Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
RedEyedGhost

October Reading 2018 - The chill in the air, the whisper on the wind.

Recommended Posts

19 minutes ago, Darth Richard II said:

Isn't Blood of Elves book 3?

If by book 3 you mean book 1, then yes, you are correct. 

There were two short story collections published before it, but 

Blood of Elves is the book in the series

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All done with Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. This was every bit as brilliant as I remembered, particularly the 

Spoiler

time-travelling twist at the end of the book.

I also enjoyed the progression to slightly darker themes than the previous instalments.

Now reading Borne by Jeff VanderMeer. So far, so good with this one - the prose is really quite excellent.

Edited by Paxter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last Friday I finished The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party by Michael F. Holt, almost 1300 pages of text and notes about the 20-year lifespan of a political party that was crucial in understanding the antebellum period and the onset of the Civil War.  This was Holt's academic magnum opus and it is extremely detailed not only telling the history of politics on the national level but state, county, and even cities.  Took me over a month to read, but was worth it.

This past weekend I read another children's book just as a breath of fresh air in opposition to the density of Holt.  The Mallards and Their Neighbors by Neil Wayne Northey, a simple nature book for kids original published in the 1930s that you can just enjoy.

Sunday I started The Mediterranean Caper by Clive Cussler, first published Dirk Pitt novel though chronologically the second.  I'll be finishing this book tomorrow, but the 45 year difference between now and then is really showing.  I'm going to rate this lower than Pacific Vortex! for several reasons, but I'm not going to stop reading the series because I knew what I was getting into and frankly I'm more interested in the books in the middle of the series which I had listened to via audiobooks when I was in high school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished Spinning Silver. It wasn't as good as Uprooted for me, and suffered from being a bit overly long, overly stuffed, and overly meandering, but it was still quite enjoyable.

Next up I'll be starting Becky Chambers's Wayfarer series.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finished the Shadow Campaigns series and felt really let down by the events of the 5th book.

Almost from the beginning of the series (mostly because of the foreword) I was expecting Janus to be the final antagonist. You spend most of the series watching Janus outsmart everyone in politics and war and then start to learn that his motivations aren't really to help Vordan, but to pursue some private matter concerning the magic at Elysium. In Guns of Empire I thought Janus was going to go full-Napoleon, declare himself Emperor and shelve Raesinia to achieve his own goals. Now his genius would be working against the protagonists which would be genuinely threatening in a way every other antagonist wasn't. The Beast of Judgement plot wasn't that interesting, and the Beast-Jane personality seemed a bit stupid.

That said, I'm only let down because I loved nearly everything else about the series. Jane was my only other complaint (nearly ruined my interest in Winter). I started reading the Powder Mage books, the Guns of the Dawn and am looking for other musket-era fantasy as I really loved how this time period was used as a setting.

Edited by The Drunkard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, The Drunkard said:

Finished the Shadow Campaigns series and felt really let down by the events of the 5th book.

 

  Hide contents

Almost from the beginning of the series (mostly because of the foreword) I was expecting Janus to be the final antagonist. You spend most of the series watching Janus outsmart everyone in politics and war and then start to learn that his motivations aren't really to help Vordan, but to pursue some private matter concerning the magic at Elysium. In Guns of Empire I thought Janus was going to go full-Napoleon, declare himself Emperor and shelve Raesinia to achieve his own goals. Now his genius would be working against the protagonists which would be genuinely threatening in a way every other antagonist wasn't. The Beast of Judgement plot wasn't that interesting, and the Beast-Jane personality seemed a bit stupid.

 

That said, I'm only let down because I loved nearly everything else about the series. Jane was my only other complaint (nearly ruined my interest in Winter). I started reading the Powder Mage books, the Guns of the Dawn and am looking for other musket-era fantasy as I really loved how this time period was used as a setting.

I feel like there was a musket era fantasy thread at some point but maybe we need a new one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finished off Justine, by the Marquis de Sade.

Well.

300 pages of dull torture porn, interspersed with philosophical rants against God and Law. The ending is a deliberate piss-take of the eighteenth century moral novel, but I am unconvinced by the argument that de Sade was parodying Rousseau's philosophy. That gives him far too much credit. It's really a troll novel, mixed with misotheistic rants, from an author who was clearly getting off at points. I read a translation, but the prose is... unique too. De Sade describes scenes that'd freak out Ramsay Bolton, but does it in a ridiculously round-about way. No naughty language in this torture porn!

I'm pleased I read it though - it's the book that got de Sade locked up by Napolean, and was the most infamous work published in de Sade's own lifetime. The more famous (and unfinished) 120 Days of Sodom was only rediscovered in the early twentieth century.

Edited by The Marquis de Leech

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have read 'Salem's Lot, Nightflyers, and The Haunting of Hill House. All very good, with Hill House being my favourite. Shirley Jackson's writing is perfect.

I am currently reading the first installment of N. K. Jemisin's Broken Earth Trilogy - The Fifth Season. I am enjoying it, despite finding it slightly 'odd'. Anyone else read this? I'm about 150 pages in. 

Next up this month are these: Beloved by Toni Morrison, Tell-tale Heart by Poe, and a few of Stephen Kings shorts in Bazaar, and some of Gaskell's shorts in Tales of Mystery and the Macabre. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, kafkascoat said:

I have read 'Salem's Lot, Nightflyers, and The Haunting of Hill House. All very good, with Hill House being my favourite. Shirley Jackson's writing is perfect.

I am currently reading the first installment of N. K. Jemisin's Broken Earth Trilogy - The Fifth Season. I am enjoying it, despite finding it slightly 'odd'. Anyone else read this? I'm about 150 pages in. 

Next up this month are these: Beloved by Toni Morrison, Tell-tale Heart by Poe, and a few of Stephen Kings shorts in Bazaar, and some of Gaskell's shorts in Tales of Mystery and the Macabre. 

Hehe, uh yes, a few people. :P There's a thread but it is spoiler filled, though I see wert started a new one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished Peter F. Hamilton's Salvation. I thought the plot was interesting and I liked the way it was built up from individual stories that initially seemed unconnected. I liked it, although it's perhaps not Hamilton's best, none of the characters really stands out.

I'm now reading Chris Wooding's The Ember Blade. I really liked Wooding's Tales of the Ketty Jay and The Fade, so far this is entertaining although it feels like the plot hasn't really begun yet.

6 hours ago, kafkascoat said:

I am currently reading the first installment of N. K. Jemisin's Broken Earth Trilogy - The Fifth Season. I am enjoying it, despite finding it slightly 'odd'. Anyone else read this? I'm about 150 pages in.

The decision to write a third of the book in second-person perspective was certainly odd, but I think Jemisin made it work. I thought the whole trilogy was excellent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, williamjm said:

The decision to write a third of the book in second-person perspective was certainly odd, but I think Jemisin made it work. I thought the whole trilogy was excellent.

 

Yep. More I read the more used to it I get. Certainly fresh and exciting to read, though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished The Core by Peter Brett, mainly because I really liked the first one even if the rest of the books haven't been great so I wanted to see how the series finished. Unfortunately it suffers from quite a few of the problems of the other books, mainly a shitload of pretty unnecessary sexual violence, a lot of meandering sidetracks and somewhat overpowered characters.

Next up I think I'll read Record of a Spaceborn Few.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finished First Grave On The Right by Darynda Jones, which is extremely similar to the Stephanie Plum series but in an urban fantasy setting and even more wisecracks in the first-person narration.  I do enjoy humorous writing but the actual plot and characters were poorly designed.  Much suspension of disbelief needed.  And the urban fantasy aspect is jarring in its internal inconsistency.  But if you like the tone, attitude and wisecracks of the Stephanie Plum series, then this is worth a read.

Then finished Flower For Algernon by Daniel Keyes.  I expect this is well enough known to not need a synopsis from me.  It is well written and thought-provoking, but also sophomoric in the points it tries to make.  Similar to Holden Caulfield, it’s probably best read around age 15.

Next up, as I continue to flit from style to style, is a Patrick O’Brian.  This is why I resist reading them all at once — it’s so great to have another available to pick up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, ljkeane said:

I just finished The Core by Peter Brett, mainly because I really liked the first one even if the rest of the books haven't been great so I wanted to see how the series finished. Unfortunately it suffers from quite a few of the problems of the other books, mainly a shitload of pretty unnecessary sexual violence, a lot of meandering sidetracks and somewhat overpowered characters.

Can you refresh my memory on that?  The only one I remember in that book was the rehashing/reminder of what occurred in book one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently finished Foundryside.  I was sorry to see it end.  Clef is my favorite character this year.

I just started Last Dragon Standing, Heartstrikers #5, by Rachel Aaron.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×