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Bran's role = messing things up for the living

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1 hour ago, HEllohellohello said:

Regarding Night Queen.

That would be absolutely horrible if they did.

And Jon's next task would be to move the Wall from the North to the God's Eye… :uhoh:

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23 minutes ago, Nowy Tends said:

And Jon's next task would be to move the Wall from the North to the God's Eye… :uhoh:

Night Queen Dany: This could have been avoided if you gave me the nephew D!

Jon: I don't want it.

Night Queen Dany: (screams in ice crackles)

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3 hours ago, Sir Hedge of Hog said:

yes I get that and the wheel will be broken, although not as dany intended.

any thoughts why the isle of faces is included in the intro?

I didn't even notice. Thanks! Maybe after all we will have an explanation, even a small one and the leaks are wrong or incomplete. The hope dies last.

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Posted (edited)

The problem with Bran comes in at his inception, I think. His story in the books is both a horror story based upon a misunderstanding (the three-eyed crow, a white crow with red eyes is his brother, not Bloodraven, and this misidentification leads him down a dark and "abominable" path, so I don't see any good coming of it) and a poor juggling act done by D&D [Bran is given Jon Snow's role, renamed three-eyed raven to distinguish their abomination from the original, which means Jon Snow is given Stannis's role in the later seasons and his three ressurrections (stabbed at the Wall, suffocated at Bastardbowl, drowned by wights) become meaningless and anticlimactic and confusingly unimpressive, which means Stannis has to be offed before he reaches the Trident, which means the prophecy of ice and fire needs to be re-written which means the House of the Undying Ones, wherein it is revealed in its entirety, so readers might know what happens before it happens, if they so choose, the rule all good and capable writers must adhere to!, must be redone senselessly and poorly too, etc. ad nauseum]. 

Because Bran's character was an integral character and yet his story a foreshadowing device--and, of course, lest we should forget, because D&D hate the magic and the courtly intrigues and the wit and love the battles and the spectacles and the tits!--it could only be handled on screen by competent writers with a clear and meaningful overarching plan. D&D did not showcase either. They eliminated the Direwolves, for goodness's sake, which was not only an integral element of the overarching plot and the Starks' character development but also the lens by which viewers can understand the dragons they love oh-so-much (although they do little for most of the series and, in the show, don't even properly showcase the skinchange soul-mating bond as well as the Direwolves do in the books; the best they showcased this--foolishly, without making clear to viewers that Dany was speaking of herself as well as her beast!--was when she tried to chain her dragons, grew fearful of her dragons and their song of fire and blood, experimented with "feeding" her dragons her (presumed but actually innocent) enemies so as to indulge herself in that frightful song of fire and blood, and then decided to "break their chains" no matter the cost to any because "a dragon is not a slave" (and are thus more important than slaves) and "do not do well in captivity" (unlike worthless slaves, apparently!) and "grow small" and "unimpressive" when they worry themselves about "what they eat" when they should be eating "whatever they want" (because, ya know, they're only slaves after all!); which is, unfortunately, why so many of Dany's fans feel blindsided by the culmination of her arc in its full irony (because dragons do "plant trees" as the books shall reveal, if ever they get around to it). [As an aside: I do/did believe it to be Dragonstone that Dany burns in the books, so as to "have the greatest funeral pyre of them all" and "become a dragon," Drogon, "the big house with the red door," as prophesied and as showcased to us in the House of the Undying Ones, and in Rhaego's "birth" and Drogo's pyre, etc.. Have I misread, or is this another clumsy shuffle? It was my understanding Cersei and Aegon, the younger and more beautiful king, might destroy King's Landing somehow, or maybe Euron coming after them, following his Oldtown entropic soliloquy.] 

D&D failed to meaningfully plan ahead--as evidenced to the world brilliantly by their genius idea to adapt a series that is only halfway published and only halfway written besides, and with no sign of getting written either!--and it shows again and again. 

Worse, they simplify ideas, concepts, characterization, plot, theme and symbolism to the lowest common denominator so as to elicit the lowest-brow response from the least mature viewers--oh, cool! (themselves, to be clear, lest someone mistake me for thumbing my nose at the audience; unlike D&D, I tend to presume audiences are cleverer than a writer's instinct to give them credit for; but... I happen to be part of those audiences in most part!)--and flout the rest. That's why the heartbroken and vengeful goddess [the moon goddess was initially the earth goddess, party to the dragon with three heads: an earth deity with three heads that "orbit" it sun/moon/moon; as well as the three-eyed crow and the sphinx and the harpy... etc. all the gods are cultural evolutions and re-interpretations of the true one god, Mother Nature, the first god of Eden: Yss Yss/Ygg Ygg (Nyssa Nyssa="good egg"; Valon Qar="bad egg"/"bad hand" who are her "three quarrelsome brothers" in orbit around her, wanting her throne, plotting to usurp her, each in turn)] became for D&D a 70s-style arcade villain "Night King" with no motive and no purpose and no origin story either, at the heart of it, so easily defeated in a single night it's a wonder the Children of the Forest, their creators, who sing the song of earth and stone (the song of ice and fire, what so belongs to the prince that was promised: the dragon with three heads, Yss Yss/Ygg Ygg!) needed mankind to assist in his destruction at all, even genociding themselves into extinction in the process! 

D&D really do think it is acceptable to so reorganize the sense and the musicality out of another man's tale and score. They really do think it is acceptable to stiff their audiences--and even their adoring audiences--whilst laughing themselves to the bank. They really do think it is brilliant that they eliminated the mystery and the fantasy--that non-existent immemorial "old yore" golden age that so fascinates mankind to this day we continue killing for it--and focused upon our unconquerable division and othering instead of our hope for unity and humanity, our death instead of our rebirth... they let their puppet snip his strings (too easily!) and then bizarrely they made him keep on dancing to that same-old tired tune; the title they chose for their epic magnum opus ought to give the audience a clue as to why. They lacked the vision and the clarity--and the skill--to do the tale good service in the first place. Which is unfortunate. Martin isn't the best writer out there and his epic could use some improvements and tidying-up, naturally, but he did pass them some comely fine china from which to sip their rose punch--and surely had a heart attack when they dropped it; another tragedy, I fear, since I do believe Martin agreed to this venture at all in part because he wanted to give his faithful readers some sort of ending and closure to this tale he's so struggling to complete after they followed him in anticipation for two decades, doubting he'd manage to do it himself at all, and did not merely come to the feast for the food and drink (golden platters and golden goblets, y'all!). Pity, he failed to pass that cup to defter hands.  

Edited by TheSeason

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The topic made me laugh so hard!!!!

The despair of not believing how bad the series really are made some people start blaming Bran, the chracter, for the bad writing. Looool.

OP is right. Bran did nothing "good" except for the littlefinger trial.

But i'm pretty sure the showrunners think he is responsible for the fall of the ww.

Give up this theory guys, they have no time to do It. They can't explain why bloodraven was so eager to bring bran north. Why he wanted the ww threat to be over, why would he wanted to be king and people will fins many passages that makes no sense at all.

 

 

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4 hours ago, TheSeason said:

The problem with Bran comes in at his inception, I think. His story in the books is both a horror story based upon a misunderstanding (the three-eyed crow, a white crow with red eyes is his brother, not Bloodraven, and this misidentification leads him down a dark and "abominable" path, so I don't see any good coming of it) and a poor juggling act done by D&D [Bran is given Jon Snow's role, renamed three-eyed raven to distinguish their abomination from the original, which means Jon Snow is given Stannis's role in the later seasons and his three ressurrections (stabbed at the Wall, suffocated at Bastardbowl, drowned by wights) become meaningless and anticlimactic and confusingly unimpressive, which means Stannis has to be offed before he reaches the Trident, which means the prophecy of ice and fire needs to be re-written which means the House of the Undying Ones, wherein it is revealed in its entirety, so readers might know what happens before it happens, if they so choose, the rule all good and capable writers must adhere to!, must be redone senselessly and poorly too, etc. ad nauseum]. 

Because Bran's character was an integral character and yet his story a foreshadowing device--and, of course, lest we should forget, because D&D hate the magic and the courtly intrigues and the wit and love the battles and the spectacles and the tits!--it could only be handled on screen by competent writers with a clear and meaningful overarching plan. D&D did not showcase either. They eliminated the Direwolves, for goodness's sake, which was not only an integral element of the overarching plot and the Starks' character development but also the lens by which viewers can understand the dragons they love oh-so-much (although they do little for most of the series and, in the show, don't even properly showcase the skinchange soul-mating bond as well as the Direwolves do in the books; the best they showcased this--foolishly, without making clear to viewers that Dany was speaking of herself as well as her beast!--was when she tried to chain her dragons, grew fearful of her dragons and their song of fire and blood, experimented with "feeding" her dragons her (presumed but actually innocent) enemies so as to indulge herself in that frightful song of fire and blood, and then decided to "break their chains" no matter the cost to any because "a dragon is not a slave" (and are thus more important than slaves) and "do not do well in captivity" (unlike worthless slaves, apparently!) and "grow small" and "unimpressive" when they worry themselves about "what they eat" when they should be eating "whatever they want" (because, ya know, they're only slaves after all!); which is, unfortunately, why so many of Dany's fans feel blindsided by the culmination of her arc in its full irony (because dragons do "plant trees" as the books shall reveal, if ever they get around to it). [As an aside: I do/did believe it to be Dragonstone that Dany burns in the books, so as to "have the greatest funeral pyre of them all" and "become a dragon," Drogon, "the big house with the red door," as prophesied and as showcased to us in the House of the Undying Ones, and in Rhaego's "birth" and Drogo's pyre, etc.. Have I misread, or is this another clumsy shuffle? It was my understanding Cersei and Aegon, the younger and more beautiful king, might destroy King's Landing somehow, or maybe Euron coming after them, following his Oldtown entropic soliloquy.] 

D&D failed to meaningfully plan ahead--as evidenced to the world brilliantly by their genius idea to adapt a series that is only halfway published and only halfway written besides, and with no sign of getting written either!--and it shows again and again. 

Worse, they simplify ideas, concepts, characterization, plot, theme and symbolism to the lowest common denominator so as to elicit the lowest-brow response from the least mature viewers--oh, cool! (themselves, to be clear, lest someone mistake me for thumbing my nose at the audience; unlike D&D, I tend to presume audiences are cleverer than a writer's instinct to give them credit for; but... I happen to be part of those audiences in most part!)--and flout the rest. That's why the heartbroken and vengeful goddess [the moon goddess was initially the earth goddess, party to the dragon with three heads: an earth deity with three heads that "orbit" it sun/moon/moon; as well as the three-eyed crow and the sphinx and the harpy... etc. all the gods are cultural evolutions and re-interpretations of the true one god, Mother Nature, the first god of Eden: Yss Yss/Ygg Ygg (Nyssa Nyssa="good egg"; Valon Qar="bad egg"/"bad hand" who are her "three quarrelsome brothers" in orbit around her, wanting her throne, plotting to usurp her, each in turn)] became for D&D a 70s-style arcade villain "Night King" with no motive and no purpose and no origin story either, at the heart of it, so easily defeated in a single night it's a wonder the Children of the Forest, their creators, who sing the song of earth and stone (the song of ice and fire, what so belongs to the prince that was promised: the dragon with three heads, Yss Yss/Ygg Ygg!) needed mankind to assist in his destruction at all, even genociding themselves into extinction in the process! 

D&D really do think it is acceptable to so reorganize the sense and the musicality out of another man's tale and score. They really do think it is acceptable to stiff their audiences--and even their adoring audiences--whilst laughing themselves to the bank. They really do think it is brilliant that they eliminated the mystery and the fantasy--that non-existent immemorial "old yore" golden age that so fascinates mankind to this day we continue killing for it--and focused upon our unconquerable division and othering instead of our hope for unity and humanity, our death instead of our rebirth... they let their puppet snip his strings (too easily!) and then bizarrely they made him keep on dancing to that same-old tired tune; the title they chose for their epic magnum opus ought to give the audience a clue as to why. They lacked the vision and the clarity--and the skill--to do the tale good service in the first place. Which is unfortunate. Martin isn't the best writer out there and his epic could use some improvements and tidying-up, naturally, but he did pass them some comely fine china from which to sip their rose punch--and surely had a heart attack when they dropped it; another tragedy, I fear, since I do believe Martin agreed to this venture at all in part because he wanted to give his faithful readers some sort of ending and closure to this tale he's so struggling to complete after they followed him in anticipation for two decades, doubting he'd manage to do it himself at all, and did not merely come to the feast for the food and drink (golden platters and golden goblets, y'all!). Pity, he failed to pass that cup to defter hands.  

Brilliant. 

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14 hours ago, joaozinm said:

The topic made me laugh so hard!!!!

The despair of not believing how bad the series really are made some people start blaming Bran, the chracter, for the bad writing. Looool.

OP is right. Bran did nothing "good" except for the littlefinger trial.

But i'm pretty sure the showrunners think he is responsible for the fall of the ww.

Give up this theory guys, they have no time to do It. They can't explain why bloodraven was so eager to bring bran north. Why he wanted the ww threat to be over, why would he wanted to be king and people will fins many passages that makes no sense at all.

 

 

You are probably right - there is no time BUT I cant think of any other WTF moment...

Dany burning KL ? Nope

Jon killing Dany - we all know this is gonna happen 

3rd WTF?

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On 5/15/2019 at 10:05 AM, Torienne said:

The more I think about it the more convinced I am.

When I compare the lively little boy - even after his fall from the tower - with that non-human monster that did not feel anything anymore - even to someone like Meera who again and again risked her life for him - when I remember his ice-cold reactions meeting his siblings after all those years - when I think that a hint of that former liveliness showed only when he said "We need to tell him" - 

- yes, I really do think that Bran´s intentions are not friendly to mankind.

I think that the 3ER's intentions are friendly to mankind.  But not necessarily friendly to any individual human.

I view him more or less as the Leto II, the God-Emperor of Dune.  He has the 10,000 year perspective on mankind.

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11 hours ago, Tywin Tytosson said:

I think that the 3ER's intentions are friendly to mankind.  But not necessarily friendly to any individual human.

I view him more or less as the Leto II, the God-Emperor of Dune.  He has the 10,000 year perspective on mankind.

I'm loving the Dune references! On another thread Dany was compared to Paul Atreides (future book Dany that is, not so much D&D's creation). What an amazing series Dune was. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Ser Hedge said:

I'm loving the Dune references! On another thread Dany was compared to Paul Atreides (future book Dany that is, not so much D&D's creation). What an amazing series Dune was. 

Yes, it was.  Quite an amazing series.  Particularly when Frank Herbert was writing it.  ;)

Do you have a link to that thread comparing Dany to Paul?

Edited by Tywin Tytosson

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