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The Book of The Kingsguard - Help Me Decide

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I'm not sure how I feel about the scene with Ser Brienne completing Jaime's chapter in the book of the Kingsguard. At first, it was "oh, at least they're giving credence to that." However, in the book canon, that Kingsguard book is central to Jaime's redemption arc. Also, it seems that they're using it t gloss over the catastrophe that was Jaime's show character. To me, this was almost troll-level insulting. Like D&D were going out of their way to drop a final 'screw you' to the book readers. Equal parts touching and insulting to me.

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10 hours ago, #FreeGhost said:

I'm not sure how I feel about the scene with Ser Brienne completing Jaime's chapter in the book of the Kingsguard.

I personally liked the scene. It would have been strange if the ending to Brienne and Jaime’s relationship had been left with her sobbing as he rides off to a certain death... and then nothing else. I expected them to provide some kind of closure for both Brienne and Jaime, and I thought this served nicely. It shows Brienne doing her duty as commander of the kings guard, pays homage to their relationship, and also showcases Jaime’s development into a better man.

10 hours ago, #FreeGhost said:

Also, it seems that they're using it t gloss over the catastrophe that was Jaime's show character.

Do you think his whole character development was a catastrophe, or that Jaime ultimately returning to Cersei ruined his arc?

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10 hours ago, #FreeGhost said:

I'm not sure how I feel about the scene with Ser Brienne completing Jaime's chapter in the book of the Kingsguard. At first, it was "oh, at least they're giving credence to that." However, in the book canon, that Kingsguard book is central to Jaime's redemption arc. Also, it seems that they're using it t gloss over the catastrophe that was Jaime's show character. To me, this was almost troll-level insulting. Like D&D were going out of their way to drop a final 'screw you' to the book readers. Equal parts touching and insulting to me.

I agree. While I liked the scene by itself it's like D&D are trying to brush under the rug the fact that they ruined Jaime. In their defense I don't think they do it on purpose. Not remembering what the characters have said/done one episode to the next is kind of their M.O. 

 

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22 minutes ago, a girl knows nothing said:

It shows Brienne doing her duty as commander of the kings guard, pays homage to their relationship, and also showcases Jaime’s development into a better man.

I think this is the conundrum though isn't it? It does pay homage to their relationship & showcases Jaime's development into a better man - which just accentuates the idea that Jaime sleeping with & then leaving Brienne is absurd. It was a very "season 1 Jaime" thing to do. Season 8 Jaime has grown & matured & changed (most) of his ways. They take all that away from him by having him break Brienne's heart & run back to Cersei. 

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Just now, Lyanna<3Rhaegar said:

I think this is the conundrum though isn't it? It does pay homage to their relationship & showcases Jaime's development into a better man - which just accentuates the idea that Jaime sleeping with & then leaving Brienne is absurd. It was a very "season 1 Jaime" thing to do. Season 8 Jaime has grown & matured & changed (most) of his ways. They take all that away from him by having him break Brienne's heart & run back to Cersei. 

I was also very disappointed in Jaime going back to Cersei (I was so happy when he finally rode away from her last season!), but I don’t think it necessarily ruins his development into a better, more noble, and less selfish man. He was trying to save his sister, despite her being a terrible “hateful” person, because he loves her. He was ultimately willing to die just for the slim chance of saving her. His one overarching flaw was always his love for Cersei, so even though he did become a better person overall, he wasn’t perfect - he still had that flaw. 

I also don’t think Brienne was heartbroken over the fact that Jaime slept with her and then “dumped” her. I think she was upset because she knew he was most likely going to die and she cared about him as a person. I do wish they had never even had them sleep together though - that very brief romantic subplot seemed entirely unnecessary for their relationship in my opinion. 

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6 minutes ago, Lyanna<3Rhaegar said:

I think this is the conundrum though isn't it? It does pay homage to their relationship & showcases Jaime's development into a better man - which just accentuates the idea that Jaime sleeping with & then leaving Brienne is absurd. It was a very "season 1 Jaime" thing to do. Season 8 Jaime has grown & matured & changed (most) of his ways. They take all that away from him by having him break Brienne's heart & run back to Cersei. 

It's amazing how many people misunderstand the final scene with Jaime and Brienne. People praise George RR Martin for having realistic and morally grey characters but scoff at the show whenever it tries to show a character having the same level of humanity. I'm not going to defend a lot of what D&D did this season but it's kind of irritating me how many people are missing the point with Jaime's final arc. He wants to be a good man and fulfil his duties and do what he thinks is best. He fulfilled his duty by defending the North from the White Walkers and now he wants to do what he thinks is best, save the only woman he ever truly loved and his unborn child. As much as people would like to ship Brienne and Jaime together, it would have never worked out. Brienne helped Jaime when he was in a dark place but he never truly loved her, he just greatly admired her. He did however truly love Cersei and despite all the hateful things she had done, he could not bare the idea of her dying with his child.

Should he have gone back to Cersei? Maybe not. Maybe he should have stayed in Winterfell with Brienne, maybe they could have lived a decent life together. However just because he had a redemption arc does not been he was a flawless individual now. Like most humans, he is still a creature of habit, this habit just being his love for Cersei. Now what would have been completely out of character for him would have been if he suddenly decided that he didn't care what happened to Cersei or his unborn child. Jaime and Cersei had an incredibly complicated relationship and it's completely missing the point of their relationship to say that it's backwards character development for Jaime to go back for Cersei. If there was anything they got right in series 8, it was Jaime's end.

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3 minutes ago, a girl knows nothing said:

I was also very disappointed in Jaime going back to Cersei (I was so happy when he finally rode away from her last season!), but I don’t think it necessarily ruins his development into a better, more noble, and less selfish man. He was trying to save his sister, despite her being a terrible “hateful” person, because he loves her. He was ultimately willing to die just for the slim chance of saving her. His one overarching flaw was always his love for Cersei, so even though he did become a better person overall, he wasn’t perfect - he still had that flaw. 

I also don’t think Brienne was heartbroken over the fact that Jaime slept with her and then “dumped” her. I think she was upset because she knew he was most likely going to die and she cared about him as a person. I do wish they had never even had them sleep together though - that very brief romantic subplot seemed entirely unnecessary for their relationship in my opinion. 

To me, part of him becoming a better man was leaving Cersei. It negates it for me to have him run back to her. The Jaime that loved Cersei had never slept with another woman, wouldn't be with anyone but her. I understand what you are saying & truly wish I could feel it that way but I just don't. 

I think we are probably both right about why Brienne is heartbroken. She is worried he is going to die but has also just been used & discarded. Rejected. It has to be a hard pill to swallow. 

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1 minute ago, The Baelish Mockingbird said:

It's amazing how many people misunderstand the final scene with Jaime and Brienne. People praise George RR Martin for having realistic and morally grey characters but scoff at the show whenever it tries to show a character having the same level of humanity. I'm not going to defend a lot of what D&D did this season but it's kind of irritating me how many people are missing the point with Jaime's final arc. He wants to be a good man and fulfil his duties and do what he thinks is best. He fulfilled his duty by defending the North from the White Walkers and now he wants to do what he thinks is best, save the only woman he ever truly loved and his unborn child. As much as people would like to ship Brienne and Jaime together, it would have never worked out. Brienne helped Jaime when he was in a dark place but he never truly loved her, he just greatly admired her. He did however truly love Cersei and despite all the hateful things she had done, he could not bare the idea of her dying with his child.

Should he have gone back to Cersei? Maybe not. Maybe he should have stayed in Winterfell with Brienne, maybe they could have lived a decent life together. However just because he had a redemption arc does not been he was a flawless individual now. Like most humans, he is still a creature of habit, this habit just being his love for Cersei. Now what would have been completely out of character for him would have been if he suddenly decided that he didn't care what happened to Cersei or his unborn child. Jaime and Cersei had an incredibly complicated relationship and it's completely missing the point of their relationship to say that it's backwards character development for Jaime to go back for Cersei. If there was anything they got right in series 8, it was Jaime's end.

I respectfully disagree & it isn't because I am missing the point of his final arc. I would argue there was no point to his final arc. I would be highly surprised if D&D could explain the meaning behind Jaime running back to Cersei near as coherently as you just did.

That being said I understand where you are coming from, it just isn't how I see it. To me, the closing of Jaime's redemption is when he decides NOT to go to Cersei (is that book only?) If so when he decides to leave her. He knows then she is pregnant with his child, that there is a very real threat to her life & the life of their child via the WW & the fire breathing dragons but he leaves anyway. So he had essentially already decided he didn't care about their lives. 

I never shipped Jaime & Brienne & really could have done with out the sex scene or any sexual relationship between them but since it was there: I stated above, the Jaime that loved Cersei had not & would not sleep with another woman. Doing so further sealed the fact that he wasn't that person anymore. 

To be fair I'm not completely against Jaime going back to save her but the way it was presented. For instance it may have been better if Jaime had not slept with Brienne, woke up & for some reason only then remembered his sister is in mortal danger & rushed off to try to save her. But to sleep with Brienne, voice the decision to remain in WF & not join the fight & THEN decide he wants to run to save her falls flat to me. 

Because he is human I think any possible decision he made could be a realistic one given the right circumstances. The circumstances were not right for this decision IMO. 

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Just now, Lyanna<3Rhaegar said:

I respectfully disagree & it isn't because I am missing the point of his final arc. I would argue there was no point to his final arc. I would be highly surprised if D&D could explain the meaning behind Jaime running back to Cersei near as coherently as you just did.

That being said I understand where you are coming from, it just isn't how I see it. To me, the closing of Jaime's redemption is when he decides NOT to go to Cersei (is that book only?) If so when he decides to leave her. He knows then she is pregnant with his child, that there is a very real threat to her life & the life of their child via the WW & the fire breathing dragons but he leaves anyway. So he had essentially already decided he didn't care about their lives. 

I never shipped Jaime & Brienne & really could have done with out the sex scene or any sexual relationship between them but since it was there: I stated above, the Jaime that loved Cersei had not & would not sleep with another woman. Doing so further sealed the fact that he wasn't that person anymore. 

To be fair I'm not completely against Jaime going back to save her but the way it was presented. For instance it may have been better if Jaime had not slept with Brienne, woke up & for some reason only then remembered his sister is in mortal danger & rushed off to try to save her. But to sleep with Brienne, voice the decision to remain in WF & not join the fight & THEN decide he wants to run to save her falls flat to me. 

Because he is human I think any possible decision he made could be a realistic one given the right circumstances. The circumstances were not right for this decision IMO. 

He does know she is pregnant with his child when he goes North to fight against the dead but in doing so he is both honouring his promise as well as helping to protect the future. That is his clear motivation at this point. With inevitable death out of the way, it leaves Jaime time to sit and consider what he wants to do next. You have to remember that when he slept with Brienne, he was incredibly drunk and had just survived against impossible odds. There are many real world examples of people being in somewhat abusive relationships, supposedly moving on just to find themselves yearning for what they once had. He might have slept with Brienne and that might be a conventional story technique to say that Jaime is over Cersei but Game of Thrones isn't about conventional story telling (aside from many elements in series 8, this not being one of them).

He lusted for Brienne because of his admiration of her but he yearned for a life he could never have with the woman he truly loved. Again it's really not as simple as him deciding after this life threatening battle that his next step is to go back and save Cersei. It's far more complicated than that for Jaime. He didn't come to the decision over night like you may have been expected but he took his time and realised he couldn't just sit around and wait for the news to reach him that Cersei and his child were both dead. It's an incredibly human reaction.

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I thought Brienne writing his entry in the book was well done and in truth more touching and meaningful because he had failed. 

Jaime wanted to be remembered as something more than the Kingslayer, he wanted to be someone on par with the heroes like Arthur Dayne and Barristan Selmy.  But ultimately he was too weak to rid himself of Cersei's influence. 

But Brienne had seen the good side of him, she knew that he deserved redemption despite not obtaining it.  And so she redeemed him, just like how he had helped her obtain her goal (though she was definitely worthy of becoming a knight).  It speaks to the love they shared, more so than any roll in the hay ever could.

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I actually liked the scene where Brienne filled in the pages of the book for Jaime. They were both outcasts who developed a deep bond based on mutual admiration and respect. God knows they saved each other multiple times.  And just like Jaime knew that Brienne deserved to be knighted and gain the respect of others, Brienne knew how much those pages in the white book meant to him. Plus, as Lord Commander of the Kingsguard, Brienne would have seen it as her duty to write down his good deeds. 

That said, I'm probably one of the few people who is glad that Jaime slept with Brienne. Some people are calling it a mercy fuck, but I think of it as him giving in to his feelings for her. Jaime had prided himself on being faithful to Cersei, and he had never had sex with anyone else despite many opportunities. Thus, it was a big step for him to make the move on Brienne.

It has been clear for some time that he has had feelings for Brienne that went beyond respect. Go back to the scene where Jaime and Brienne were inside the tent outside Riverrun. Bronn not only talks about the way she looks at Jaime, he tells Pod that he knows Jaime would "fuck her." Why? Because he knows Jaime and senses his feelings for the female warrior. That's also the scene where Brienne tries to give Jaime back the Valerian Steel sword and he refuses it, telling her "it's yours. It will always be yours." The subtext is that a part of his heart will always be with her. 

During a "Knight of the Seven Kingdoms episode," it's clear that Jaime has romantic feelings for Brienne. You can see it when he stares at her on the battlements while she is watching the sword training. Later on, you can see the shot of Tyrion looking up at his brother when he greets Brienne when she comes inside for warmth by the fire. It's obvious to Tyrion that his brother is really taken with this woman. The feelings the two had for one another are shown clearly during the knighting ceremony. 

Is it tragic that Jaime decided to leave Brienne and go back and save Cersei or die with her? Yes. I wish he hadn't made that choice and had stayed with Brienne. In a way, it made no sense after he learned that she had hired Bronn to kill both him and Tyrion. And I think we all wanted him to come to his senses about his sister-lover after seeing so many people sacrifice themselves to fight for the army of the dead. But Jaime put up with her infidelities. He allowed her to ridicule him, reject him for not having a hand and to insist that Tommen had betrayed her when he demanded to know why his youngest son committed suicide. She refused to listen to him when he warned her repeatedly that they couldn't beat the Dothraki or the dragons. It was a toxic relationship through and through, and certainly one-sided on Jaime's part. 

But I don't think that diminishes the fact that he had romantic feelings for Brienne, and allowed himself to express them, albeit temporarily. Cersei being pregnant with his unborn child also compelled him to go back. And I think that was one of the main reasons Jaime fought the army of the dead--he wanted a future for his child, and for Cersei. Sure, he was going to keep his promise to fight for the living.  But he told Cersei correctly that they were dead either way if they betray the North. 

Jaime's story is a tragic one. He was a man who tried to redeem himself in many ways, but ultimately gave in to his darker half. And what makes it all the more tragic is that I believe that Jaime would have stayed with Brienne if she had been the one who was pregnant and Cersei was not. 

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That book in particular is absolutely chaotic... it says "Symon Gaunt" is Arthur Dayne's father, spells "Baratheon" as just "Bara", yet again changed Jaime's age, yet again changed the Dayne sigil, called Arlan of Pennytree "Arthur"...

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15 hours ago, #FreeGhost said:

I'm not sure how I feel about the scene with Ser Brienne completing Jaime's chapter in the book of the Kingsguard. At first, it was "oh, at least they're giving credence to that." However, in the book canon, that Kingsguard book is central to Jaime's redemption arc. Also, it seems that they're using it t gloss over the catastrophe that was Jaime's show character. To me, this was almost troll-level insulting. Like D&D were going out of their way to drop a final 'screw you' to the book readers. Equal parts touching and insulting to me.

You know... I think you've described how I feel about this season. It feels like the show runners have been trolling me with the storytelling. 

But yes, Jamie was definitely a character that didn't make sense in the end. I re-watched the scene where he talks to Brienne about why he killed the mad king. That was some excellent acting and a powerful point of character development. That scene was rendered utterly meaningless.

I think that what Jamie experienced was what several of the other characters have gone through, too: He became a plot device for someone else's arc, in this case Brienne and Cersei. They wanted Brienne to have an unhappy romance, and they wanted Cersei to die with her lover in her arms. 

And since the show runners seem blind with the idea of "shock" and "surprise" as the main, nay only tools for telling a story, they don't need to show any scenes that justify the character's decision. It is supposed to be a surprise after all.
 

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10 hours ago, Lyanna<3Rhaegar said:

He knows then she is pregnant with his child, that there is a very real threat to her life & the life of their child via the WW & the fire breathing dragons but he leaves anyway. So he had essentially already decided he didn't care about their lives. 

You're wrong about this part. At that time Jaime decided to leave KL, and go to Winterfell, because he did cared about what will happen later. Cersei promised to Dany and Jon, that Lannisters will support them in a fight against the Undead Army.

If Northerners lost to the Night's King, then he would have brought his army to King's Landing, and sooner or later, if Jon/Dany/Arya/Bran didn't offed him, he would have killed everyone. Because, even though wights can't swim, it doesn't matter, because White Walkers are an intelligent beings, so they can put wights on ships, and transport them to Essos, Iron Islands, everywhere. Not to mention, that the Night's King had an Undead Dragon, so water wouldn't have stopped him.

And if the United Army would have defeated the Undead Army, then they would have came after Cersei, and she would have been punished for betraying them.

Though Cersei was ignorant of all that. She thought, that if the Night's King will defeat Jon and Dany, then she will use Euron's Iron Fleet to escape to Iron Islands, or to Essos. And in case, if the United Army will defeat the Night's King, and Dany will come to King's Landing with her dragons, then she will be stopped by "scorpions". And if even that won't work, then Cersei was planning to use thousands of innocent people, by making a living shield out of them, and placing it between herself and Dany.

Cersei thought, that she's the smartest cookie in a jar, that she has outwitted everyone (Jon and Dany, by promising to give them support; Tyrion, by making him believe, that she has changed; Euron, by making him think, that the baby is his, etc.). Unlike Cersei, Jaime wasn't delusional. He realised, that sooner or later Cersei will be forced to face repercussions, for what she did. So he went to Winterfell, to at least partially fullfil the promise, given to Jon/Dany by Lannisters. And with this act, at least partially reduce Cersei's upcoming punishment. To have at least a small leverage, that he will be able to use later, to help Cersei, and their baby. Maybe, he was expecting, that Tyrion will help him, that he will persuade Dany to at least spare Cersei's life. But after he found out, that Cersei hired Bronn to kill both of them (Jaime and Tyrion), he realised that, most likely, Tyrion won't help him, at least not with saving Cersei. So he decided to go back to KL, and to try and save Cersei by himself.

So he went to Winterfell, and later returned to King's Landing, because of the same reason - he wanted to save Cersei. And to keep his word, that Lannisters will support the United Army, was just a small part of the reason, why he left KL. Not the main reason. He left KL, because that's how he wanted to save Cersei and the baby, to get some points from Dany and Tyrion, by fighting alongside them at Winterfell. So, you're wrong, about him not caring.

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Posted (edited)

Doesn’t it occur to anyone that Jaime went south to stop Cersei? Just that by the time he got there, there was nothing to stop, just his scared sister with whom he shared an entire life. People are reading way too much into his comment about never caring for the people. Jaime NEVER takes credit for the good/nobble things he’s done. Only one person living knows why he actually killed Aerys, and that’s because he was delirious and probably almost dying of fever. 

If he tells Brienne why he’s going, what will she certainly do? And since he probably assumes he will die in the attempt, he doesn’t want her to do it with him. Think of how often his solution to a horrible problem is to put himself and himself alone in major danger...kill a King, jump in front of a bear, rescue his daughter from Dorne, charge a freaking dragon...that’s Jaime. How many of any of those things do you EVER hear him talk about/take credit for afterwards? But his list of sins comes out quick enough, because they haunt him. He’d shove Bran out of a thousand towers to save his family a thousand times, but he’d hate himself for each one.

And that’s why he tells no one about the Mad King. Because Jaime, in spite of all appearances, is a true romantic. He dreamed about being the great noble knights of history...and then had to stand by and listen while a madman raped his wife and tortured Lords. So even though he knows he had to kill Aerys for ‘the people’, he more than almost anyone else understands that even that fact doesn’t wash away a broken oath. As he says, they ask so many of you...and he’s idealistic about it in spite of his bitter, cynical projection. So even if everyone else forgave his broken oath for saving KL, he never would. So he sits on it, eats the people he saved’s contempt and ridicule because he knows why they are right (and wrong) even if they do not. 

So no of course he won’t say I love the people, or I’m going to try and save KL from Cersei maybe going all Mad King...he never tells anyone. He went North...alone. Knowing who/what he’d face, the hatred and contempt and desire to kill him...and that’s just on the side he’s fighting for. Think about what kind of person does that. So, after that’s done and he’s almost happy he reads about Cersei fighting like mad to keep KL and he knows what that could mean, win or lose. So he again sets out alone to try and save ‘the people’. It’s absolutely consistent...don’t be misled by what he says, this is ASOIAF/GOT, where words are mostly wind. Just think about what he does...the same thing, over and over, put himself in harm’s way to try and save the day. But Cersei isn’t a threat to anyone anymore by the time he gets there, Dany’s burning the city down and so Jaime then instead tries to save the sister he’s spent his entire life loving, and their baby. And when, at the end, the walls are falling him on him, what does he do? Doesn’t flinch once, just holds a crying, frightened Cersei and tells her nothing matters anyways. Jaime to the end. 

Edited by James Arryn

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10 hours ago, Potsk said:

That book in particular is absolutely chaotic... it says "Symon Gaunt" is Arthur Dayne's father, spells "Baratheon" as just "Bara", yet again changed Jaime's age, yet again changed the Dayne sigil, called Arlan of Pennytree "Arthur"...

... and on Jaime's page, spelled BarristAn as BarristOn, and repeated that vile canard about Tyrion murdering Joffrey. :)

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13 hours ago, a girl knows nothing said:

Do you think his whole character development was a catastrophe, or that Jaime ultimately returning to Cersei ruined his arc?

I liked Jaime's character arc in the show. 

"Things we do for love!", nothing changes that. He makes a full circle from Cersei to Cersei, but he has become a better man anyway. 

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Just now, Kajjo said:

I liked Jaime's character arc in the show. 

"Things we do for love!", nothing changes that. He makes a full circle from Cersei to Cersei, but he has become a better man anyway. 

I agree - I believe that his character development was not undermined by his decision to return to Cersei. 

I was curious as to why the OP was referring to Jaime's character as a "catastrophe" - if it was because of him returning to Cersei (which many seem to believe ruined his redemption), or if they were disappointed in his character as a whole as portrayed on the show.

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12 hours ago, The Baelish Mockingbird said:

He does know she is pregnant with his child when he goes North to fight against the dead but in doing so he is both honouring his promise as well as helping to protect the future. That is his clear motivation at this point. With inevitable death out of the way, it leaves Jaime time to sit and consider what he wants to do next. You have to remember that when he slept with Brienne, he was incredibly drunk and had just survived against impossible odds. There are many real world examples of people being in somewhat abusive relationships, supposedly moving on just to find themselves yearning for what they once had. He might have slept with Brienne and that might be a conventional story technique to say that Jaime is over Cersei but Game of Thrones isn't about conventional story telling (aside from many elements in series 8, this not being one of them).

He lusted for Brienne because of his admiration of her but he yearned for a life he could never have with the woman he truly loved. Again it's really not as simple as him deciding after this life threatening battle that his next step is to go back and save Cersei. It's far more complicated than that for Jaime. He didn't come to the decision over night like you may have been expected but he took his time and realised he couldn't just sit around and wait for the news to reach him that Cersei and his child were both dead. It's an incredibly human reaction.

It is not clear that this is his motivation. He does at one point, after repeated prodding from Cersei, say "Listen chic our child won't ever be born if the dead come South" but it clearly isn't his main motivation because what he argues more is that they gave their word to fight. That the battle is the living vs the dead. 

I understand human nature perfectly fine but this was not presented as a drunken one night stand & while the dead being out of the way does give him time to reflect on what to do next - he doesn't do that. There is no clear motivation for his decision to return to Cersei - none shown anyway. You choose to believe there was some thinking & contemplating done that isn't shown, I personally am tired of all the things supposedly done that aren't shown & think that D&D use this as an excuse for their plot holes & lazy writing. 

He did indeed come to the decision over night. That's the issue. The VERY night before he says he is staying in WF. Next morning he isn't. If something happened in between that time to change his decision it should have been told. 

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Jaime to me is Jon if love, and in the case of the mad king protection of an entire city, came before his sense of duty.  

Jaime KNOWs what it is to be a good knight and you get the idea, outside of putting his family first, that he actually tries.  And, raised by Tywin and forever told he is not good enough, he remembers he is not good enough.  Granted he has his own failures to fall back on - his relationship with the kings wife who happens to be his sister, throwing Brann from the window, allowing himself to be goaded into the street fight with Ned, and many other things but in the end Jaime knows what it takes to be a good knight, wants to be, may actually try, and fails.  He fails, and his moniker (which was earned saving Kings Landing) is a constant reminder of it.  Jaime knows who he would like to be but can never be that.  

Brienne knows who Jaime could be if he was not addicted to Cersei.  She understand the destruction of Kings Landing that he prevented once.  She knows the man Jaime could be and writes the final entry accordingly.  

I can't believe no one wonders how that book, kept in the Red Keep, still exists.  

 

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