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Lily Valley

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10 hours ago, wolverine said:

High school kids do not need to know how to do quadratic regressions by hand.  I have a math degree and have no clue how to do a quadratic regression by hand.  I suppose I am stupid though.

Pretty offensive that you can tell I am a terrible teacher based solely on the fact that I utilize technology.  Not sure how you can accuse me of creating a whole generation of incompetents because I think the a calculator can save time and be used as a learning tool in the right situations (for one, that is giving me way too much credit ^_^).  The funny thing is, I agree with some of the things you have to say.  It would be great to be able to go into more depth in many areas and really take the time to ensure greater understanding.  I also don't agree with calculator over use, especially at early levels, as I feel like it stifles comprehension and the repeated practice some concepts require to become efficient.  However, I do believe graphing utilities can be powerful tools for learning, if used appropriately, for demonstration to a class and by the students for exploration of functions.  I don't use "the spiral method" and our state doesn't do "common core" but our state does have its own standards.

I am sorry, but when you went to school it was massively different than it is now.  If I ever implied kids were "stupid" for not knowing how to do something my ass would be cooked.

There's also the fact that almost every good job out there requires people be able to utilize technology effectively.  Computer science should be a required course.  

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My 3rd grader had a project these past few weeks to build a survey, collect responses and develop a report with graphs and interpretation.  It's all pretty basic stuff but he did learn something about coherent survey construction (anticipating consistent choice structure across questions to allow analysis), platform choice (he ultimately produced printed copies for easy distribution to casual acquaintances, but he learned how to deploy on a simple on-line platform) and he learned how to build charts in Excel -- and last night he got a brief glimpse into his dad's unnerving depth of knowledge of Excel.

Over the summer, I'll revisit his project data with him and show him how to do some cooler analytics in Excel with multidimensional charts, regressions, etc.  It's good to give exposure as early as possible to good technology tools and more advanced ideas.

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7 hours ago, Iskaral Pust said:

My 3rd grader had a project these past few weeks to build a survey, collect responses and develop a report with graphs and interpretation.  It's all pretty basic stuff but he did learn something about coherent survey construction (anticipating consistent choice structure across questions to allow analysis), platform choice (he ultimately produced printed copies for easy distribution to casual acquaintances, but he learned how to deploy on a simple on-line platform) and he learned how to build charts in Excel -- and last night he got a brief glimpse into his dad's unnerving depth of knowledge of Excel.

Over the summer, I'll revisit his project data with him and show him how to do some cooler analytics in Excel with multidimensional charts, regressions, etc.  It's good to give exposure as early as possible to good technology tools and more advanced ideas.

Sounds pretty awesome for third graders.

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Isk, that's great.  I WISH my students had ever been exposed to something like this.

For my teachers,

I found this.  Lockheed Martin has money laying around for a lot of different things.  Please take their money for your classrooms.  I don't know how big the awards are.  I have to talk to our state wide organization (obviously) before I apply for a grant for our college.  I'll let you know how it goes.

For those of you who teach STEM at the college level, it's late notice, but the Heinlein society has a $1000 grant for 5 students in STEM.  Three of the grants are for women only.  All women who do not receive the "Ginny" award can be considered for the other two scholarships.  Deadline is coming up fast.

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1 hour ago, wolverine said:

Sounds pretty awesome for third graders.

Yes, it's pretty good for that age.  And all of the kids created and ran their own version.  I think the monthly projects they've been doing alongside regular homework have been well designed to draw out different skills.  For the first couple, I helped him practice his presentation to the class, and now he knows how to prepare and practice a presentation by himself.

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