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S John

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15 hours ago, Xray the Enforcer said:

Do you have any contact with your boss's boss?

It's touchy.  This location I'm at has been essentially an upward escalator for folks here, some for 10+.  The current GM was an manager who moved up to operations director when his director moved into the gm slot because the gm was promoted to DM. Then he was proted to gm when the DM was promoted to RVP and and the gm who replaced him, repleaced him again as the district manager.  Same to be said for the other operations directors currently, including my boss.

They're very intertwined and it is difficult to speak to anyone higher about it because of that history.

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I'm certainly also in the market for resume touch-up ideas.  Some of these openings I've applied for have still resulted in no hits so far, and on paper they seem like positions for which I'd be a good fit.  One just never knows, but I wonder if my resume's format or language is wanting in comparison to the experience that's on there.  

ETA:  Well holy shit.   Not five minutes after posting this I received a note about someone wanting to schedule a phone interview.  

Edited by Triskele

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Had a follow up this morning, asking salary requirements.  Even after giving them, was asked to.come in for a second interview next week...

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31 minutes ago, Jaxom 1974 said:

Had a follow up this morning, asking salary requirements.  Even after giving them, was asked to.come in for a second interview next week...

That sounds like the best possible news at this juncture?

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54 minutes ago, Triskele said:

That sounds like the best possible news at this juncture?

Seems to be. But I'm waiting for another shoe to drop...

 

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Getting some much needed experience doing a couple of one week placements. Two at different law firms, one on the legal team of a housing association.should be good, despite the hoops I’ve had to jump through to get the people from the last one to answer my emails. Anyone got advice on making the most of short work experience placements? Want to get as much as I can from this

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I'm currently interviewing for a job with a good friend of mine in the Cyber Security field, a field that I have no practical experience in. The role is relatively senior in a major bank and is in another country. I'm excited at the opportunity to learn a new set of skills in a very hot field but I'm also scared shitless of the fact I know nothing. I've been talking to my mate about it for the last year so he's completely aware of my deficiencies but he understands my strengths pretty well and how it can be used to further the goals, something I also understand and can articulate. So there is something there for me but still kind of scary.

The two things holding me back though are that I just got promoted at work, so that's kind of awkward and I'm not sure the bank will pay what I'm asking for to make it worth me moving from NY to London again. I do feel pretty fortunate that I'm happy where I am and can easily walk away from the bank should they not match what I want but also know that if they do match what I want, I will have to live up to what they are paying. Been 7 years since I've interviewed for a new job (and a lot has happened in that time) so feel completely out of practice with all this.

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4 minutes ago, Mexal said:

I'm currently interviewing for a job with a good friend of mine in the Cyber Security field, a field that I have no practical experience in. The role is relatively senior in a major bank and is in another country. I'm excited at the opportunity to learn a new set of skills in a very hot field but I'm also scared shitless of the fact I know nothing. I've been talking to my mate about it for the last year so he's completely aware of my deficiencies but he understands my strengths pretty well and how it can be used to further the goals, something I also understand and can articulate. So there is something there for me but still kind of scary.

The two things holding me back though are that I just got promoted at work, so that's kind of awkward and I'm not sure the bank will pay what I'm asking for to make it worth me moving from NY to London again. I do feel pretty fortunate that I'm happy where I am and can easily walk away from the bank should they not match what I want but also know that if they do match what I want, I will have to live up to what they are paying. Been 7 years since I've interviewed for a new job (and a lot has happened in that time) so feel completely out of practice with all this.

If it helps, I also work for a major bank and they often hire people "off the street" based on potential, not existing skillset. Banks are very particular about their own systems and procedures, so they don't always want prior experience as that can taint the learning process.

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18 minutes ago, Ferrum Aeternum said:

If it helps, I also work for a major bank and they often hire people "off the street" based on potential, not existing skillset. Banks are very particular about their own systems and procedures, so they don't always want prior experience as that can taint the learning process.

Interesting. I would think in this particular position, skillset matters but who knows. The issue really comes down to needing a CIO waiver to hire me and that means my background will come under the microscope. Should be fun.

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Based on a conversation this morning, if the potential for this other job comes through, it just got a little easier to make the call...

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On 11/28/2018 at 4:13 AM, Xray the Enforcer said:

Thank you! and yeah, looking for format ideas beyond the traditional single-column reverse-chronology approach. 

For senior people, I prefer to see a format of:

(Optional) objective; could be type of role sought, or impact you want to make to a firm or the industry.  I don't use one of these but I think it's OK for a senior person to have this.

High level summary characteristics: tell me in 3-5 bullet points what are your key skills or abilities that you have measurably demonstrated.  This is the most important piece.  If someone does this honestly and sincerely, it basically replaces the entire remainder of the resume.  If someone bullshits and exaggerates, it will be immediately obvious from their actual experience or in the first interview.  Anything you put here has to be relevant and easily supported.  The top 3-5 also show your ability to prioritize and effectively self-evaluate.  No bloat.

Experience: usual reverse chronology but now you can exclude some of the qualitative description and instead record specifics like role title, responsibility, measurable results.  This should be more condensed than the average resume.

Education: a throwaway mention to your advanced degrees and many professional credentials because you take it for granted that someone with your demonstrated ability must have these.

Publications: include a convenient URL to a site that hosts links to all of your relevant publications, whether white papers published by your firm, interviewed by the industry press, academic papers, actual books.

(Optional): Volunteer/community activity.  I would exclude it, but I would not ding someone for including it.  Especially if the network effect is significant to their role.

This format might not be relevant for all industries, especially not highly creative ones, but it's what I would like to see.

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4 hours ago, Mexal said:

I'm currently interviewing for a job with a good friend of mine in the Cyber Security field, a field that I have no practical experience in.

I know a woman who ~10 years ago got a role as a consultant for a cyber security firm.  Her job is to lead the presentation of cyber security projects to paying clients.  She had zero knowledge of the field, her PhD was in English, she had very limited formal work experience, and she had never written a line of code, configured a network or even the slightest idea of how network security worked.  She read a dumbed-down-for-the-masses book on cyber security just before the interview (think "Idiots Guide to ...") and heavily implied that her PhD was actually in network security without being so crass as to tell any explicit lies.  She basically blagged her way into a job for which she has had zero knowledge or experience.  She has maintained the fiction all these years by successfully regurgitating the information from the specialists (who are useless at speaking to the clients) and by relying on the same chutzpah that got her the job in the first place, and by mostly focusing on the more relatable "soft" aspects of cyber security, like the psychology of phishing/spear-phishing/etc.  She still has no idea how to write any code or do anything with a network.

If she can do it, surely you can.  :)

 

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I had to lay-off three people in November.  Not because they are bad or useless people, but because they have been chasing a pipe dream for more than five years and never generated a single cent of revenue for the company.  It was time to close down that "business".  The guilt and stress meant I've barely slept in weeks.  Being a soulless corporate hack would be easier if you can suppress any vestigial soul.

 

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4 minutes ago, Iskaral Pust said:

I know a woman who ~10 years ago got a role as a consultant for a cyber security firm.  Her job is to lead the presentation of cyber security projects to paying clients.  She had zero knowledge of the field, her PhD was in English, she had very limited formal work experience, and she had never written a line of code, configured a network or even the slightest idea of how network security worked.  She read a dumbed-down-for-the-masses book on cyber security just before the interview (think "Idiots Guide to ...") and heavily implied that her PhD was actually in network security without being so crass as to tell any explicit lies.  She basically blagged her way into a job for which she has had zero knowledge or experience.  She has maintained the fiction all these years by successfully regurgitating the information from the specialists (who are useless at speaking to the clients) and by relying on the same chutzpah that got her the job in the first place, and by mostly focusing on the more relatable "soft" aspects of cyber security, like the psychology of phishing/spear-phishing/etc.  She still has no idea how to write any code or do anything with a network.

If she can do it, surely you can.  :)

This is basically me and the hiring manager knows it. It's one of the reasons he wants me for the job since we're going to be managing some external research relationships with DARPA, Israel, as well as internal relationships with different divisions of the organization. This is pretty much my plan. I like the confirmation that it can be done. 

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4 minutes ago, Iskaral Pust said:

I know a woman who ~10 years ago got a role as a consultant for a cyber security firm.  Her job is to lead the presentation of cyber security projects to paying clients.  She had zero knowledge of the field, her PhD was in English, she had very limited formal work experience, and she had never written a line of code, configured a network or even the slightest idea of how network security worked.  She read a dumbed-down-for-the-masses book on cyber security just before the interview (think "Idiots Guide to ...") and heavily implied that her PhD was actually in network security without being so crass as to tell any explicit lies.  She basically blagged her way into a job for which she has had zero knowledge or experience.  She has maintained the fiction all these years by successfully regurgitating the information from the specialists (who are useless at speaking to the clients) and by relying on the same chutzpah that got her the job in the first place, and by mostly focusing on the more relatable "soft" aspects of cyber security, like the psychology of phishing/spear-phishing/etc.  She still has no idea how to write any code or do anything with a network.

If she can do it, surely you can.  :)

 

I hope they make allowances for the wheel barrow that must be required to tote around her massive balls.  

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This thread makes it very clear that I need to go back to school. Having an undergrad in poli sci and psych seems to be absolutely worthless to most places....

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1 hour ago, Iskaral Pust said:

For senior people, I prefer to see a format of:

(Optional) objective; could be type of role sought, or impact you want to make to a firm or the industry.  I don't use one of these but I think it's OK for a senior person to have this.

[[snip]]

Thank you for the advice!! This is super-helpful and was where I was thinking of going with mine. I like the focus on results -- that's something I've noticed has been missing on the resumes that have come across my desk in the last year or so, even for higher-level positions. 

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4 hours ago, S John said:

I hope they make allowances for the wheel barrow that must be required to tote around her massive balls.  

Seriously, right.  I’m stilled so impressed she pulled it off.  I officially abhor her duplicity, and taking that job opportunity from someone who spent years learning their shit.  But imagine having the balls to even attempt it!?  And what if she tried the same trick for a job as a structural engineer or a heart surgeon or something?  Perhaps it’s better for all of us that she stopped where she did. 

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