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What should be done... about climate change

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See this is an example of what I mean when I say population isn't the main problem: https://www.thepacker.com/article/half-fresh-produce-lost-journey-farm-consumer

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the average total loss for all fresh fruit is 58.2% in 2017, combining food loss at both retail and consumer levels. That means more than half of fresh fruit that enters commercial channels is lost to food waste.

The same holds true for fresh vegetables, where the total loss at all levels was calculated at 51.7% for 2017.

>50% of fruit and veg is wasted in the USA. That's crazy, not just the waste of food itself, but the carbon footprint of all that food gone to waste is contributing the climate change with no immediate benefit. The USA won't be alone in this level of food waste.

Important to note, this is food that makes it to the retailer. So it doesn't account for food waste during harvest and pre-retail processing.

Edited by The Anti-Targ

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Food need to be more expensive.. really, most things need to be more expensive.

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14 hours ago, The Anti-Targ said:

See this is an example of what I mean when I say population isn't the main problem: https://www.thepacker.com/article/half-fresh-produce-lost-journey-farm-consumer

>50% of fruit and veg is wasted in the USA. That's crazy, not just the waste of food itself, but the carbon footprint of all that food gone to waste is contributing the climate change with no immediate benefit. The USA won't be alone in this level of food waste.

Important to note, this is food that makes it to the retailer. So it doesn't account for food waste during harvest and pre-retail processing.

And a lot of the waste pre-retail is just stuff that doesn't 'look good'.  

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2 hours ago, larrytheimp said:

And a lot of the waste pre-retail is just stuff that doesn't 'look good'.  

Indeed. I worked at a high end grocery store in HS and college, and it was mind blowing how much fresh produce and stuff from the bakery got tossed. They could have at least donated it to a local food pantry or homeless shelter.  

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Given the most recent hurricane and the visuals of its aftermath, are we just going to have to give up on island life and living in certain coastal areas? It doesn’t seem prudent to live in areas that will constantly need to be rebuilt as storms continue to become more powerful.

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10 hours ago, Mikael said:

Food need to be more expensive.. really, most things need to be more expensive.

Thats just going to punish the least wealthy and not do so much to address the issue. Raising the cost of beef and veggies isnt going to be much of a concern to Alfred in his gas guzzling behemoth, but it might be the difference between a meal or no meal for countless others.

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1 hour ago, HelenaExMachina said:

Thats just going to punish the least wealthy and not do so much to address the issue. Raising the cost of beef and veggies isnt going to be much of a concern to Alfred in his gas guzzling behemoth, but it might be the difference between a meal or no meal for countless others.

I agree with this. I think prices need to be raised, in the form of taxes, on the junk food stuff that's dirt cheap and not good for anyone.

Fresh fruit and veggies, fish, meat, grains need to be kept inexpensive.

 

6 hours ago, Tywin et al. said:

Indeed. I worked at a high end grocery store in HS and college, and it was mind blowing how much fresh produce and stuff from the bakery got tossed. They could have at least donated it to a local food pantry or homeless shelter.  

It's food suppliers and food stores being terrified of lawsuits from selling anything that makes people sick. They don't want to take any chances on people getting sick from food, they'd rather throw it away. We definitely need standards and FDA inspections and requirements, but there needs to be some sort of legal permit for grocery stores and such to be allowed to give away unsold older food. Some sort of permanent red stamp or something that says "this food is no longer to our standards for sale to public, as far as we know this food is safe to consume, but we take no responsibility for any adverse reactions".

But it would be hell trying to work out the legality and such, it's a shame because there is so much perfectly fine food being wasted.

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8 hours ago, larrytheimp said:

And a lot of the waste pre-retail is just stuff that doesn't 'look good'.  

And much of that could go into processed products. No one cares if a carrot looks like a corkscrew once it's been diced. Skanky strawberries can become jam / jelly.

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1 hour ago, drawkcabi said:

It's food suppliers and food stores being terrified of lawsuits from selling anything that makes people sick. They don't want to take any chances on people getting sick from food, they'd rather throw it away. We definitely need standards and FDA inspections and requirements, but there needs to be some sort of legal permit for grocery stores and such to be allowed to give away unsold older food. Some sort of permanent red stamp or something that says "this food is no longer to our standards for sale to public, as far as we know this food is safe to consume, but we take no responsibility for any adverse reactions".

But it would be hell trying to work out the legality and such, it's a shame because there is so much perfectly fine food being wasted.

Oh I know, I was just commenting on the sheer volume of stuff that gets tossed. The bakery would have several garbage bags full of perfectly edible food that they'd have to toss, and the guys in produce sometimes had to throw away entire pallets worth of food because they fell and the fruit got bruised, for example. As to the legality of it all, I really don't think it would be that hard if everyone got on board. Like you said, a simple sticker with a date waving all liability for the store should in theory be enough.

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1 hour ago, The Anti-Targ said:

And much of that could go into processed products. No one cares if a carrot looks like a corkscrew once it's been diced. Skanky strawberries can become jam / jelly.

Lots of UK supermarkets now sell so-called “wonky” fruit and veg

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I wonder if fruit and veg waste has increased since the home economic tradition of making preserves, sauces and jams / jellies has fallen away. My mum used to make a mountain of preserves, and tomato sauce (not ketchup, because hers still had the seeds). None of us kids do. I don't think we had store bought tomato sauce / ketchup for several years. She's continued making preserves from her own home grown fruit and veg, mostly plums, her plum tree is freakishly fecund. Though all that is about to end because she's moving to a retirement community at the end of the year (her choice, to the quite vocal protest of one of my siblings who didn't want to see her current home sold off, but none of us could afford to buy it off her).

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11 hours ago, Tywin et al. said:

Given the most recent hurricane and the visuals of its aftermath, are we just going to have to give up on island life and living in certain coastal areas? It doesn’t seem prudent to live in areas that will constantly need to be rebuilt as storms continue to become more powerful.

It certainly seems like a lot of low ground will get ceded to nature's forces. Also arridness may render areas uninhabitable without enough water resources. People may migrate but it could be a choppy, at times brutal and episodic transition as most natural disasters are.

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Curious. The IPCC has released a simplified version of their latest report ("climate change for dummies") which looks like a good and easy read, but I can't find it in English. Did they really publish the simplified version in French only??

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2. Shop locally.

You've heard it before; you'll hear it again. Shopping locally, when possible, is one of the best ways to support a more transparent and equitable food system around the world. It cuts out supply chains, brings you closer to your food, and provides a lesson in seasonality.

As before, I have a beef with this sort of thing, especially in an article that purports to not be promoting simplistic solutions. Eating local certainly doesn't support the livelihoods of developing country farmers so if you want to support a globally equitable food system then sustainable production from developing countries should be something people look for rather than avoid unless necessary. 2 and 3 should simply be a single item: shop sustainably. Buy goods that have been produced sustainably, including things like fair trade products, regardless of where they have been produced. Just assuming that buying stuff that's been produced locally is more sustainable than products from further afield can be erroneous. Taking account of things like water resources, soil health, and energy use you may find that locally produced stuff is less sustainable. If electricity in your area is currently generated from fossil fuel burning, then local production could have a higher carbon footprint that products made in places where electricity is generated using non-emitting methods, even taking into account transport.

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7 hours ago, The Anti-Targ said:

Just assuming that buying stuff that's been produced locally is more sustainable than products from further afield can be erroneous.

That's going to be exceptional.
And even assuming it happens it's still easy and far better to make local production more sustainable.
It's absolutely not simplistic to advice to shop locally. Even if we're not just thinking in terms of carbon footprint, local production and distribution will obviously always have a lower environmental footprint. In the long-run there's zero reason to buy stuff produced halfway 'round the globe.

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On 9/1/2019 at 7:55 AM, drawkcabi said:

 

Deny. Deny. Deny. Defeated. Avoid responsibility at all costs, and praise yourself for being a practical thinker and not a sheep.

 

 

I was on the bus last month and the driver was playing Rush Limbaugh on his iphone. Rush was going on and on about if climate change is real, how is he as just one man able to change nature? If a tornado comes he gets out of the way, if a blizzard comes he bundles up and stays inside, if a rainstorm comes he uses an umbrella. If the weather gets hot, he turns on the AC, uses a freezer/refrigerator. Humans don't change the climate, they just adapt. So basically he excuses himself and everybody listening because just one person can't do anything about it. "Whew, that's a relief! No need to change my lifestyle, and no guilt!"

Totally neglecting that when humans work together they can do things that affect nature, for good or for bad...big industry, the atom bomb, landing on the moon, A.I., curing diseases, biological warfare, preserving/destroying natural habitats, saving from or causing the extinction of other species, etc.

The whole time the bus driver was nodding along and saying "Yep!" "That's right!" "True!"

I just wanted to bang my head against the window.  

What’s most infuriating here is Limbaugh’s apparent attempt to cast himself as some regular joe. He’s a radio legend with a massive platform that has given him tens of millions of dollars. He could urge his followers to change their ways of living or voting habits to accomplish at least some level of real systemic change. Like, this idea that he’s just “one guy” who can’t cause change is laughable. 

Reminds me of an old Simpson where Homer has one of the best opportunities  to help stop a great evil onto the world yet still acts as if he’s helpless. : 

 

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What "Climate Change" means, as described by someone who grew up in the location that we know as Qatar before it became the richest little ole country in the world, thanks to oil.

https://lithub.com/faster-than-we-thought-what-stories-will-survive-climate-change/

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....The axis along which almost all climate change anxiety orients is, by necessity, pointed toward the future. It is a space that will never arrive, and because of this we are all prone to afford it endless possibility. Never mind that even if we were to impose a total prohibition on fossil fuels tomorrow the atmosphere would continue to warm for another century at least, never mind the glaciers already disappeared, the coral already dead, never mind all the damage we’ve done—the future is and always will be thought salvageable. We have framed climate change as a crisis of the future because its worst ramifications are still to come, and because the future is something we feel we can still control.

But we should also spend more time thinking about how climate change will upend our past....

 

 

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1 hour ago, Zorral said:

What "Climate Change" means, as described by someone who grew up in the location that we know as Qatar before it became the richest little ole country in the world, thanks to oil.

https://lithub.com/faster-than-we-thought-what-stories-will-survive-climate-change/

That bit is common to every article about climate change now, and yet some people still don't believe it:

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It may be the case that we’re past the point of fixing this. Perhaps we might still be able to mitigate the worst effects of climate change, but maintaining our current ease of life into the next century and beyond is optimistic to the point of hallucination. To accept this outcome is difficult, because it entails accepting that the future is no longer a space of infinite possibility—rather a house mortgaged to the hilt, a foreclosure in waiting.

 

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