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US Politics: A Mickey Mouse Operation

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12 minutes ago, Tywin et al. said:

That was kind of my point. Stick to vague slogans rather than getting tied up defending specific plans.  Once in office you can float more specific ideas because you'll have time for people to forget about them if they go nowhere. 

Yes, that's politics 101 - exploit what's popular while campaigning and persuade what's unpopular while governing.  But that's the problem - Sanders and now Warren are doing it ass-backwards.  Warren is now explicitly - and specifically - running on abolishing private insurance:

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Option 1: Maintain our current system, which will cost the country $52 trillion over ten years. [...]

Option 2: Switch to my approach to Medicare for All, which would cost the country just under $52 trillion over ten years. [...]

That’s it. That’s the choice. A broken system that leaves millions behind while costs keep going up and insurance companies keep sucking billions of dollars in profits out of the system — or, for about the same amount of money, a new system that drives down overall health costs and, on average, relieves the typical middle class family of $12,400 in insurance premiums and other related health care costs.

You expect this from Sanders.  But Warren now has Spiderman-levels of responsibility as the co-front runner (and almost consensus likely nominee among the Washington/media elite).  Strategically, this is like sitting down in a room and trying to come up with the best ways to squander your best advantage.

9 minutes ago, Raja said:

I don't think you survive the democratic primary without being specific about your plans, especially when it comes to healthcare. There's a KFF poll that explicitly shows that democratic voters *want* their candidates to get specific about their healthcare plans.

A good candidate can still hedge - emphasize that true M4A is the ultimate goal but right now we need to focus on affordability and accessibility.  That's what politics is all about.

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22 minutes ago, Raja said:

I don't think you survive the democratic primary without being specific about your plans, especially when it comes to healthcare. There's a KFF poll that explicitly shows that democratic voters *want* their candidates to get specific about their healthcare plans.

Edit: I feel like the democratic debates have shown that you're going to get called out about your plans if you're sticking to vague slogans.

You have to pick and choose your spots, and it's okay to say that you're open to a few different ideas rather than wedding yourself to a risky proposal. 

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Running on vague slogans and only what is perceived as popular (with the rightnutz) and soundbites is how we're where we are now.  Just sayin'.

So far Warren feels smarter than most of us here, including me, and with far more conviction and energy, so you know, we all might could be surprised to learn she is right and we are wrong.  Everything is very very very very out of control crazy these days . . . .

 

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The reason we are where we are now is because the GOP generally owns the Dems when it comes to the "campaign in poetry, govern in prose" adage.  Grabbing a hold of a consistently unpopular position in the belief you can change voters' minds - on a very salient and entrenched issue to boot - within 12 months is simply naive.

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She has all but secured the trans vote.   Now with this plan she's making a play for the mathless community who have no concept of numbers such as trillions.   Will this add votes?    The one group will be confused and may stay away from the polling place due to bad associations with the word pole, and the other group won't have any way of remembering which day is election day as the calendar has no meaning to them with its numbered squares.   Ask the party if they think she can win.  They're not so sure on account of how their answer is, inwardly, No.  And the big money dem donors are all lining up to say they won't done, on account of how she's come out as the enemy of everyone with money enough to donate.  They're saying about a Warren presidency, "Not in my America."

And the big news of the day is that one of the people who'll be going to jail for the last few years' worth of fabrications and leaks and claims of evidence that never materializes is named....... Chalupa!?!?    

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Let’s focus on the two norms you say are most essential to democratic stability — mutual toleration and forbearance. What are these and what role do they play in a functioning democracy?

Daniel Ziblatt
We tend to think that the written rules matter a lot, and they do. The written constitution, the written law — these are important.

But our point in How Democracies Die is that unwritten rules matter, too.

Mutual toleration, for example, is a precondition for viable competition because if you don’t accept rivals as legitimate, then you will go to any length possible to prevent them from getting into power or ejecting them from power. And so, in a sense, even treating your rivals as rivals and not enemies is necessary in order for there to be disagreement and for the political game to continue.

Forbearance is about self-restraint and really has its origins in a pre-democratic world. Absolute kings needed to show forbearance and not kill everyone in order to keep their systems stable. So forbearance is a norm about stability. In a democracy, people with power also have to act with forbearance and self-restraint.

Again, this rule isn’t written in the Constitution, but it’s a norm, an unwritten rule. If it’s violated by one side, you get this tendency towards monopoly. If it’s violated on both sides, you get institutional warfare and escalation.



The rot at the heart of American democracy
A political scientist explains the biggest threats to America’s political stability.

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/11/4/20898605/america-democracy-populism-republicans-daniel-ziblatt

 

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