Jump to content
Seaserpent

The Fisher Queens related to House Fisher of misty Isle?

Recommended Posts

House Fisher is the oldest Dynasty of the Riverlands Kings and had their seat on Misty Isle.  In the world of ice and fire some maesters said that the first men are originated from the grasslands. In the same book its also said that there were the Fisher queens on the grasslands, who were living in the lands around the Silver Sea.  They live in a floating palace like Greywater Watch or riverrun. The last queen gave birth to Huzhor Amai who would be the forefather of the Tall Men. Tall Men are quarrelsome people and so are the riverlanders. Could they be related and what could be the reason of their moving out of essos so many years ago? My guess it must have happened before Huzhor Amai.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is not impossible but exceedingly unlikely, especially since the 'Fisher' in 'Fisher queens' was not necessarily a family or house name, unlike in the case of the Fisher kings of the Riverlands. In case of the queens this may have been a nickname or a reference to their function in the society they lived in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Lord Varys said:

It is not impossible but exceedingly unlikely, especially since the 'Fisher' in 'Fisher queens' was not necessarily a family or house name, unlike in the case of the Fisher kings of the Riverlands. In case of the queens this may have been a nickname or a reference to their function in the society they lived in.

true, but what you say it could have been a nickname maybe and adopted as a house name

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Seaserpent said:

true, but what you say it could have been a nickname maybe and adopted as a house name

Could be. But that's where distance and language differences/barriers should come in. How likely is it that the Fisher queens were First Men and spoke the same language as the First Men in Westeros? How likely is it that such a name were to be accurately translated if the Westerosi Fishers actually borrowed or referenced the Fisher queens in the name they took?

Also, one has to severely ask oneself whether what people later construed to be or interpreted as 'house names' or 'dynasty names' were actually used as such by the contemporaries in the Dawn Age or the Age of Heroes.

The Hightowers would have been 'those from the high tower', the Durrandons obvious 'the sons of Durran' (or various Durrans), the Lannisters the kin/descendants of Lann, the Gardeners the descendants of the Garth the Gardener, etc.

One assumes that the ridiculous obsession Westerosi culture has with family names - which was not the case in the real middle ages (there given names and names of the castles and places people came from or ruled were much more important) - was not exactly something that developed in the earliest days. Especially the simple First Name family names are likely derived from nicknames that stuck with certain individual people and eventually developed into proper family names.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Lord Varys said:

Could be. But that's where distance and language differences/barriers should come in. How likely is it that the Fisher queens were First Men and spoke the same language as the First Men in Westeros? How likely is it that such a name were to be accurately translated if the Westerosi Fishers actually borrowed or referenced the Fisher queens in the name they took?

Also, one has to severely ask oneself whether what people later construed to be or interpreted as 'house names' or 'dynasty names' were actually used as such by the contemporaries in the Dawn Age or the Age of Heroes.

The Hightowers would have been 'those from the high tower', the Durrandons obvious 'the sons of Durran' (or various Durrans), the Lannisters the kin/descendants of Lann, the Gardeners the descendants of the Garth the Gardener, etc.

One assumes that the ridiculous obsession Westerosi culture has with family names - which was not the case in the real middle ages (there given names and names of the castles and places people came from or ruled were much more important) - was not exactly something that developed in the earliest days. Especially the simple First Name family names are likely derived from nicknames that stuck with certain individual people and eventually developed into proper family names.

I am not 100% sure that those heroes are real and those houses made some story up to upgrade their family name. The case of the floating palace, what is some technique that i only see in Westeros with the reeds and Riverrun. I dont't know another civilization that has the same way of living. The riverlanders and the river Queens has the most in common. The maester is talking about that the first men has their roots in the grasslands and we know that the river queens lived exactly the time periode before the first men in Westeros. I dont say its a fact, but their is something there.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There were also the Fishers of Stony Shore who may or may not be extinct. They could have been related to the Misty Isle Fishers, or it could just be a common name.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We can't even be sure that they were the oldest dynasty of River Kings. Considering it seems that they were from an island in the Riverlands, it seems likely that the Fisher name comes from an association with fish, just as many of the older names have relevance to a real world thing that is associated with the house in some way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×