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Posted (edited)

Do the books or the films mention stars or star patterns known from the real world's night sky? Or is the Game of Thrones's astronomy different?

 

Edited by Anthony Appleyard

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5 hours ago, Anthony Appleyard said:

Do the books or the films mention stars or star patterns known from the real world's night sky? Or is the Game of Thrones's astronomy different?

 

Quote

Stars and Constellations

Myrish eyes mounted on tripods could be used to observe the stars.[24] There are also dedicated observatories, including one kept at Winterfell by Luwin.[25] The maesters of the Citadel compile maps of the starry sky for their research and studies and their knowledge is useful in navigation at the open sea, in particularly the Galley, the Crone's Lamp, and the eye of the Ice Dragon constellations.[5][12]

Constellations are the names given to a group of stars linked close together. Often times, they represent some sort of picture. Their names usually vary between the various peoples.

The Free Folk have many of the same names for constellations as the folk of the Seven Kingdoms do, although there are some differences. The King's Crown is the named the Cradle by them, as the Stallion is named the Horned Lord.[18] The Dothraki for their part believe that the stars are the souls of the deceased, their brightness being a reflection of their exploits during their lives.[26]

Known constellations

From the Wiki

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Posted (edited)

Thanks. Is there available a star-map of these constellations? Does the pattern of the component stars match the stars in the real world's sky?

> Different star patterns.  We do not have the ice dragon in our skies.

Or the Ice Dragon may be the same stars as the real-world constellation called Draco.

It is possible to fit another set of constellations to the real-world night sky (e.g. see the traditional Chinese and Ancient Egyptian astronomies). Or the star pattern may be different.

Of the stars of the night skies of other fictional worlds, those of Tolkien's Middle Earth match the real night sky (e,g, his Menelvagor is our Orion), but C.S.Lewis's Narnia's night sky does not seem to match the real night sky.

 

Edited by Anthony Appleyard

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32 minutes ago, Anthony Appleyard said:

 

Of the stars of the night skies of other fictional worlds, those of Tolkien's Middle Earth match the real night sky (e,g, his Menelvagor is our Orion), but C.S.Lewis's Narnia's night sky does not seem to match the real night sky.

 

Hi @Anthony Appleyard. Welcome to the forum. You've posed some good questions. 

Tolkiens constellations should match ours, as he explicitly says it's our planet, even as far back as his earliest version of The Fall of Gondolin, where he compares the fall of Gondolin to Babylon or Rome.  Also in the preface to LOTR Tolkien makes this clear. 

Narnia is accessible by a wardrobe (!), so is obviously another planet/plane of existence. I don't know if Lewis clarified this. 

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Posted (edited)
48 minutes ago, Ser Uncle P said:

Narnia is accessible by a wardrobe (!), so is obviously another planet/plane of existence. I don't know if Lewis clarified this

 

It is made clear in The Magician's Nephew that Narnia is one of several different dimensions watched over by Aslan.

Robert E. Howard's Hyborian Age (as well as his other tales) is also Earth and shares our stars, as does shadow Earth in the Chronicles of Amber by Roger Zelazny.

Edited by Three-Fingered Pete
errata

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