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AncalagonTheBlack

The books coming out in 2019

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Posted (edited)

Right,finally got round to making this list :)

 

January

Dark Forge by Miles Cameron
Shadow Captain by Alastair Reynolds
The Hod King by Josiah Bancroft
King of Scars by Leigh Bardugo
Ship of Smoke and Steel by Django Wexler
Dragon Heart by Peter Higgins
Vultures by Chuck Wendig
The Gutter Prayer by Gareth Ryder-Hanrahan
The Winter of the Witch by Katherine Arden
Reckoning of Fallen Gods by R. A. Salvatore
Soulkeeper by David Dalglish
Tides of the Titans by Thoraiya Dyer
A Labyrinth of Scions and Sorcery by Curtis Craddock
The Iron Codex by David Mack
Unauthorized Bread by Cory Doctorow
Through Fiery Trials by David Weber
In an Absent Dream by Seanan McGuire
The Hanged Man by K. D. Edwards
The Fall by Tracy Townsend
The Heirs of Babylon by Glen Cook - Night Shade Books reissue


February

Kellanved's Reach by Ian C. Esslemont
The Raven Tower by Ann Leckie
Dark Age by Pierce Brown
The Blackest Heart by Brian Lee Durfee
Master of Sorrows by Justin Travis Call
The Sun's Domain by Rebecca Levene
The Light of All That Falls by James Islington
No Way by S. J. Morden
Firstborn by Michelle West
Terminal Uprising by Jim C. Hines
The City in the Middle of the Night by Charlie Jane Anders
The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon
Gates of Stone by Angus Macallan
In the Land of the Everliving by Stephen R. Lawhead
Miss Violet and the Great War by Leanna Renee Hieber
The Revenant Express by George Mann
Endgames by L. E. Modesitt Jr.
The Ruin of Kings by Jenn Lyons
Strife's Bane by Evie Manieri
Sisters of the Fire by Kim Wilkins
The Beast's Heart: A Novel of Beauty and the Beast by Leife Shallcross
The Ingenious by Darius Hinks
Where Oblivion Lives by T. Frohock


March

The Light Brigade by Kameron Hurley
Ancestral Night by Elizabeth Bear
Do You Dream of Terra-Two? by Temi Oh
The True Queen by Zen Cho
Storm Cursed by Patricia Briggs
Wild Country by Anne Bishop
A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine
Hearts of Ice by David Hair
The Rosewater Insurrection by Tade Thompson
Children of Virtue and Vengeance by Tomi Adeyemi
Luna: Moon Rising by Ian McDonald
That Ain't Witchcraft by Seanan McGuire
A Parliament of Bodies by Marshall Ryan Maresca
The Perfect Assassin by K. A. Doore
Creation Machine by Andrew Bannister
Titanshade by Dan Stout
Fray by Rowenna Miller
Sanctuary by V.V. James
The Everlasting Rose by Dhonielle Clayton
The Orphanage of Gods by Helena Coggan

April

Holy Sister by Mark Lawrence
A Time of Blood by John Gwynne
The War Within by Stephen Donaldson
Beneath the Twisted Trees by Bradley Beaulieu
Shadows of the Short Days by Alexander Dan Vilhjálmsson
The Spider by Leo Carew
Seven Blades in Black by Sam Sykes
Twilight of the Gods by Scott Oden
Storm of Locusts by Rebecca Roanhorse
Nest of the Monarch by Kay Kenyon
Inspection by Josh Malerman
Fire Season by Stephen Blackmoore
The Unbound Empire by Melissa Caruso
Lady Hotspur by Tessa Gratton
Atlas Alone by Emma Newman
Emily Eternal by M. G. Wheaton
Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle by George R. R. Martin
Waste Tide by Chen Qiufan (translated by Ken Liu)
Knight: A Chronicle of the Sibyl's War by Timothy Zahn
Amnesty by Lara Elena Donnelly
The Sword and the Dagger by Robert Cochran
No Country for Old Gnomes: The Tales of Pell by Kevin Hearne and Delilah S. Dawson
The Master of Dreams by Mike Resnick
Finder by Suzanne Palmer
A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World by C. A. Fletcher
The Girl Who Could Move Sh*t with Her Mind by Jackson Ford
Broken Shadow by Jaine Fenn
Pale Kings by Micah Yongo
Winds of Marque by Bennett R. Coles
The Luminous Dead by Caitlin Starling


May
A Brightness Long Ago by Guy Gavriel Kay
Empire of Grass by Tad Williams
The War Ship by Neal Asher
The Last Road by K. V. Johansen
Dragonslayer by Duncan M. Hamilton
The Shattered Realm of Ardor Benn by Tyler Whitesides
Electric Forest by Tanith Lee
Theater of Spies by S. M. Stirling
Five Unicorn Flush by TJ Berry
Time's Demon by D B Jackson
Shadowblade by Anna Kashina
The True Bastards by Jonathan French
The Last Astronaut by David Wellington


June
Crowfall by Ed McDonald
Blood of Empire by Brian McClellan
Kingdoms of the Cursed by Greg Keyes
Knight of Stars by Tom Lloyd
The House of Sundering Flames by Aliette de Bodard
The Bone Ships by RJ Barker
Lost Acre by Andrew Caldecott


July

The Wolf's Call: Raven's Blade #1 by Anthony Ryan
In Howling Dark by Christopher Ruocchio
Death Goddess Dance by Levi Black
Velocity Weapon by Megan E. O'Keefe
The Fifth Ward: Good Company by Dale Lucas


August

The Burning White by Brent Weeks
Where Gods Fear to Go by Angus Watson
A Blight of Blackwings by Kevin Hearne

September

World Engines by Stephen Baxter
The God Game by Danny Tobey

October


November


December


Tentative publication dates (Amazon):
New Joe Abercrombie Novel - April 16, 2019
New K. J. Parker Novel -  April 9, 2019
The Broken Heavens by Kameron Hurley - Dec 3, 2019

 

Unknown publication dates:

The Winds of Winter by George R. R. Martin
The Doors of Stone by Patrick Rothfuss
The Thorn of Emberlain by Scott Lynch
Endlords by J. V. Jones

Edited by AncalagonTheBlack

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Two interesting sounding books from non- English writers,one is a fantasy debut from Iceland to be published by Gollancz and the other is a Swedish historical crime novel set in 18th-century Stockholm.Details below.

Quote

Shadows of the Short Days by Alexander Dan Vilhjálmsson will publish in April 2019.

Gollancz is publishing a "genre-defining" fantasy duology by Icelandic debut author Alexander Dan Vilhjálmsson.

On frost-covered streets beneath the northern lights, a half-caste, guerrilla artist and an outcast, drug-addicted sorcerer will start a revolution.A strikingly original Icelandic debut set in a strangely familiar alternate Reykjavik where wild and industrialised magic meet.Perfect for fans of contemporary fantasy in the style of Lev Grossman's The Magicians or China Mieville's The City & The City

Sæmundur the Mad, addict and sorcerer, has been expelled from the magical university, Svartiskóli, and can no longer study galdur, an esoteric source of magic. Obsessed with proving his peers wrong, he will stop at nothing to gain absolute power and knowledge, especially of that which is long forbidden.

Garún is an outcast: half-human, half-huldufólk, her very existence is a violation of dimensional boundaries, the ultimate taboo. A militant revolutionary and graffiti artist, recklessly dismissive of the status quo, she will do anything to achieve a just society, including spark a revolution. Even if she has to do it alone.

This is a tale of revolution set in a twisted version of Reykjavik fuelled by industrialised magic and populated by humans, interdimensional exiles, otherworldly creatures, psychoactive graffiti and demonic familiars.

Shadows of the Short Days is set in a "strangely familiar" yet "alternate" Reykjavík where wild and industrialised magic meet. Billed as perfect for fans of China Miéville, Lev Grossman and Paulo Bacigalupi, it tells a tale of "damaged" characters forging a revolution against an oppressive government.

The book, the first in a new saga, was picked up from the slush pile by assistant editor Craig Leyenaar. He acquired world rights to two novels from Jennifer Jackson of the Donald Maas Literary Agency.

Author Dan Vilhjálmsson, who lives in Reykjavík, writes in both Icelandic and English, translating back and forth as necessary, and is the founder and editor of SFF magazine, Furðusögur (Weird Stories). He is also the vocalist and lyricist for an Icelandic black metal band called Carpe Noctem.

He said: "Signing with Gollancz and Jennifer Jackson has been an incredible turn of events for me. When I sent the manuscript in to the open submission I had absolutely zero expectations – it’s been a daydream come true. I am humbled and honoured to have signed not one but two books of the Hrimland Saga with Gollancz. I look forward to working with Craig and the incredible team at Gollancz on these weird Icelandic novels."

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Shadows-Short-Days-Alexander-Vilhjálmsson/dp/1473224101/

https://www.gollancz.co.uk/2018/02/13/slush-pile-success-assistant-editor-snatches-brilliant-icelandic-fantasy-debut-open-submissions/

 

.

Quote
The Wolf and the Watchman by Niklas Natt och Dag - Feb U.K./March U.S
 
A gripping debut novel immersed in historical noir. In this breathtakingly bold, intricately constructed novel set in 18th century Stockholm, a dying man searches among the city’s teeming streets, dark corners, and intriguing inhabitants to unmask a ruthless murderer—perfect for fans of Perfume and The Alienist.

Best Debut, The Swedish Academy of Crime Writers' Award 2017

The year is 1793. Over a year has passed since the death of Gustav III of Sweden and the nation is ruled with an iron fist by lord of the realm Gustaf Adolf Reuterholm. In the wake of the old king's passing, trust has turned into a sparse commodity. Paranoia and whispered conspiracies can be found at every corner.

A mutilated body is discovered in the malodorous waters of Fatburen Lake on the island of Södermalm. Missing both its legs and arms, the body has been disfigured beyond recognition. Though Cecil Winge of the Stockholm Police is himself marked for an early death by consumption, he takes on the case of solving the mystery of the Fatburen corpse. Cecil soon finds himself entangled in a web of dark secrets and boundless evil, a web with threads reaching all the way to the upper echelons of Stockholm society.

In his debut novel The Wolf and the Watchman, Niklas Natt och Dag paints a compelling portrait of late 18th century Stockholm, the frightful yet fascinating reality lurking behind the powdered and painted veneer of the era.

https://www.hodder.co.uk/books/detail.page?isbn=9781473682122

http://www.simonandschuster.com/books/The-Wolf-and-the-Watchman/Niklas-Natt-och-Dag/9781501196775

 

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Isn't Neal Stephenson due to publish a new book in 2019, called 'Fall'? It's meant to be a retelling of Milton's Paradise Lost, and was scheduled to be published originally in Q3 of 2017, but was pushed back for reasons unknown. 

(Borough Press is meant to be publishing it, if memory serves.)

 

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TIAMAT’S WRATH Coming in Spring 2019!

Quote

Fans of The Expanse: We know that you have been looking forward to TIAMAT’S WRATH this December. But because we are now entering the home stretch of this amazing series and we all want to make sure we get it right, we have asked the authors to give our editorial and sales teams some extra time to prepare for the launch.  

 The new publication date will be in March 2019. We know you’re going to love this next chapter, and thank you for your patience.

 

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Posted (edited)

The long-postponed publication of Ember in the Ashes, the sequel to Antoine Rouaud's 2013 The Path of Anger: Book I of The Book And the Sword series (La Voie de la Colere - Le Livre et l'Epee: I), is supposed to happen at the end of this year - start of next year.

I've really enjoyed The Path of Anger -- it had so many twists and turns, and it was fun to identify the bits and pieces that went into his world building, including the Holy Roman Empire and the French Revolution.

The dragons and other sorts of made-up creatures didn't work so well, or at least not so far.

However, at least almost to the end, the first volume is a terrific revenge tale, like those Jacobean blood and thunder plays. This appeals quite a bit to my current slant on political life right now, so there's that.  There are understandable echoes in places of The Count of Monte Cristo too.   

One expects -- hopes? --  the author has learned a great deal about writing in the intervening 5 years that he didn't know when writing his first novel.  Or, maybe, he's just another Patrick Rothfuss?  Great initial success paralyzes, sometimes, it seems.

 

Edited by Zorral

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Black Leopard, Red Wolf (Dark Star Trilogy #1) by Marlon James

US publication date: Feb 05, 2019
UK publication date: Feb 21, 2019

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'Black Leopard, Red Wolf is the kind of novel I never realized I was missing until I read it. A dangerous, hallucinatory, ancient Africa, which becomes a fantasy world as well-realized as anything Tolkien made, with language as powerful as Angela Carter's. I cannot wait for the next installment' - Neil Gaiman, author of American Gods

In this stunning follow-up to his Man Booker-winning A Brief History of Seven Killings, Marlon James draws on myth, fantasy and history to imagine a wholly new world, in which a legendary Tracker is hired to find a missing child...
Tracker is known far and wide for his skills as a hunter: 'He has a nose,' people say - as well as the eye of a wolf. Engaged to find a mysterious boy who has disappeared three years before, Tracker breaks his own rule of always working alone when he finds himself part of a rag-tag group that comes together to search for the boy. Full of striking characters with secrets of their own, including a shape-shifting man-animal known as Leopard, a witch and the giant-sized Ogo, this unlikely band follow the lost boy's scent from one ancient city to another; into dense forests and across deep rivers, set upon by creatures intent on destroying them.

As he struggles to survive, Tracker starts to wonder: Who, really, is this boy? Why has he been missing for so long? Why do so many people want to keep Tracker from finding him? And perhaps the most important questions of all: Who is telling the truth, and who is lying?

Drawing from African history and mythology and his own rich imagination, Marlon James has written a novel unlike anything that's come before it: a saga of breath-taking adventure that's also an ambitious and involving read. Defying categorization and full of unforgettable characters, Black Leopard, Red Wolf is both surprising and profound as it explores the fundamentals of truth, the limits of power, and our need to understand them both.

 

Children of Ruin, the eagerly-anticipated sequel to Adrian Tchaikovsky‘s Children of Time! Due to be published by Orbit in North America (May 2019) and Tor in the UK (May 2019).
 

Quote

 

Long ago, Earth’s terraforming program sent ships out to build new homes for humanity among the stars and made an unexpected discovery: a planet with life. But the scientists were unaware that the alien ecosystem was more developed than the primitive life forms originally discovered.

Now, thousands of years later, the Portiids and their humans have sent an exploration vessel following fragmentary radio signals. They discover a system in crisis, warring factions trying to recover from an apocalyptic catastrophe arising from what the early terraformers awoke all those years before.

 

 

Edited by AncalagonTheBlack

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Pleased to hear James's fantasy novel is finally ready. I'm really curious to see how his style translates to fantasy and hope it doesn't change for the genre. The fact it's a spin on African mythology and history which I know little about should also add to this being something unique.

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8 hours ago, red snow said:

Pleased to hear James's fantasy novel is finally ready. I'm really curious to see how his style translates to fantasy and hope it doesn't change for the genre. The fact it's a spin on African mythology and history which I know little about should also add to this being something unique.

I was just going to post here today that this is one of the fantasy novels of next year that I am really looking forrward to giving a try.

The synopsis is intriguing. Great title as well.

The other big one I'm interested in in February is Raven's Tower by Leckie, mainly because of the acclaim for her SF work.

It's been kept quiet so far what that one will be about.

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10 hours ago, Calibandar said:

I was just going to post here today that this is one of the fantasy novels of next year that I am really looking forrward to giving a try.

The synopsis is intriguing. Great title as well.

The other big one I'm interested in in February is Raven's Tower by Leckie, mainly because of the acclaim for her SF work.

It's been kept quiet so far what that one will be about.

It's definitely the fantasy book of next year I'm most excited about even if some of my regular favourites have stuff coming out I sort of know what to expect.

Thanks for pointing Raven's tower out. I've only read the first of her ancillary books and while it didn't click for me that was more to do with the genre than the writing/ideas. Again, I'm very intrigued at what she might conjure up in a fantasy setting. Basically I think I'm becoming a sucker for authors from other genres tackling fantasy especially when they have already demonstrated their writing talent.

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On 8/24/2018 at 9:40 PM, IlyaP said:

Isn't Neal Stephenson due to publish a new book in 2019, called 'Fall'? It's meant to be a retelling of Milton's Paradise Lost, and was scheduled to be published originally in Q3 of 2017, but was pushed back for reasons unknown. 

(Borough Press is meant to be publishing it, if memory serves.)

 

Can't wait for his Mary Jane take on Eve,  written exactly as if she was a man and with 10k pages of footnotes on the evolutionary development of the apple and snakes.

 

To be fair, I didn't read the book after Readme, because it sounded as terrible as Readme was. Maybe he's pulled out of his encyclopedic tailspin. 

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16 hours ago, Vaughn said:

Can't wait for his Mary Jane take on Eve,  written exactly as if she was a man and with 10k pages of footnotes on the evolutionary development of the apple and snakes.

 

To be fair, I didn't read the book after Readme, because it sounded as terrible as Readme was. Maybe he's pulled out of his encyclopedic tailspin. 

That's quite a funny take on his style. I enjoy his books but there's little escaping that's how he approaches them

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Cage of Souls by the ever prolific Adrian Tchaikovsky, set for an April release date:

 

Quote

The Sun is bloated, diseased, dying perhaps. Beneath its baneful light, Shadrapur, last of all cities, harbours fewer than 100,000 human souls. Built on the ruins of countless civilisations, surviving on the debris of its long-dead progenitors, Shadrapur is a museum, a midden, an asylum, a prison on a world that is ever more alien to humanity.

Bearing witness to the desperate struggle for existence between life old and new, is Stefan Advani, rebel, outlaw, prisoner, survivor. This is his testament, an account of the journey that took him into the blazing desolation of the western deserts; that transported him east down the river and imprisoned him in verdant hell of the jungle's darkest heart; that led him deep into the labyrinths and caverns of the underworld. He will treat with monsters, madman, mutants. The question is, which one of them will inherit this Earth?

 

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On 9/27/2018 at 12:53 PM, Calibandar said:

Cage of Souls by the ever prolific Adrian Tchaikovsky, set for an April release date:

 

 

Sometimes I think this author writes in his sleep or has been stockpiling work from the age of 15. It's almost at the point where he needs to slow down as frankly I'm a bit overwhelmed by the amount of material he has out that I've yet to read. I don't think I've ever complained about an author I like writing too much!

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Yeah his output is insane. Best work by him for me is last year's Dogs of War.

So next year he has this one out, Cage of Souls, listed at 600 pages, plus Children of Ruin, sequel to Children of Time.

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5 hours ago, Calibandar said:

Yeah his output is insane. Best work by him for me is last year's Dogs of War.

So next year he has this one out, Cage of Souls, listed at 600 pages, plus Children of Ruin, sequel to Children of Time.

Is that the mech warrior one? I think I have the ebook for that. It's good the quality does not appear to drop and he seems at home with SF as fantasy although that was clear from his "sea war" book.

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No that one is called Ironclad, it's a short novel, Dogs of War is a full size novel.

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2 hours ago, Calibandar said:

No that one is called Ironclad, it's a short novel, Dogs of War is a full size novel.

This is what happens when he has so many books! :)

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Posted (edited)

Long time no see.  Been a while since I posted, but wanted to share something which I don't think was posted yet.  So, I had recently seen that K.J. Parker's upcoming book had a synopsis posted on Amazon and now that it has a title too, wanted to share:

It's called Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City and is set to release on April 09, 2019

Quote

The powerful new novel from World Fantasy Award-winner K. J. Parker and the start of a sweeping new epic fantasy series.

A siege is approaching, and the City has little time left to prepare. The people have no food and no weapons, and the enemy has sworn to slaughter them all.

Their only chance rests with a colonel of engineers - a despised outsider, a genius, a master of military and political strategy with the wrong color skin. He is the City's only hope.

But nobody, rich or poor, wants to take orders from a jumped-up Milkface. Saving the City from itself might be more difficult than surviving the coming siege.

Link here- https://www.amazon.com/Sixteen-Ways-Defend-Walled-City/dp/0316270792/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1538417663&sr=1-1&keywords=k.j.+parker

 

Sounds interesting and that's a seemingly humorous title even though the premise and Parker's other things dealing with sieges suggests something grim.

Not sure what I think about the reverse racism aspect of the premise.  It's been pretty common in Parker's novels and stories for the aristocratic/Imperial group to have darker skin than outsiders/main characters, but it's always been more of an implicit thing than part of the premise.  So, curious where he's going with this...

Edited by Brother Longfoot

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