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Teng Ai Hui

The Education Thread

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Posted (edited)

I've always wanted a thread where people could discuss education methods, teaching experiences, learning experiences, etc.  I just never had a reason to start one until now. 

Legislators in North Carolina are discussing changing the grading system from a 10 point scale (A=90-100%, B=80-89%, C=70-79%, D=60-69%, F(or E)=0-59%) to a 15 point scale (A=85-100%, B=70-84%, C=55-69%, D=40-54%, F(or E)=0-39%).  Personally, I just don't see how that improves education.  It won't make students smarter.  It won't help teachers teach better.  The only thing that this accomplishes is that North Carolina, on paper, will be ranked higher in comparison to the other States in USA.  If N.C. legislators wanted to do something real, they should give tax deductions to teachers for the purchase of supplies used in the classroom or improve school lunches or include school facilities when discussing the improvement of infrastructure (not just roads and bridges).

Edited by Teng Ai Hui

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You may have misread the article you linked to. The "grading system" here is not how grades are assigned to students in classrooms. It's about how the state Board of Education evaluates schools.

The relevant paragraph is:

Quote

School’s grades are based on a variety of factors including “growth,” “achievement” and performance,” according to the new proposal. The way individual students are graded will not be impacted by the bill.

As such this has nothing to do with "educational methods", although I would agree that I think it's a bad idea. 

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12 hours ago, Teng Ai Hui said:

I've always wanted a thread where people could discuss education methods, teaching experiences, learning experiences, etc.  I just never had a reason to start one until now. 

Legislators in North Carolina are discussing changing the grading system from a 10 point scale (A=90-100%, B=80-89%, C=70-79%, D=60-69%, F(or E)=0-59%) to a 15 point scale (A=85-100%, B=70-84%, C=55-69%, D=40-54%, F(or E)=0-39%).  Personally, I just don't see how that improves education.  It won't make students smarter.  It won't help teachers teach better.  The only thing that this accomplishes is that North Carolina, on paper, will be ranked higher in comparison to the other States in USA.  If N.C. legislators wanted to do something real, they should give tax deductions to teachers for the purchase of supplies used in the classroom or improve school lunches or include school facilities when discussing the improvement of infrastructure (not just roads and bridges).

My scale back when I was at school was:

0-4.9: fail

5-5.9: pass 

6-6.9: good

7-8.9: notable (B)

9-10: Excellent, (A)

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Posted (edited)

Silly people that had the 10 point scale.

We had this crazy scale.

A 100%-93%

B 92%-85%

C 84%-75%

D 74%-65%

F 64%-0%

 

Edited by A True Kaniggit

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, Teng Ai Hui said:

I've always wanted a thread where people could discuss education methods, teaching experiences, learning experiences, etc.  I just never had a reason to start one until now. 

Legislators in North Carolina are discussing changing the grading system from a 10 point scale (A=90-100%, B=80-89%, C=70-79%, D=60-69%, F(or E)=0-59%) to a 15 point scale (A=85-100%, B=70-84%, C=55-69%, D=40-54%, F(or E)=0-39%).  Personally, I just don't see how that improves education.  It won't make students smarter.  It won't help teachers teach better.  The only thing that this accomplishes is that North Carolina, on paper, will be ranked higher in comparison to the other States in USA.  If N.C. legislators wanted to do something real, they should give tax deductions to teachers for the purchase of supplies used in the classroom or improve school lunches or include school facilities when discussing the improvement of infrastructure (not just roads and bridges).

My guess is that they're looking at two things: 1.) Trying to reduce student motivation from being grade related by lowering the stakes; 2.) Trying to avoid the issue where if they scrap grade system completely, students won't have a GPA for colleges to look at. I don't know enough, but this is my hunch from prior education research.

But I need to read the article. As someone else pointed out, this may not be classroom related.

 

I guess I'll add (just because I'm thinking about grades), that grades are a problem. Universities are struggling with retaining students in the U.S. (retention being students who start at their school, finish there--and within 4 (to 5) years). The biggest predictors of students not staying at school are GPA and SES. This is troubling because this impacts students of color and low-SES the most. As universities try to make themselves more accessible for students who traditionally have been barred, they find they have students who do not have the skills or support they need to make it through.

I'm not certain what the answer is.

Edited by Simon Steele

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I think my marking system for my MA is 50 = pass, 60 = merit and 70 = distinction 

 

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For the last two years in elementary school we had report cards that didn't give letter grades , just something called the SIN system,  you either were Satisfactory, Incomplete, or Nonsatisfactory, so basically just had to pass a threshold to advance based on understanding the topic material in each class  and behavior in class.  

That didn't carry over into Middle School or High School, where they went with standard letter grades.

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I’m going to try this thread again, and this time I won’t write about an internet article that I misread.

My principal is an idiot. He presented a new policy to us teachers during a meeting on Friday. 

Our 12th grade has a high amount of smart students, and they have been working hard to earn high grades. As a result, they have been accepted into universities at a higher than normal rate.

These kids are making our school look good, and the principal wants the school to continue to look good in the future. To make that happen, we teachers are supposed to just give students high scores, regardless of their performance on the assessments.  This is the most counterproductive educational policy that I have ever experience firsthand.

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Our School system used a very basic grading system that was the same from elementary through HS, roughly as follows-

0-59 =  E or Fail

60-69 = D or Poor

70-79 = C or Pass

80-89 = B or Good

90-100 = A or Excellent

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