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Lily Valley

Hugo time! Your packet is available! 2018

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22 minutes ago, Darth Richard II said:

5 of the 6 noms are parts of series though.

Yeah, but TLTL is more like the two halves of Blackout/All Clear. It was originally intended to be published as one book, but Tor decided to break it up into two parts.

 

Which just means that I wish Tor had published both parts in the same year, so they could have been considered as one work for the Hugo!

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17 hours ago, Darth Richard II said:

Isn't auto spell check wonderful? And let's be honest, if Ada Palmer doesn't win we're going to have to riot in the streets. :P

 

For the record the Liu and Anders ones are the ones i uh, did not like.

Quit talking about Liu.  I am still FURIOUS the Dark Forest got snubbed.  It was the best book of the trilogy.

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New World Fantasy Award Design Has Been Revealed

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Here is a statement on the new statue’s design from the World Fantasy Award Administration:

The Awards Administration wanted something representational that would reflect the depth and breadth of the fantasy field, from horror to high fantasy and all stops in between. Trees—good trees, evil trees, prophetic trees, harboring trees, forests full of demons, forests of sanctuary—turn up throughout art and literature from the very beginning. They represent life, strength, nature, endurance, wisdom, rebirth, protection; they symbolize the link between heaven and earth. In Christian mythology, mankind starts with the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. In Norse mythology, the entire structure of the universe is dependent on the giant ash Yggdrasill, the World Tree, which many Eastern European countries see as a home to the spirits of the dead. Indian mythology has the cosmic tree Asvattha, and there are plenty of fantastical trees in Greek and Roman mythology too, including dryads, the nymphs who inhabit trees, the Dodona grove of prophetic trees, and Argo, Jason’s ship, which maintained the magical properties of the tree which provided its wood.

The Green Man is a magical figure in many countries; druids are tied to the oak and the ash; some oak trees were thought to be oracular. Yews guard the entrance to the underworld, rowan keeps witches away. In Native American myth the hero Gluskap created humans by shooting an arrow into the heart of a birch. In Persia, the tree which grew from the decomposing corpse of the first human split into a man and woman, and the fruit became the other races of mankind. Buddha reached enlightenment under a Bodhi tree, which in turn inspired Robert Jordan’s Chora trees.

Trees bestride fantasy literature, from Roger Zelazny’s The Chronicles of Amber to Robert Holdstock’s WFA-winning Mythago Wood cycle, C.S. Lewis’ Narnia chronicles to Michael Sullivan’s Age of Myth cycle, the godswoods of Westeros in George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire, J.R.R. Tolkien’s Ents and Enid Blyton’s Magical Faraway Tree.

But not all trees are nurturing: it’s the treatment of a Chora sapling which begins a bloody war in Jordan’s books. Tolkien’s Mirkwood is as evil as its denizens and Weasels and Stoats rampage around Kenneth Grahame’s Wild Wood; J.K. Rowling’s Whomping Willow has terrified millions, while Patrick Rothfuss’ Cthaeh, lurk unseen in the branches of a giant tree in the fae realm. There’s the baobab tree in Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince, Ray Bradbury’s The October Tree, the apple tree in The Wizard of Oz, and many more.

Vincent Villafranca has encapsulated the worlds of fantasy in the branches of our new award, and we thank him.

 

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The nominees for the 2017 Arthur C. Clarke Award

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The nominees for the 2016 Shirley Jackson Award have been announced!

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NOVEL

  • Foxlowe, Eleanor Wasserberg (Fourth Estate-UK/Penguin Books-US)
  • The Girls, Emma Cline (Random House)
  • I’m Thinking of Ending Things, Iain Reid (Gallery/Scout)
  • Lily, Michael Thomas Ford (Lethe)
  • Mongrels, Stephen Graham Jones (William Morrow)
  • The Wonder, Emma Donoghue (Little, Brown

 

NOVELLA

  • The Ballad of Black Tom, Victor LaValle (Tor.com)
  • The Dream-Quest of Vellitt Boe, Kij Johnson (Tor.com)
  • Maggots,” Nina Allan (Five Stories High)
  • Muscadines, S.P. Miskowski (Dunhams Manor)
  • The Sadist’s Bible, Nicole Cushing (01 Publishing)
  • The Warren, Brian Evenson (Tor.com)

 

NOVELETTE

  • “Andy Kaufman Creeping Through the Trees,” Laird Barron (Autumn Cthulhu)
  • “Angel, Monster, Man,” Sam J. Miller (Nightmare Magazine)
  • “Breaking Water,” Indrapramit Das (Tor.com)
  • “The Night Cyclist,” Stephen Graham Jones (Tor.com)
  • “Presence,” Helen Oyeyemi (What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours)
  • “Waxy,” Camilla Grudova (Granta)

 

SHORT FICTION

  • “Animal Parts,” Irenosen Okojie (Speak, Gigantular)
  • “The Apartments,” Karen Heuler (Other Places)
  • “Postcards from Natalie,” Carrie Laben (The Dark)
  • “Red,” Katie Knoll (Masters Review)
  • “Things With Beards,” Sam J. Miller (Clarkesworld)

 

SINGLE-AUTHOR COLLECTION

  • Almost Insentient, Almost Divine, D.P. Watt (Undertow)
  • Furnace, Livia Llewellyn (Word Horde)
  • Greener Pastures, Michael Wehunt (Shock Totem)
  • A Natural History of Hell, Jeffrey Ford (Small Beer Press)
  • We Show What We Have Learned, Clare Beams (Lookout)

 

EDITED ANTHOLOGY

  • Autumn Cthulhu, edited by Mike Davis (Lovecraft eZine Press)
  • The Madness of Dr. Caligari, edited by Joseph S. Pulver, Sr. (Fedogan and Bremer )
  • The Starlit Wood, edited by Dominik Parisien and Navah Wolfe (Saga Press )
  • Those Who Make Us: Canadian Creature, Myth, and Monster Stories, edited by Kelsi Morris and Kaitlin Tremblay (Exile Editions)
  • An Unreliable Guide to London, edited by Kit Caless and Gary Budden (Influx Press)

 

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2017 Locus Awards Finalists

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SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL

FANTASY NOVEL

HORROR NOVEL

YOUNG ADULT BOOK

FIRST NOVEL

 

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5 hours ago, Contrarius+ said:

The Hugo packet is now available. Great packet this year!

It does seem a very good deal, at first glance it looks like there's about 25 full novels in it (all the Best Novel nominees except Jemisin plus entire series for the McGuire and Gladstone nominations in Best Series) as well as all the short fiction nominees.

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On 4/19/2017 at 5:26 PM, Darth Richard II said:

Well, I uh, did not like the first.

I hated the first. With the fiery passion of deflated bureaucratic aliens.

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Yeah, the Hugo packet this year is an extraordinary deal. Get on it. For $40 you're getting an enormous stack of ebooks. Novels, short fiction, related works, everything. I own/have read quite a bit of it already (bought Ninefox Gambit just a month or two ago in a sale) but still, it'll keep me going for months.

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1 hour ago, Darth Richard II said:

Blech,  my feelings on THAT book are already well documented. I am not surprised though.

Yeah, I'm disappointed by the Nebula results. But nobody asked me, and I don't get a vote!

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25 minutes ago, Contrarius+ said:

Yeah, I'm disappointed by the Nebula results. But nobody asked me, and I don't get a vote!

I have already prepared myself for giant Hugo award disappointment.

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