Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Iskaral Pust

March 2018 reads: share your latest books read

Recommended Posts

Just read Steve McHugh's new not-quite-Hellequin book, A Glimmer of Hope.  Lots of build up with not much payoff.  It also takes place before the last Hellequin book, but then will have a flash forward in book 2?  That is if I've read the reviews right.  Guess we'll find out in a few months.

Moving on to the new Hap & Leonard book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/23/2018 at 3:43 AM, Let's Get Kraken said:

Reading Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother in preperation for teaching in China. Maybe not having, or wanting, or particularly caring about children of my own grants me some kind of immunity to the radically polarized opinions that this book seems to generate, but I don't have particularly strong feelings either way about Amy Chua's methods.

Some of it is a little jarring, but it does give some interesting insight into the second generation Asian immigrant experience, as well as the contrast between Chinese and western parenting styles.

Sorry for the thread de-rail, but I've been teaching in China for almost 10 years. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions regarding my personal experience with Chinese students and their parents.

Another good read if you're China-bound is Peter Hessler's River Town which is basically a primer on culture shock.  He came over back in the 90s when the government opened up China's interior provinces to "foreigners," and blazed a the trail for for westerners. You won't go through 1/10th of what he did, but you'll be able to relate on some level to everything he experienced.

Back on track: I'm re-reading Sagan's Contact and really appreciate his attention to detail in how various personalities operate within the bureaucratic contexts of their respective bailiwicks.

Newest read is Jemisin and really loving The Fifth Season.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Tongue Stuck to Wall said:

Sorry for the thread de-rail, but I've been teaching in China for almost 10 years. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions regarding my personal experience with Chinese students and their parents.

Another good read if you're China-bound is Peter Hessler's River Town which is basically a primer on culture shock.  He came over back in the 90s when the government opened up China's interior provinces to "foreigners," and blazed a the trail for for westerners. You won't go through 1/10th of what he did, but you'll be able to relate on some level to everything he experienced.

I will keep that in mind, thanks! Which part of China do you teach in?

And actually River Town was the first book that I read when I started researching the expat experience in China. I'm reading another Hessler book, Oracle Bones, now, and listening to Deborah Fallows's Dreaming in Chinese.

Edited by Let's Get Kraken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just finished off The Conquest of Bread, by Peter Kropotkin. It makes a few interesting objections to Marx, but I can see why Marx ultimately defeated the anarchists in the struggle over nineteenth century socialism.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Finished 'Dagger and the Coin' and while I liked it, I didn't like it as much as Long Price Quartet. In general, I disliked most of the characters.

And Singh from the Expanse seem to have been heavily inspired from Geder Palliako.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/5/2018 at 4:21 PM, Lily Valley said:

I agree, but keep going.  The Stone Sky was incredible.  

Just finished Kameron Hurley's The Stars are Legion.  There is some HORRIBLE and DISGUSTING imagery in that book.  Mil-Sci and borderline horror.    Really liked it.

I had to put this down.  I just couldn't do it.  I promise I will try Baru Cormorant again though.  Currently reading The Rift by Nina Allen - love an unreliable narrator story.  It's one of my favorites of recent memory.  Also reading A Taste of Marrow.  It is, of course, great fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Started the Red Knight first book in the completed Traitor’s Son Cycle. Really enjoying the book. I have to wonder if @Happy Ent has read it as I would love to know his take on the portrayal of flora. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished N.K. Jemisin's The Stone Sky, which I thought was a good conclusion to the trilogy. I thought the final book continued to introduce some interesting new elements to the story with the inclusion of the Syl Anagist flashbacks which did a good job of both showing how the world got into the state it did and showing how some things don't necessarily change no matter how much the world might. I thought the finale came to an appropriate conclusion, although I might have preferred a few more scenes between Essun and Nassun. I think it was a great series overall, the experiences the characters go through are so different to anything we might have experienced that it could have been difficult to relate to them but I think Jemisin still manages to make them compelling and believable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, unJon said:

Started the Red Knight first book in the completed Traitor’s Son Cycle. Really enjoying the book. I have to wonder if @Happy Ent has read it as I would love to know his take on the portrayal of flora. 

I'm about 2/3 through this, and while my copy is about 630 pages I swear it's got a really dense word count.  Book is taking a surprisingly long time to finish.  Looking forward to checking out the thread when I'm done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Geoffrey Wawro's A Mad Catastrophe: The Outbreak of World War I and the Collapse of the Habsburg Empire. Primarily a military history of the Eastern and Balkan Front in 1914 to early 1915 from the Austro-Hungarian perspective, with a brief detailing of politics and conflicts from the defeat in the Austro-Prussian War of 1866 to the Balkan Wars and the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and the July Crisis leading to World War I. Wawro didn't pull any punches when chastising the leaders of the Austro-Hungarian Empire from  Franz Joseph to Conrad von Hoetzendorf. The levels of delusion and incompetence are truly remarkable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*Attempted to post yesterday, but didn't go through*

Finished Second Foundation by Isaac Asimov on Thursday and it was a good as the first book of the original trilogy, especially as the "meh" of Foundation and Empire.

I finished The Seven Secrets of Somewhere Lake by Sam Campbell, the seventh book of his Living Forest series, and found it as enjoyable as the first six.

I started Snuff by Terry Pratchett as part of my read through of Discworld, somewhat sad that this is the last Vimes book and I have only two more in the series after this book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/28/2018 at 2:14 PM, Mlle. Zabzie said:

I had to put this down.  I just couldn't do it.  I promise I will try Baru Cormorant again though.  Currently reading The Rift by Nina Allen - love an unreliable narrator story.  It's one of my favorites of recent memory.  Also reading A Taste of Marrow.  It is, of course, great fun.

Nina Allen is some one I stumbled upon and am I ever glad I did. I have a tendency to glom onto a writer and read everything they wrote once I do so. Damn but she is good. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/29/2018 at 8:58 PM, Triskele said:

I'm about 2/3 through this, and while my copy is about 630 pages I swear it's got a really dense word count.  Book is taking a surprisingly long time to finish.  Looking forward to checking out the thread when I'm done.

I found Red Knight choppy and very slow going at first and then something kind of clicked and it flowed along.  But I can't think of anything I've read recently that packs in as much meaningful detail about the world and the rhythms of life--Cameron's re-enactor background really shows there.   You know he's actually worked out all of those distances and logistics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 3/7/2018 at 4:45 AM, ljkeane said:

Recently I've read Iron Gold by Pierce Brown, which was a little more downbeat than I was expecting.

I enjoyed Red Rising and the rest of the novels. Since I haven't read them in a while, should I look at a re-read before picking up Iron Gold, or were you able to hop right into it?

Edit: Didn't see a Pierce Brown thread to peruse.

Edited by redjako

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, redjako said:

I enjoyed Red Rising and the rest of the novels. Since I haven't read them in a while, should I look at a re-read before picking up Iron Gold, or were you able to hop right into it?

Edit: Didn't see a Pierce Brown thread to peruse.

No re-read needed.  The story picks up ten years later.  If you remember a rough outline, that’s enough. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reading The Long Price Qaurtet for the first time. Really good series. But also really frustrating because (as far as I can tell) the series isn't tremendously popular and copies of the books are very hard to get hold of. I'm afraid I'll end up getting spoiled as I search for the books.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/7/2018 at 1:08 PM, Kyoshi said:

Reading The Long Price Qaurtet for the first time. Really good series. But also really frustrating because (as far as I can tell) the series isn't tremendously popular and copies of the books are very hard to get hold of. I'm afraid I'll end up getting spoiled as I search for the books.

You might be forced to go the ebook route if physical copies are unavailable, small price to pay for not being spoilt.. These books will reward you for any investment of time you make.. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×