Jump to content
Rhaenys_Targaryen

Small Questions v. 10106

Recommended Posts

good evening all:

i'm looking for the GENIUS that is responsible for "A Timeline of Ice and Fire" ...

anyone know? 
i email the gmail address link on the document every quarter or so; been doing that for a while but i never get an answer!

 

also ...  i've been spending time looking up time-line related things & such
@Rhaenys_Targaryen  
this a off topic little shout out to you R_T:  thanks for all the work of the past :)


 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I have a quick question about the phases of the moon.

So in Cersei III, AFfC 12, we get this;

When Cersei looked up she saw the tower's crenellated battlements gnawing at a hunter's moon.

I looked up "hunter's moon" and found that it's a full moon that follows the Harvest Moon and happens in the month of October. I was wondering if this is something that would apply to Westeros or if it should be disregarded timeline-wise. (I am having a bit of a difficult time believe that 10 months have already passed since Joffrey's death).

Same question with the harvest feast in ACoK. The harvest is supposed to be in the fall (and the harvest is in the fall given the white raven that arrived), but should we look at the fall months for the harvest or completely due to the wonky seasons?

Edited by Alexis-something-Rose

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What happened to the sword that belonged to the Other, the one used to kill Small Paul. 

The weight of him tore the strange pale sword from the Other's grip. (Sam I, ASoS 18)

The Other's armor melted. The Other shrank and puddled, dissolving away. The bones melted too. Grenn goes to Paul to see if he's still alive, but he dies, so he closes his eyes. And we get no mention of the Other's sword. Did it melt too?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Alexis-something-Rose said:

What happened to the sword that belonged to the Other, the one used to kill Small Paul. 

The weight of him tore the strange pale sword from the Other's grip. (Sam I, ASoS 18)

The Other's armor melted. The Other shrank and puddled, dissolving away. The bones melted too. Grenn goes to Paul to see if he's still alive, but he dies, so he closes his eyes. And we get no mention of the Other's sword. Did it melt too?

That’s always been my assumption, but that’s all it is, an assumption. Based on this:

“When he opened his eyes the Other’s armor was running down its legs in rivulets as pale blue blood hissed and steamed around the black dragonglass dagger in its throat. It reached down with two bone-white hands to pull out the knife, but where its fingers touched the obsidian they smoked.
Sam rolled onto his side, eyes wide as the Other shrank and puddled, dissolving away. In twenty heartbeats its flesh was gone, swirling away in a fine white mist. Beneath were bones like milkglass, pale and shiny, and they were melting too. Finally only the dragonglass dagger remained, wreathed in steam as if it were alive and sweating.”

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 6/3/2020 at 10:13 PM, Yaya said:

good evening all:

i'm looking for the GENIUS that is responsible for "A Timeline of Ice and Fire" ...

anyone know? 
i email the gmail address link on the document every quarter or so; been doing that for a while but i never get an answer!

 

also ...  i've been spending time looking up time-line related things & such
@Rhaenys_Targaryen  
this a off topic little shout out to you R_T:  thanks for all the work of the past :)


 

I believe the dude that posted it originally was active on some other forum and only came here occasionally. Like so many of us he's probably gotten bored with waiting. 

Edited by Lost Melnibonean

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/4/2020 at 7:38 AM, Alexis-something-Rose said:

I have a quick question about the phases of the moon.

So in Cersei III, AFfC 12, we get this;

When Cersei looked up she saw the tower's crenellated battlements gnawing at a hunter's moon.

I looked up "hunter's moon" and found that it's a full moon that follows the Harvest Moon and happens in the month of October. I was wondering if this is something that would apply to Westeros or if it should be disregarded timeline-wise. (I am having a bit of a difficult time believe that 10 months have already passed since Joffrey's death).

Same question with the harvest feast in ACoK. The harvest is supposed to be in the fall (and the harvest is in the fall given the white raven that arrived), but should we look at the fall months for the harvest or completely due to the wonky seasons?

As far as celestial sphere is concerned, I think we can assume that it mirrors our own, but with a few differences...

Quote

Ghost was gone when the wildlings led their horses from the cave. Did he understand about Castle Black? Jon took a breath of the crisp morning air and allowed himself to hope. The eastern sky was pink near the horizon and pale grey higher up. The Sword of the Morning still hung in the south, the bright white star in its hilt blazing like a diamond in the dawn, but the blacks and greys of the darkling forest were turning once again to greens and golds, reds and russets. And above the soldier pines and oaks and ash and sentinels stood the Wall, the ice pale and glimmering beneath the dust and dirt that pocked its surface.

Jon IV, Storm 30

The colors are just a description of the sunrise and a reminder that we are in autumn. The more interesting thing here is the Sword of the Morning constellation on the southern horizon, as seen north of the Wall. Forget for the moment that a 700-foot wall of ice should have blotted out the southern horizon from the view of a man (even if he is the special snowflake) standing on the ground just north of the Wall. Rather, concentrate on the shape of the constellation and the bright white star in its hilt blazing like a diamond in the dawn. It should be a cross with a very bright star at one end. Well, that is Crux, also known as the Southern Cross. The Southern Cross, of course, is a small, cross-shaped constellation, with a first-magnitude star (the brightest stars in the night sky), at its bottom end, called Alpha Crucis, also known as Acrux. The analogy is not perfect though. Acrux is at the end that would be the point of the sword, and in any event, it is a blue star. Gamma Crucis, also known as Gacrux is the star that would be the sword’s hilt, and Gacrux is red. The other problem is that the Southern Cross is not observable from north of the 26th parallel (South Florida).

That an ASOIAF constellation resembles one of our own should not be surprising since several celestial bodies described in ASOIAF mirror our own. The George had just given us a little more astronomy in Jon’s preceding chapter in Storm. . .

Quote

So many stars, he thought as he trudged up the slope through pines and firs and ash. Maester Luwin had taught him his stars as a boy in Winterfell; he had learned the names of the twelve houses of heaven and the rulers of each; he could find the seven wanderers sacred to the Faith; he was old friends with the Ice Dragon, the Shadowcat, the Moonmaid, and the Sword of the Morning. All those he shared with Ygritte, but not some of the others. We look up at the same stars, and see such different things. The King's Crown was the Cradle, to hear her tell it; the Stallion was the Horned Lord; the red wanderer that septons preached was sacred to their Smith up here was called the Thief. And when the Thief was in the Moonmaid, that was a propitious time for a man to steal a woman, Ygritte insisted. "Like the night you stole me. The Thief was bright that night."

Jon III, Storm 26

The twelve houses of heaven correspond to the zodiac; the seven wanders correspond to the classical planets of antiquity (i.e., the Sun and Moon and the five planets visible to the naked eye, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn), and the red wanderer corresponds to Mars. The Moonmaid most likely corresponds to Virgo since there is a whole bunch of astrology mumbo jumbo about when Mars is in Virgo.

The first mention of an “ice dragon” follows Bran’s realization that the old powers are real. He then asks Osha how to go north, and what he might find. Osha tells him to look for the Ice Dragon, and to chase the blue star in the rider's eye. (It should be noted that after this mention as the blue star in the rider’s eye, it is afterward referred to as the blue star in the dragon’s eye. Since Jon tells us later that the Wildings’s nomenclature for celestial bodies is slightly different than the nomenclature used south of the Wall, this is not necessarily an inconsistency.)

Thus, we learn that the Ice Dragon is a constellation, and that the blue star in the dragon’s eye is a pole star. Currently (more on that in a moment), the north pole star in our sky is Polaris in the constellation Ursa Minor, also known as the Little Dipper. Thus, it appears that the star in the dragon’s eye that points north corresponds to Polaris. But there are differences here too. Polaris is more white than blue, and Ursa Minor is a little bear, not a dragon. However, Ursa Minor is bordered by Draco, which is a dragon, in the north sky, and one of the stars in Draco is Thuban, which is more blue than white.

Now, here’s where it gets interesting (whether the George intended it or not): The Southern Cross was visible from the British Isles, Canada, Alaska, and Russia 10,000 years ago, and it will be visible from those regions again after another 15,000 years. This is due to the motion of the Earth called axial precession. This is the motion you see in a wobbling top as it starts to slow. The Earth’s axial precession takes about 26,000 years to complete.

Due to this axial precession, the north star 6,000 years ago was Thuban, a blue star in Draco! And while you might not have been able to see Acrux from Scotland 6,000 years ago, you would have been able to see it from England.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/4/2020 at 12:38 PM, Alexis-something-Rose said:

I have a quick question about the phases of the moon.

So in Cersei III, AFfC 12, we get this;

When Cersei looked up she saw the tower's crenellated battlements gnawing at a hunter's moon.

I looked up "hunter's moon" and found that it's a full moon that follows the Harvest Moon and happens in the month of October. I was wondering if this is something that would apply to Westeros or if it should be disregarded timeline-wise. (I am having a bit of a difficult time believe that 10 months have already passed since Joffrey's death).

So a good alternative might be that a hunter's moon is any moon that is very bright, so that night hunting is a possibility. Probably only of interest to poachers though.

On 6/4/2020 at 12:38 PM, Alexis-something-Rose said:

Same question with the harvest feast in ACoK. The harvest is supposed to be in the fall (and the harvest is in the fall given the white raven that arrived), but should we look at the fall months for the harvest or completely due to the wonky seasons?

Maybe it's the last harvest they can be certain of. Once the white ravens announce the end of summer, no-one seems to have any idea how long the 'autumn' will last. I think Pycelle hoped for a long warm autumn with many harvests. Jaime was advising lords in the riverlands to get planting even though the weather was definitely wintery. It seems totally random.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bronze Yohn.

Would you pronounce his name 'Ian' ( or 'Iron' as in Yronwood) or 'Jon' or something else entirely?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Walda said:

Bronze Yohn.

Would you pronounce his name 'Ian' ( or 'Iron' as in Yronwood) or 'Jon' or something else entirely?

 

Sort of like it's written, Yo-nn... That's what my head canon says anyway. :)

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello. It's quite daunting to engage with a forum in which anything I'm likely to have thought while reading the books has been thought about already and discussed and been made the subject of three hour podcasts by people who talk about this forum in the past tense "ah, the westeros.org days...". I guess my initial small questions are:

1. What's up with some threads being into multi-volumes, ie, 'small questions v.10106'? Or am I misreading this?

2. Are there threads here in which the Bloodstone Emperor / Asshai / Great Empire of the Dawn as original dragonlords stuff ala LML are taken as a given, or would I have to qualify all that stuff before embarking on further investigation and discussion of it?

Anyway, hello, basically.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

How can Roose Bolton pass through the Neck and make it back to the North after the Red Wedding? Wouldn't House Reed and the other crannogmen have stopped him or tried to kill him? Or didn't they know about the Red Wedding yet or what?

Edited by Adam Targaryen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My question is about the map of the Wall and Beyond the Wall included in ADWD. Did that map already exist from the beginning - that is, was it made when AGOT was published - or was it only made for ADWD?

Did GRRM have a good ideia of that area and its shape from the beginning? I presume so, since the published maps must be based on maps he made for himself, but also how much input does the illustrator have? Do they create maps based on the authors' but insert their own personal ideias?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/29/2020 at 3:39 PM, Adam Targaryen said:

How can Roose Bolton pass through the Neck and make it back to the North after the Red Wedding? Wouldn't House Reed and the other crannogmen have stopped him or tried to kill him? Or didn't they know about the Red Wedding yet or what?

A few months after the Purple Wedding (AFFC Jaime 2), Roose is still below the Neck and is heading north with all his forces (maybe 1000? who knows), and the two Freys and 2,000 Frey soldiers. That is a large force and Roose would be cautious of crannogmen. In addition, the Ironborn still held Moat Cailin and we know the crannogmen were busy attacking them. Lastly, Ramsay came down from the North with a largish force to take Moat Cailin (not sure on the number), and he was also reasonable cautious of crannogmen. It is just not feasible, from what we know of the tactics of the crannogmen to get to Roose through 3,000 men up to Moat Cailin and even more after it was taken.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got one: why did Visenya assist Maegor in usurping the crown and allow him to kill Aegon? She’s no better than Cersei.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/4/2020 at 2:38 PM, Alexis-something-Rose said:

I have a quick question about the phases of the moon.

So in Cersei III, AFfC 12, we get this;

When Cersei looked up she saw the tower's crenellated battlements gnawing at a hunter's moon.

I looked up "hunter's moon" and found that it's a full moon that follows the Harvest Moon and happens in the month of October. I was wondering if this is something that would apply to Westeros or if it should be disregarded timeline-wise. (I am having a bit of a difficult time believe that 10 months have already passed since Joffrey's death).

Same question with the harvest feast in ACoK. The harvest is supposed to be in the fall (and the harvest is in the fall given the white raven that arrived), but should we look at the fall months for the harvest or completely due to the wonky seasons?

Joffrey died in January, and that scene was happening in March.

Hunter's moon is in October only in Northern Hemisphere, but in March in the Southern.

https://earthsky.org/astronomy-essentials/everything-you-need-to-know-hunters-moon

"What if I’m in the Southern Hemisphere? If you’re in the Southern Hemisphere, your Harvest and Hunter’s moons center on the March equinox, your autumn equinox. Much of what we say in this post – the general information about Harvest and Hunter’s Moons – applies to you, too … next March and April. Right now, your full moon will be doing the opposite of a Hunter’s Moon. That is, for the Southern Hemisphere around the time of the October and November full moons, there’s a longer-than-usual time between moonrises on successive nights."

Seems that Winterfell and King's Landing are in different Hemispheres.

The Harvest Moon can fall any time between September and October. So, if the Harvest Feast in ACOK at Winterfell was held after the Harvest Moon, then it was, probably, in November. Possibly a parallel to Thanksgiving.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...