Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Anthony Appleyard

Cyvasse

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

I am sorry if I am too far from topic, but would it be useful to start a discussion about the chess-like board game called cyvasse which is mentioned in A Dance with Dragons?

https://awoiaf.westeros.org/index.php/Cyvasse

https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&q=cyvasse

In particular, to discuss and clear up the many differences between the various attempts to write a complete set of rules.

One query is: does cyvasse have catapults and also trebuchets as two sorts of pieces? This seems to depend on one piece of book text about cyvasse that mentions catapults and also trebuchets. To me, that may mean one of:

(1) Catapults and also trebuchets are two sorts of piece.

(2) Catapults are trebuchets, one sort of piece, and the evidence has been damaged by that literary nuisance called "elegant variation" which encourages writers to use two or more words for the same thing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elegant_variation

 

Edited by Anthony Appleyard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Anthony Appleyard said:

I am sorry if I am too far from topic, but would it be useful to start a discussion about the chess-like board game called cyvasse which is mentioned in A Dance with Dragons?

https://awoiaf.westeros.org/index.php/Cyvasse

https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&q=cyvasse

In particular, to discuss and clear up the many differences between the various attempts to write a complete set of rules.

One query is: does cyvasse have catapults and also trebuchets as two sorts of pieces? This seems to depend on one piece of book text about cyvasse that mentions catapults and also trebuchets. To me, that may mean one of:

(1) Catapults and also trebuchets are two sorts of piece.

(2) Catapults are trebuchets, one sort of piece, and the evidence has been damaged by that literary nuisance called "elegant variation" which encourages writers to use two or more words for the same thing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elegant_variation

 

Damn those synonyms! Homonyms too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You only get trebuchets when you capture a French engineer and let them rename your siege weapons.  Sometimes they get sentimental though and rename them "Bertha" and your opponents laugh at you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

That older thread's last message was in September 2014. That thread has been archived and closed. It ran to 17 pages.

I saw a set of rules where the pieces have ranks 1 2 3 4 etc, and if a piece's rank is x, then it can capture any enemy piece whose rank is (x+1) or less.

I am tempted to offer a rule that the dragon can fly over the heads of pieces between, but as it descends and lands it is vulnerable to attack by pieces near where it lands.

Are there any takers for an idea that a dragon flying could pick up and carry (on its back sitting behind its pilot), one man of the sort who can walk on foot carrying all his kit (king, rabble, archer/crossbowman, spearman)? The man carried would have to move to an adjacent square when the dragon has moved and landed.

Some sets of rules seem to have a rule that a catapult can kill a piece without moving to where that piece was.

Is there a piece representing a man who is expert with a sword but is not on a horse/etc? The term "Rabble" to me suggests a poorly-trained new recruit.

 

 

Edited by Anthony Appleyard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×