin to the Roman Empire, with their extreme hubris and enslavemtn of peoples in far off lands. The road building is a direct take from the Roman Empire. Of course the Roman system of slavery was far more humane than Valyria - in roman society slaves had several ways of rising out of serfdom, even holding land and becoming a citizen, whereas Valyria fed their slaves to the gristmill of the mines, more akin to Nazi Germany or Stalinist Russia. Of course the Valyrians had dragons and existed for five thousand years, which is unprecedented in real history. We should all be glad the Nazis didn't have dragons, you know? ;)

So, the other similarity between Rome and Valyria that many people seem to miss is that the Ghiscari Empire seems to parallel Rome's ancient rival Carthage, their war resembles the Punic Wars, and many historians have made the argument that Rome's success in the Punic Wars was the inception of its transition from Republic to Empire, much as Valyria's victory over Gischari begins Valyria's transition from freehold to slaving empire. I also wouldn't let Rome off the hook with its treatment of slaves. There was a period when slaves were better treated, and there were opportunities for urban slaves. However, the growth of the plantation system fueled by slaves brought in from conquest as the Roman Empire expanded, could be quite brutal. One should not forget Rome's mass crucifixion of slaves after putting down slave revolts.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great comments Durran D. I think you're spot on with the Carthage analogy. So perhaps instead of "far more humane," I suppose I should say "for the most part less inhumane" or some such thing. Rome existed for a long time, so as you say, there are different periods and localities where all of this was in flux. 

 

As for Valyria, there's no doubt that their slavery was the most brutal kind. Their client cities did pretty well, but for those taken into slavery... not so much. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×