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Streaming Services (business / market / service, not content-focused)


SpaceChampion
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On 4/23/2022 at 5:29 PM, Deadlines? What Deadlines? said:

Amazon prime supposedly has ads but I've never used it. Apple TV doesn't at the moment. I don't know about Paramount+. ESPN?

I've had Paramount+ for a month (canceling because there's not much to watch). Their ads were just 30 trailers for other Paramount shows/movies (usually Star Trek). They don't run every time. We watched The Stand miniseries over the weekend and only about every third episode had a trailer running between episodes. 

ETA:
Regarding Netflix password sharing: Just in my household alone (2 adults + two teens) we have collectively 10 devices that could access Netflix at some point during a week (Roku sticks, smart tv, PC/laptops, Xbox, tablets, etc).We only pay for two screens at once, so that's our limit. Anyone wanting to watch after that has to use another service (D+, Amazon, or movies we own disc/digital). 

I do hope they don't tie down to IP or location. We've enjoyed being able to take a Roku stick with us when traveling on vacation or work and take our Watch List with us.

Edited by Myrddin
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2 hours ago, Myrddin said:

I do hope they don't tie down to IP or location. We've enjoyed being able to take a Roku stick with us when traveling on vacation or work and take our Watch List with us.

It wouldn't be very hard to tie down to IP location based on time.  So if you log in three states away within an hour, then it would send up a flag.

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Netflix sends a message when one logs in from a new location, also when one logs on with a new or different device -- a message that instructs "ignore" if this indeed was you / authorized-by-you-users of the account.

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I know a number of friends who use their parents Netflix account, even if they are living in different country. Sharing across entire continents sometimes. That would surely be the first thing they would crack down on.

In fact more than a quarter of all subscribers in the UK share passwords.

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2022/apr/26/netflix-uk-subscribers-share-passwords-streaming

What I find interesting however is very few younger people I know own a tv, mostly just watch Netflix on their laptop anyway. If that was the case then it's hard to think it would be too much of a loss if you didn't have Netflix, there are other ways to watch tv shows should you need to , if you have the internet. I have Netflix so I can watch on a tv with my family, and for the convenience.

 
 

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I've gotten about 9 months of apple for free.  6 months from Target and then another 3 months when I got my new work computer.  We started with Ted Lasso, but there's actually quite a bit of good TV on it.  Enough that I don't really have a problem with the $4 a month they are now charging.  We watched Mythic Quest, The Shrink Next Door, Severance, and have just started WeCrashed - all of which have been good to fantastic.  For how cheap it is, it definitely feels worth it since we haven't really been disappointed in anything we've started. 

For All Mankind is probably their best show. I need to get round to Severance.

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The Crown has been going since the start of Netflix, a bit like Better Caul Saul, a legacy of Netflix’s initial direction.

The Crown started in 2016, more than three years after House of Cards and Orange is the New Black kicked off Netflix's originals, not to mention also after Stranger Things started. It's been a Netflix maystay, but it wasn't one of their original shows. Better Call Saul is an AMC show that Netflix reshows internationally.

The Crown and Stranger Things are the main survivors of Netflix's second wave of shows, and with both due to finish soon, I think Netflix are nervous at looking for more shows with long-term potential. The Witcher and Bridgerton can both go on for a lot of seasons (there are eight Witcher novels and nine Bridgerton ones), but I'm not sure what else can (it sounds like the Squid Game creator really wasn't expecting a second season and has had to be pressured into doing one).

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What I find interesting however is very few younger people I know own a tv, mostly just watch Netflix on their laptop anyway.

 

Most young people I know don't have laptops (my teacher colleagues have been moaning increasingly for a few years that youngsters are arriving at school with no keyboard skills at all, which hadn't previously been the case since at least the 1980s). They usually do watch on a TV, but perhaps stream it from an Amazon Fire Stick or a smartphone instead, or via a console.

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6 minutes ago, Werthead said:

Most young people I know don't have laptops (my teacher colleagues have been moaning increasingly for a few years that youngsters are arriving at school with no keyboard skills at all, which hadn't previously been the case since at least the 1980s). They usually do watch on a TV, but perhaps stream it from an Amazon Fire Stick or a smartphone instead, or via a console.

I was referring to people in their 20s-early 30s. Which to me is quite young because I am old. Once you move out from home I don't know many people who can afford to invest in a television AND a tv licence, so most don't bother. This is especially true if you are stuck renting property and cannot afford to buy a home. This is why almost everyone I know in that age bracket watches everything on a laptop.

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I don’t actually own a computer anymore, my iMac gradually got used less and less in favour of the iPad. Just never have any call for it. I watch everything on a TV, YouTube and all streaming. I still find it weird when YouTubers say ‘hit the bell in the corner’ and wonder who the hell’s watching on a computer, and not in full screen. 

I use Prime a lot more recently since I discover they have all of South Park, though weirdly it might be a glitch - it says they only have selected seasons, and the others are purchasable, but then you just go to one that’s free and go down to the episodes and along, it’ll play all of them.

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12 hours ago, Werthead said:

Most young people I know don't have laptops (my teacher colleagues have been moaning increasingly for a few years that youngsters are arriving at school with no keyboard skills at all, which hadn't previously been the case since at least the 1980s). They usually do watch on a TV, but perhaps stream it from an Amazon Fire Stick or a smartphone instead, or via a console.

 

11 hours ago, Heartofice said:

I was referring to people in their 20s-early 30s. Which to me is quite young because I am old. Once you move out from home I don't know many people who can afford to invest in a television AND a tv licence, so most don't bother. This is especially true if you are stuck renting property and cannot afford to buy a home. This is why almost everyone I know in that age bracket watches everything on a laptop.

 

42 minutes ago, DaveSumm said:

I don’t actually own a computer anymore, my iMac gradually got used less and less in favour of the iPad. Just never have any call for it. I watch everything on a TV, YouTube and all streaming. I still find it weird when YouTubers say ‘hit the bell in the corner’ and wonder who the hell’s watching on a computer, and not in full screen. 

I use Prime a lot more recently since I discover they have all of South Park, though weirdly it might be a glitch - it says they only have selected seasons, and the others are purchasable, but then you just go to one that’s free and go down to the episodes and along, it’ll play all of them.

I wonder if its a regional thing?  My daughter is finishing her freshman year of college here in the States.  When her roommate asked if she was bringing a TV, neither of them did, both choosing just to watch on their laptops/tablets.  :dunno:

Anecdotally, she says that she has very few friends in college who watch anything on traditional TVs.

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I don’t see how younger people could afford a tv, or would want to watch anything on it. Television that’s not Netflix or some other streaming service seems like something from a bygone age.

In the UK I always find it bizarre when people talk about shows on BBC or ITV, usually if they do it’s because they are 50+.

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I still remember back in my day.  My dad would say, "I can't hear the ball game."  Then, I would have to get up off the couch, run to the tv, and turn a knob to make it louder.

Also, get off my lawn.:tantrum:

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13 hours ago, Rhom said:

I wonder if its a regional thing?  My daughter is finishing her freshman year of college here in the States.  When her roommate asked if she was bringing a TV, neither of them did, both choosing just to watch on their laptops/tablets.  :dunno:

Anecdotally, she says that she has very few friends in college who watch anything on traditional TVs.

I'm basing on this having just worked in a university and a college back-to-back, and with friends working in secondary schools. A lot of young people have video game consoles, so obviously have TVs (flatscreen HD TVs and increasingly 4K TVs are also dirt cheap these days, you can get a 40" 4K TV for ~£300 these days and a HD one for less than half that), and students showing up to their accommodation with a widescreen TV and a PS4 Pro for their room are quite common. For people in FT education, a lot of them have laptops which they do use for everything, including watching streaming stuff, but that seems to drop off dramatically the younger you get (which makes sense, tablets and smartphones have been around for a decade and are more economical for light web browsing) and the less interested people are in FT education.

Interestingly, the number of people with desktop PCs/gaming PCs seems to have increased quite dramatically from just a few years ago. However, that's from a very low base, so is still not very common.

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Some people might own cheap tv's or monitors to play playstation or consoles on, but viewing figures generally show a trend of younger people avoiding watching broadcast tv, and that number going down every year (as it does for most age groups, but is especially pronounced in younger ones). Point being that there is a general trend to just streaming content from the web, and you don't need a tv to do that, and you don't really need to subscribe to a service to do that either.

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I've never owned a television.  I didn't watch television at all after leaving home -- and watched little then due to there not being much tv in this out-of-the-way place, for one thing, unlike, say, in NYC.  I didn't watch tv until the days of dvd and streaming via computer, which coincided with peak tv and with going to the movies becoming an extremely miserable experience, part of which was there were fewer and fewer movies I could stand to watch.  So I watch now on both desktop and laptops, and I do have a tablet, but use that only when traveling, and traveling has been circumscribed to say the least since I got it a year into the pandemic.

My desktop screens by the way are as large as a lot of flatscreen tvs.

Edited by Zorral
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Do you guys think multiple streaming services will be a thing in the future?

I mean, the great thing about the model is that they are a continuous digital video store. And one that even helps you to find things that might interest you better than the old version.

Content is also not going away like it did in the old television days. You can, theoretically, watch Stranger Things now and/or in a decade (assuming Netflix survives). So there is no small chance that various audience groups just discover or rediscover an older show or movie and turn it into a hit.

I mean, once you actually have subscribed to a streaming service you likely do not bother with promo material you have to read or consume somewhere else to inform you what your service plans to do in the near future - you just watch the stuff you are offered ... or not.

Like with social media platforms, streaming has to become a monopoly or at least an oligopoly with very few 'competing' services, or else it is not going to work.

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5 minutes ago, Lord Varys said:

Do you guys think multiple streaming services will be a thing in the future?

I mean, the great thing about the model is that they are a continuous digital video store. And one that even helps you to find things that might interest you better than the old version.

Content is also not going away like it did in the old television days. You can, theoretically, watch Stranger Things now and/or in a decade (assuming Netflix survives). So there is no small chance that various audience groups just discover or rediscover an older show or movie and turn it into a hit.

I mean, once you actually have subscribed to a streaming service you likely do not bother with promo material you have to read or consume somewhere else to inform you what your service plans to do in the near future - you just watch the stuff you are offered ... or not.

Like with social media platforms, streaming has to become a monopoly or at least an oligopoly with very few 'competing' services, or else it is not going to work.

I'm pretty sure a number of services will fail and have to close down and then push content to the 3-4 big providers who will partner up and deliver the majority of streaming output. It's going to be interesting to look at that landscape and see what it looks like.

I wonder if there will be a lot more cross platform mixing, a bit like how Apple or Amazon has Starzplay or something, so they give you access to smaller more niche content for a small fee. Or will there be a service that just allows for one payment but enrols you to different providers.

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6 hours ago, Heartofice said:

I'm pretty sure a number of services will fail and have to close down and then push content to the 3-4 big providers who will partner up and deliver the majority of streaming output. It's going to be interesting to look at that landscape and see what it looks like.

Yeah, this. It's actually a pretty common pattern. A new market is created; the number of providers explodes, then contracts.  Look at the number of American automakers there were up to the 1950's. Eventually they all consolidated under common corporate umbrellas or they went under. Eventually you got the big 3. Same for video game consoles, personal computers, etc. 

The thing that's surprising to me is that Netflix essentially had the market to itself for so long. 

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9 hours ago, Deadlines? What Deadlines? said:

The thing that's surprising to me is that Netflix essentially had the market to itself for so long. 

I think the main reason for that was that it took the major content creators a minute to realise that, unlike cinema and traditional broadcast TV, the advantages of vertical integration in streaming made it worthwhile.

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