Jump to content
Which Tyler

UK Politics: Awaiting MV3

Recommended Posts

30 minutes ago, Heartofice said:

These people with their McFlurrys at the ready might want to watch out. You could do jail time.. 

https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/uk-england-london-47691606

 

 

Well yeah, in pretty much all countries doing something like this is a form of assault. Technically in a lot of places if you so much as touch another person without their consent you've done something illegal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, BigFatCoward said:

Not if they come to my station. 

And if they innocent smoothie Anna Soubry?

What if someone chucks one at Chuck Umunna?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Heartofice said:

And if they innocent smoothie Anna Soubry?

What if someone chucks one at Chuck Umunna?

 

Basically if you are a right wing fuck and get a tasty treat thrown at you, fair game. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Police typically have discretion on prosecution for low level offending. Though if the victim formally wants to press charges there's no discretion.

Could egging or milkshaking be argued as a legitimate form of political speech and protest? Provided the only harm is to the person's pride and dry-cleaning bill should there be some leniency when it comes to political interactions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, The Anti-Targ said:

Police typically have discretion on prosecution for low level offending. Though if the victim formally wants to press charges there's no discretion.

 

That's not entirely true, we do have some discretion, though i'd imagine we would absolutely have to prosecute such a high profile attack, no matter how funny.

If you milkshake Farage and are arrested, they will only prosecute if frog face agrees to assist, which will mean going to court and giving evidence (do not admit it in interview).  If everyone milkshakes him then he faces the option of not going to court, or going to multiple courts all around the country (make sure you are not on camera, or witnessed by a police officer when you do it though, otherwise they could get you for a public order offence rather than offences against the person, and that wouldn't require a court attendance necessarily). 

Edited by BigFatCoward

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So we’re all OK with the milkshaking? I’m not gonna lose any sleep over it, it’s kinda funny to see Farage get hit. But really, this isn’t a defendable position ... if Tommy Robinson threw a milkshake at a Muslim, we’d be up in arms. The only difference is we all think Farage and Robinson are pricks. But surely we have to accept anything we’re willing to give, if milkshake throwing is good for us it’s good for everyone? We get a cheap laugh out of it, but we’re not winning any arguments here. I suspect we’re probably damaging our stance if anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, DaveSumm said:

But surely we have to accept anything we’re willing to give, if milkshake throwing is good for us it’s good for everyone?

Surely we can agree with the sentiment that Nigel Farage is a tool that deserves to be pelted with milkshakes (and/or rancid vegetables) while also agreeing that, since we live in a  democracy, people who pelt others with milkshakes (however deserving) should probably face some sort of legal consequences proportionate to the offence if said others decide to press charges (I think a fine and the cost of dry-cleaning his suit sounds perfectly fair, but whatever).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, Mentat said:

Surely we can agree with the sentiment that Nigel Farage is a tool that deserves to be pelted with milkshakes (and/or rancid vegetables) while also agreeing that, since we live in a  democracy, people who pelt others with milkshakes (however deserving) should probably face some sort of legal consequences proportionate to the offence if said others decide to press charges (I think a fine and the cost of dry-cleaning his suit sounds perfectly fair, but whatever).

And on that note

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-tyne-48347994

 

Farage's Milkshake thrower has been charged.

 

I think throwing milkshakes (and similar) at politician should be treated the same way as civil disobedience.  Its a form of protest that can result in prosecution.  If your not prepared to face the legal consequences don't do it.

 

Edited by Pebble

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t really have much of a problem with the milkshakes. There is a bit of history where politicians get egged, sprayed with paint etc, it’s happened to Corbyn it’s happened to Miliband and Prescott. If it happens to Farage and Robinson then it’s kinda funny.

I think we do need to be even handed with these things though, if you are ok with it happening to Farage then you need to be ok with it happening to people you like too.

What is mostly worrying about it however is that we are living at a time where people you don’t like in politics are depicted as the actual devil and emotions run too hot. A milkshake today could be a gun tomorrow if we start to normalise assaulting politicians we don’t like. Nobody wants another Jo Cox situation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, DaveSumm said:

So we’re all OK with the milkshaking? I’m not gonna lose any sleep over it, it’s kinda funny to see Farage get hit. But really, this isn’t a defendable position ... if Tommy Robinson threw a milkshake at a Muslim, we’d be up in arms. The only difference is we all think Farage and Robinson are pricks. But surely we have to accept anything we’re willing to give, if milkshake throwing is good for us it’s good for everyone? We get a cheap laugh out of it, but we’re not winning any arguments here. I suspect we’re probably damaging our stance if anything.

At some random Muslim nobody, sure I'd be up in arms. But at a Muslim community leader saying intolerant things about other religious or ethnic communities, or lifestyles, I'd forgive a bit of a milkshaking. It's not something I would ever personally do nor condone directly, but I won't condemn it as an act of political protest against intolerance and bigotry if that's the worst thing people do. The main problem is it often escalates if milkshake and eggs feels like it's not having the desired effect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, Pebble said:

If your not prepared to face the legal consequences don't do it.

Ditto Yaxley-Lennon's goons turning up on your doorstep in the middle of the night.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's perhaps a little redundant, because I think almost no-one who reads this thread is actually going to vote Brexit Party, and so few of the people who vote for awful parties care if they have awful candidates, but perhaps some of you might have relatives who can be shown this to sway their vote:

https://medium.com/@SJHolloway/this-is-everything-i-discovered-about-all-of-the-brexit-party-mep-candidates-2a59f8f850c5

 

Quote

 

A vast number of Brexit Party candidates work in property, finance, or real estate. Which is fine, only many of them have been spectacularly candid about — and quoted on — their desire to personally profit from and fecklessly exploit the chaos and decline that they openly admit Brexit would cause.

Many candidates manage huge businesses and have been vocal about how fed up they are with annoying things like the EU telling them that their food produce needs to be safe to consume, or that they need to pay their employees sick leave.

 

It goes on. I didn't realise Paul Nuttall, whose coming was foretold, was now a Brexit Party guy but that makes total sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Pebble said:

And on that note

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-tyne-48347994

 

Farage's Milkshake thrower has been charged.

 

I think throwing milkshakes (and similar) at politician should be treated the same way as civil disobedience.  Its a form of protest that can result in prosecution.  If your not prepared to face the legal consequences don't do it.

 

Sure, people should inform themselves enough to know what forms of protest are illegal and be prepared to face the consequences of their actions. If you can't do the time don't do the crime, as they say.

You are a lot more able to mount a successful defense to criminal charges if it's only property you damage rather than people, even if the wound is only pride and cleaning bills. Here, we had a number of people cause substantial damage to a spy communications (US, UK, Canada, NZ, Australia - 5 eyes) installation and they got charged with some kind of property damage crime. The got found not guilty on the grounds that they held an honest belief that the spy communications installation was a danger to New Zealand's public safety and security and they acted to protect the public. So there can be "public good" defences for illegal acts. Not sure about a milkshake at a politician, but I can see the possibility of a public figure that promotes views that are in opposition to the national character and which puts particular segments of the community in danger being milkshaked or egged as being defensible in court as an act of public good in defence of the safety and security of the community, a bit like a citizen's arrest.

 

On Brexit: has May effectively trashed the possibility of a referendum by attaching a referendum proposal to her deal, thus forever putting a stink on the idea of future referendums? Or, by actually formally proposing a referendum for the first time, has she actually started normalising the idea so that a referendum of some sort is now more likely?

Edited by The Anti-Targ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, The Anti-Targ said:

On Brexit: has May effectively trashed the possibility of a referendum by attaching a referendum proposal to her deal, thus forever putting a stink on the idea of future referendums? Or, by actually formally proposing a referendum for the first time, has she actually started normalising the idea so that a referendum of some sort is now more likely?

By this stage I'm not sure anything May does or does not do has any real effect on anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×