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RedEyedGhost

October Reading 2018 - The chill in the air, the whisper on the wind.

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14 hours ago, Iskaral Pust said:

Unfortunately the quality continues to decline.

can't remember which one is no.5 but Wolves of the calla was by far the most disappointing instalment for me by a long shot.

I'm doing a reread of Bakker's warrior prophet in the form of an audiobook. It's definitely a book that can be experienced quite differently when you know what certain characters will do and are capable of and how they were manipulating people much earlier on than I had originally thought

it's also much more apparent now how Kellhus uses people's love of others (usually by stealing that love) as a way of breaking those who resist his will

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On 10/29/2018 at 11:18 PM, unJon said:

I know it didn’t get a ton of love here, but I’m excited that The Monster Baru Cormorant just downloaded to my Kindle. 

What's this board's issue with Traitor?  I haven't read it but it's on my radar.  It seems pretty popular on r/fantasy.

Edited by End of Disc One

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13 minutes ago, red snow said:

can't remember which one is no.5 but Wolves of the calla was by far the most disappointing instalment for me by a long shot.

Yeah, it was wolves of the calla.  I liked it more than Gunslinger, but it wasn't nearly as well done as 2-4.  Reading the series definitely makes me want to read more of his novels, and I feel like it gives a lot of insight about what was happening in Castle Rock.

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A brief look back at my reading from my last post.  I completed Leaves of Grass: First and "Death-Bed" Editions by Walt Whitman, this one took me over a year to read because I'm not good with poetry and I've forsworn them in the future as a result.   I then finished Light Bearers: A History of the Seventh-day Adventist Church by Richard W. Schwarz & Floyd Greenleaf.  And yesterday I finished a re-read the sixth book of the Op-Center series, State of Siege by Jeff Rovin.

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I finished The Library of Mount Char recently which I liked quite a bit and have now moved on to Foundryside by Robert Jackson Bennett. I still need to go back and read City of Miracles but figured I'd take a break from that world since this book sounded intriguing.

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On 10/15/2018 at 9:33 PM, Iskaral Pust said:

I just finished Blood of Elves by Andrzej Sapkowski, #1 of The Witcher series.  I found it kind of dull to be honest.  There's a lot of set-up for an epic scope, but very little happens in the opening volume.  The world-building is generic D&D, but thankfully it does not lean too heavily on D&D character attributes to define the POV roles -- I was very worried when the opening chapter mentioned a gathering of halflings, elves, dwarves, gnomes and men.  But the characterization is pretty sophmoric, e.g. all enchantresses are feisty, independent, beautiful, curvaceous in tight-fitting dresses with low necklines, and have long, beautiful hair that would make Keri Russell envious; and they're all in love with the same Gary Stu hero, and are all jealous of each each other.  It's one of several echoes of WoT.  The plot is based on prophecies, Chosen Ones, lost prince(ss) in waiting, approaching end of times, etc. 

I can see why it was good material for a fantasy video game, but not why the series was so successful.

Late to the party, I see, but as you may learn in the book-spesific thread, you actually need the short stories (or, rather, a couple of the short stories) to make sense of book 1. To my detriment, I hadn't read the Sword of Destiny-collection before Blood of Elves, and I couldn't make real sense of the book. 

Then for some reason, I read Sword of Destiny, and was left wondering why on earth Blood of Elves was sold as book 1.

Note, there is one important short story in The Witcher, and an even more important one in Sword of Destiny.

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On 10/22/2018 at 7:50 PM, Astromech said:

I finished Roger Crowley's excellent narrative history Empires of the Sea: The Siege of Malta, the Battle of Lepanto, and the Contest for the Center of the World. A brief read, but thoroughly engaging narrative of the struggle for control of the Mediterranean between Europe and the Ottoman Empire in the middle of the 16th C. Roger Crowley was never on my radar, but all of his works are now on my TBR list.

Oh that was a great one! I'm not really a big non-fiction reader, but I picked it up on a whim and it was a quick and interesting read.

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