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So what happens to Drogon?

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Bran wargs him and he impales himself on a giant spike on top of the Red Keep

Or he just flies away after Dany dies

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1 minute ago, CrypticWeirwood said:

Whatever you want to call it, the Iliad is indisputably a story about war.

Isn't A Song of Ice and Fire also a story about war?

Even if you want to call it an epic it is still a tragedy.

And asoiaf is about much more than war. It has politics, people growing and developing their gifts, magic, prophecies, mistery…

 

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18 minutes ago, CrypticWeirwood said:

I'm pretty sure that if you check out the actual etymology of the word epic in a good dictionary, you'll learn that the word was first created for both the Iliad and the Odyssey, not for just one of them alone.

Origin: A borrowing from Latin. Etymon: Latin epicus.
Etymology: < classical Latin epicus (adjective) relating to the epic genre of poetry (see sense B. 1a), (noun) poet of this genre < Hellenistic Greek ἐπικός relating to the epic genre of poetry < ancient Greek ἔπος word, narrative, song (see epos n.) + -ικός -ic suffix.

A. noun
 
 1a. A poem, typically derived from ancient oral tradition, which celebrates in the form of a continuous narrative the achievements of one or more heroic characters of history or legend.Typical representatives of the genre are the Iliad and Odyssey.

 1b. A book, film, or other creative work resembling or likened to a traditional epic, esp. in portraying heroic deeds and adventures or covering an extended period of time.beast epic, folk epic, national epic, prose epic: see the first element.
....

 4. An event or series of events likened to those in an epic, esp. in being grand in scale or lengthy and arduous.

B. adj.

 1. a. Of or relating to the genre of poetic composition, typically derived from ancient oral tradition, which celebrates in the form of a continuous narrative the achievements of one or more heroic characters of history or legend; designating this genre.Epic cycle: see cycle n.1 6.
 b. Designating a book, film, or other creative work resembling or likened to an epic poem; dealing with heroic exploits and adventures, esp. in a historical context; (more generally) grand in scope or imagination.
2. a. Of a person, event, action, etc.: such as is described in epic poetry; suitable for the subject of an epic poem; characterized by heroic and arduous endeavour; grand in scale or ambition.
 b. colloquial (orig. and chiefly U.S.). Particularly impressive or remarkable; excellent, outstanding.

I'm pretty sure I know what an epic is. Do you? :)

 

Isn’t epic, epos related with heroic deeds and actions? What is the epic part here (heroic)? Where are the characters surpassing themselves? 

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1 minute ago, divica said:

Even if you want to call it an epic it is still a tragedy.

And asoiaf is about much more than war. It has politics, people growing and developing their gifts, magic, prophecies, mistery…

For some characters, yes. Consider Bran for example.

But Dany the Conqueror and her replaying of Aegon the Conqueror's original conquest of the Seven Kingdoms?

That is nothing but war, naked and ugly.

So we shouldn't be surprised that her part at least has an epic ending and feel to it, one in the tradition of the Iliad. So do most characters. 

As for Drogon, if the Bravosi and the Maesters get their way, he’ll be killed before the end. But I'm willing to lay money on that not happening. There have to be dreams.

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, Nightwish said:

Isn’t epic, epos related with heroic deeds and actions? What is the epic part here (heroic)? Where are the characters surpassing themselves? 

Per Wiktionary, an epic is An extended narrative poem in elevated or dignified language, celebrating the feats of a deity or demigod (heroic epic) or other legendary or traditional hero.

Per the OED, English epos < Latin epos, < Greek ἔπος word, song, < ἐπ- stem of είπεῖν to say. In English it means a collective term for early unwritten narrative poems celebrating incidents of heroic tradition; the rudimentary form of epic poetry.

So certainly epics are tales, songs even, about the feats of gods, demigods, and heroes: the stuff of legend.

That doesn't mean they aren't ever tragic heroes whose song they sing.

 

Edited by CrypticWeirwood

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, CrypticWeirwood said:

Per Wiktionary, an epic is An extended narrative poem in elevated or dignified language, celebrating the feats of a deity or demigod (heroic epic) or other legendary or traditional hero.

Per the OED, English epos < Latin epos, < Greek ἔπος word, song, < ἐπ- stem of είπεῖν to say. In English it means a collective term for early unwritten narrative poems celebrating incidents of heroic tradition; the rudimentary form of epic poetry.

So certainly epics are tales, songs even, about about the feats of gods, demigods, and heroes, the stuff of legend.

That doesn't mean they aren't ever tragic heroes whose song they sing.

 

Yes you missed the terms “celebrating”, “heroic”. Yes I don’t see a tragic hero around whose song to sing in order to celebrate his heroic deeds. Not a least in the tv version. This is more of a soap opera...my brother...my sister...my bad mother in law and sister... 

Edited by Nightwish

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8 minutes ago, Nightwish said:

Yes you missed the terms “celebrating”, “heroic”. Yes I don’t see a tragic hero around whose song to sing in order to celebrate his heroic deeds. Not a least in the tv version. This is more of a soap opera...my brother...my sister...my bad mother in law and sister... 

Consider the Silmarillion. Were not Fingolfin and Maedros, Finrod and Hurin, tragic heroes?  

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1 hour ago, Ellimental said:

Except there is no Night King in the books.

It was obvious that there will be a Night King in the books long before we saw him in the show. 

Dismissing a theory about the books because GRRM hasn't whacked you over the head with something yet is really pretty lame. 

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1 minute ago, CrypticWeirwood said:

Consider the Silmarillion. Were not Fingolfin and Maedros, Finrod and Hurin, tragic heroes?  

The Silmarillion is a book that you put on the shelf to impress people. You aren't supposed to actually read it. I found Karl Marx's Grundrisse lighter reading.

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18 minutes ago, CrypticWeirwood said:

Consider the Silmarillion. Were not Fingolfin and Maedros, Finrod and Hurin, tragic heroes?  

Haven’t read it. But it doesn’t matter. A tragic hero is supposed to have a tragic end. Not bittersweet. Too many genres gathering and I don’t see the experiment working. 

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13 hours ago, Kaptajn Congoboy said:

It happened during the Dance of the Dragons (Targaryen Civil War). The faction holding Dragonstone had too few riders and more or less held a dragontamer contest. 

With a high rate of attrition. And mixed final results, but they found riders even for the wild dragons.

Aren't those riders suspected to be dragonseeds?  I know Nettles is a little controversial. 

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5 hours ago, DirewolfDave said:

Drogon will suddenly reveal he's been able to speak all along. Then, in a rousing well articulated speech, will scold Danny for her selfish murderous actions, and point out in no uncertain terms to all the other witnesses what a foolish and narrow minded system a patriarchal monarchy really is, and curse them all for their continued ignorance. He will then fly off into the sunset with his final words: "Peace out, losers!"

Cue scenes of all surviving characters jaws agape in silent shock. Roll credits. 

Only if they get Benedict Cumberbatch to do it. 

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41 minutes ago, hallam said:

It was obvious that there will be a Night King in the books long before we saw him in the show. 

Dismissing a theory about the books because GRRM hasn't whacked you over the head with something yet is really pretty lame. 

 

Being rude to people who disagree with you is also pretty lame. If, and I mean 'if', you're right and the Night King appears, I'll reconsider. For now, I'll keep my money on the Great Other, thanks.

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3 hours ago, Flightless bird said:

If the show was trying to be accurate to the books with the bonding between dragon and rider, Rhaegal would of never have left Winterfell with Danny, he would of stayed with his bonded rider Jon.  

Going by book facts, Drogon would never allow other people riding him either, after the Suicide squad episode when they travelled north of the wall to collect a wight, danny had everyone jump on him during their escape, this wouldn't happen either.

So Anything could happen in this show,  

 

Vhagar let the little Arryn boy ride him.  But I think you're right.  I don't think any dragon would allow themselves to be used as the Westeros magic schoolbus. 

I still don't understand why these three dragons crossed the wall when Silverwing refused. 

I do hope Drogon flies away like Sheepstealer.  If we have a human "dragon" alive, we need a literal dragon alive. 

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42 minutes ago, Ellimental said:

 

Being rude to people who disagree with you is also pretty lame. If, and I mean 'if', you're right and the Night King appears, I'll reconsider. For now, I'll keep my money on the Great Other, thanks.

I thought your original comment pretty rude.

Of course the Night King might have a different name in the books. But it is clear that there will be a leader of the others and that the mythic past discovered by Sam will play some sort of part.

Dissing people for saying Arya is going to be the person who kills the leader because the books might use a different name seems like a distinction without a difference to me.

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3 hours ago, CrypticWeirwood said:

Whatever you want to call it, the Iliad is indisputably a story about war.

Isn't A Song of Ice and Fire also a story about war?

Yes it is .. The Conquest, Robert's Rebellion, The War of Five Kings, The Great War, The Last War ...

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6 hours ago, NicciTarg said:

Aren't those riders suspected to be dragonseeds?  I know Nettles is a little controversial. 

That was the implication, but when random dockside prostitute's daughter or blacksmith's bastard can be a dragonseed, the net seems to be pretty big :)

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I think it would be incredibly unrealistic if drogon dies in the finale, no one has killed dragons convincingly besides the night king or another dragon. 

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But wouldn't it be an amazing spectacle if Jon attacked Drogon in a last heroic fight? And the both vanish together in a cloud of fire and blood, of ice and fire?

Sorry for being sarcastic. But spectacles are all that now remains of a once complex story, and spectacles for spectacles´sake are obviously all that matters for D&D. 

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7 hours ago, WingZero said:

I think it would be incredibly unrealistic if drogon dies in the finale, no one has killed dragons convincingly besides the night king or another dragon. 

Wasn't there mention in the books of one of the Great dragons being killed in the Dragonpits by spearmen? I think it was because it had no escape routes, if I remember correctly.

I'm hoping that Drogon survives, but it would be a lonely existence, so maybe it's best that he doesn't survive the finale. Or maybe he can join Ghost north of the Wall, and they can solve mysteries with Tormund. :D

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