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AncalagonTheBlack

The books coming out in 2020

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2 hours ago, Maia said:

@AncalagonTheBlack : would you recommend John Gwynne's "Of Blood and Bone" books? The first 2 have arrived in my library, but I didn't know whether to try them or not.

Sorry, i have not read this new series , though i've read the first 3 books of his previous series.They're pretty much in the traditional fantasy mold, very much reminding me of the Heroic Fantasy books of David Gemmell, heroic and brave and very likable characters against Moustache Twirling evil villians.I did not continue past those three books.I also remember that they were not Grimdark, like the current trend in fantasy.

But he does have quite a high rating on Goodreads and Amazon,so obviously he's got plenty of people who like his stuff.I think there are a few boarders here who have read more of his books than i have, so maybe they could chime in with their thoughts. :)

Edited by AncalagonTheBlack

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The Last Smile in Sunder City by Luke Arnold (Orbit)

Due to be published by Orbit February 25, 2020

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A former soldier turned PI tries to help the fantasy creatures whose lives he ruined in a world that’s lost its magic in a compelling debut fantasy by 'Black Sails' actor Luke Arnold.

Welcome to Sunder City. The magic is gone but the monsters remain.

I’m Fetch Phillips, just like it says on the window. There are a few things you should know before you hire me:

1. Sobriety costs extra.
2. My services are confidential.
3. I don’t work for humans.

It’s nothing personal–I’m human myself. But after what happened, to the magic, it’s not the humans who need my help.

Walk the streets of Sunder City and meet Fetch, his magical clients, and a darkly imagined world perfect for readers of Ben Aaronovitch and Jim Butcher.

 

 

AXIOM’S END by Lindsay Ellis (St. Martin’s Press)

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Pitched as “Stranger Things meets Arrival“

Here’s the synopsis:

An alternate history first contact adventure set in the early 2000’s…

By the fall of 2007, one well-timed leak revealing that the U.S. government might have engaged in first contact has sent the country into turmoil, and it is all Cora Sabino can do to avoid the whole mess. The force driving this controversy is Cora’s whistleblower father, and even though she hasn’t spoken to him in years, his celebrity has caught the attention of the press, the Internet, the paparazzi, and the government — and redirected it to her. She neither knows nor cares whether her father’s leaks are a hoax, and wants nothing to do with him — until she learns just how deeply entrenched her family is in the cover-up, and that an extraterrestrial presence has been on Earth for decades.

To save her own life, she offers her services as an interpreter to a monster, and the monster accepts.

Learning the extent to which both she and the public have been lied to, she sets out to gather as much information as she can, and finds that the best way for her to find the truth is not as a whistleblower, but as an intermediary. The alien presence has been completely uncommunicative until she convinces one of them that she can act as their interpreter, becoming the first and only human vessel of communication. But in becoming an interpreter, she begins to realize that she has become the voice for a being she cannot ever truly know or understand, and starts to question who she’s speaking for — and what future she’s setting up for all of humanity.

Axiom’s End is due to be published by St. Martin’s Press in July 2020, in North America and in the UK.

 

 

THE KINGDOM OF LIARS by Nick Martell (Gollancz/Saga Press)

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The Kingdom of Liars is the first novel in Nick Martell‘s new fantasy series, the Legacy of the Mercenary Kings. The Kingdom of Liars is due to be published in May 2020, by Gollancz in the UK and Saga Press in North America.

synopsis:

Michael Kingman has been an outsider for as long as he remembers. The court which executed his father also exiled him and his family. They branded him a traitor, and the nobles who had been his friends turned their backs, prepared to let the legendary Kingman family die on Hollow’s city streets.

Only they survived.

And it should come as no surprise to Hollow Court, or the King, that they’ve been searching for the truth ever since.

History is written by the winners, truth buried beneath lies until it’s Forgotten. Justice seems impossible in a city where the price of magic is a memory. But Michael Kingman is determined to make everyone remember…

In this brilliant debut fantasy, a story of secrets, rebellion, and murder are shattering the Hollows, where magic costs memory to use, and only the son of the kingdom’s despised traitor holds the truth.

Michael is branded a traitor as a child because of the murder of the king’s nine-year-old son, by his father David Kingman. Ten years later on Michael lives a hardscrabble life, with his sister Gwen, performing crimes with his friends against minor royals in a weak attempt at striking back at the world that rejects him and his family.

In a world where memory is the coin that pays for magic, Michael knows something is there in the hot white emptiness of his mind. So when the opportunity arrives to get folded back into court, via the most politically dangerous member of the kingdom’s royal council, Michael takes it, desperate to find a way back to his past. He discovers a royal family that is spiraling into a self-serving dictatorship as gun-wielding rebels clash against magically trained militia.

What the truth holds is a set of shocking revelations that will completely change the Hollows, if Michael and his friends and family can survive long enough to see it.

 

 

AGENCY by William Gibson (Berkley/Viking)

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Agency is due to be published in January 2020 by Berkley (North America) and Viking (UK).

Here’s the synopsis:

A science fiction thriller heavily influenced by our most current events.

Verity Jane, gifted app whisperer, takes a job as the beta tester for a new product: a digital assistant, accessed through a pair of ordinary-looking glasses. “Eunice,” the disarmingly human AI in the glasses, manifests a face, a fragmentary past, and a canny grasp of combat strategy. Realizing that her cryptic new employers don’t yet know how powerful and valuable Eunice is, Verity instinctively decides that it’s best they don’t.

Meanwhile, a century ahead in London, in a different time line entirely, Wilf Netherton works amid plutocrats and plunderers, survivors of the slow and steady apocalypse known as the jackpot. His boss, the enigmatic Ainsley Lowbeer, can look into alternate pasts and nudge their ultimate directions. Verity and Eunice are her current project. Wilf can see what Verity and Eunice can’t: their own version of the jackpot, just around the corner, and the roles they both may play in it.

 

 

THE GLASS HOTEL by Emily St. John Mandel (Knopf)

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The Glass Hotel is due to be published by Knopf in North America (March 24th, 2020) and Picador in the UK (April 30th, 2020).

 synopsis:

From the award-winning author of Station Eleven, a captivating novel of money, beauty, white-collar crime, ghosts, and moral compromise in which a woman disappears from a container ship off the coast of Mauritania and a massive Ponzi scheme implodes in New York, dragging countless fortunes with it.

Vincent is a bartender at the Hotel Caiette, a five-star glass-and-cedar palace on an island in British Columbia. Jonathan Alkaitis works in finance and owns the hotel. When he passes Vincent his card with a tip, it’s the beginning of their life together. That same day, Vincent’s half brother, Paul, scrawls a note on a windowed wall of the hotel: “Why don’t you swallow broken glass.” Leon Prevant, a shipping executive for a company named Neptune-Avramidis, sees the note from the hotel bar and is shaken to his core. Thirteen years later Vincent mysteriously disappears from the deck of a Neptune-Avramidis ship.

Weaving together the lives of these characters, The Glass Hotel moves between the ship, the skyscrapers of Manhattan, and the wilderness of northern Vancouver Island, painting a breathtaking picture of greed and guilt, fantasy and delusion, art and the ghosts of our pasts.

 

 

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williamjm: It is the first book in a new prequel trilogy:

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Esslemont takes readers deeper into the politics and intrigue of the NYT bestselling Malazan Empire in an all-new prequel trilogy

 

Tor fall 2020 catalog:

https://www.edelweiss.plus/#catalogID=4426756

Edited by Jussi

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2 hours ago, Jussi said:

williamjm: It is the first book in a new prequel trilogy:

I'm not sure how I feel about that based on the other prequels he's done recently, I did like Dancer's Lament a lot and also liked Deadhouse Landing but thought Kellanved's Reach felt very rushed and failed to live up to its potential. I think I might have been more interested in something set in the 'present day' of the Malazan world.

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1 hour ago, williamjm said:

something set in the 'present day' of the Malazan world

It's a pretty big world; seems like there's plenty of room to tell stories from the past. 

It seems like now that the main 'cycle' is done, Erikson's focussing on future narratives while Cam excavates the past. 

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Strangely enough, I've enjoyed Esselmont's recent stuff a lot more than I ever did the Erickson doorstops....

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I got a good giggle out of the GRRM and Rothfuss hope.

I've too much to read that already out to get over-excited about many things. So much stuff.

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On 1/22/2020 at 5:43 PM, BigFatCoward said:

Hunger games prequel based around Snow. Can everyone say meh?

Lol. I'm actually looking forward to it.

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On 12/5/2019 at 5:18 AM, AncalagonTheBlack said:

Agency is due to be published in January 2020 by Berkley (North America) and Viking (UK).

Here’s the synopsis:

A science fiction thriller heavily influenced by our most current events.

I am reading this now. Plowed through nearly 100 pages over the course of a few hours. Lots of short chapters; very pacey feel to the text. Don't know where it's all leading, and enjoying the jumps between the present and the future. A nicely-edited text - particularly at the structural level. 

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On 12/4/2019 at 10:18 AM, AncalagonTheBlack said:

THE GLASS HOTEL by Emily St. John Mandel (Knopf)

 

I can dig it.

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Thanks to @Jussi for bringing this to my attention in the cover art thread, but Naomi Novik is releasing the first in a new trilogy this September, A Deadly Education

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A Deadly Education is set at Scholomance, a school for the magically gifted where failure means certain death (for real) — until one girl, El, begins to unlock its many secrets. There are no teachers, no holidays, and no friendships, save strategic ones. Survival is more important than any letter grade, for the school won’t allow its students to leave until they graduate… or die! The rules are deceptively simple: Don’t walk the halls alone. And beware of the monsters who lurk everywhere. El is uniquely prepared for the school’s dangers. She may be without allies, but she possesses a dark power strong enough to level mountains and wipe out millions. It would be easy enough for El to defeat the monsters that prowl the school. The problem? Her powerful dark magic might also kill all the other students.

 

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14 hours ago, HelenaExMachina said:

Thanks to @Jussi for bringing this to my attention in the cover art thread, but Naomi Novik is releasing the first in a new trilogy this September, A Deadly Education

 

It’s Harry Potter meets Deadly Class.

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16 hours ago, HelenaExMachina said:

There are no teachers, no holidays, and no friendships, save strategic ones. Survival is more important than any letter grade, for the school won’t allow its students to leave until they graduate… or die!

I hope that there is a satisfying explanation regarding who wants the products of such an education and why. Grossman's "The Magicians" never managed to do so, since it depicted the lives of graduates as a state of terminal, idle ennui, which made it really hard to care or understand why the school even existed. Nobody seemed to get anything out of it except for the students during their enrollment and, arguably, the faculty.

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