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21 hours ago, kairparavel said:

@Isis

Is there a chance she meant 'I wish we would have had a chance to discuss this first, so we could have reviewed professional training opportunities more suited to our goals for you.' or some such thing. Not that you completed that training, but that you had a desire or expectation that ultimately doesn't align with theirs and something mutually beneficial could have been lined up instead? Of course, she probably should have expressed that, if it's the case. 

 

It's always good to walk into these conversations with a charitable assumption about the others motives and let them explain themselves. 

I am an employer, and tbh I would be disappointed as well (and I have been in that situation), even if would have avoided putting it in writing. Maybe my reasons will help you in your reply, maybe it doesn't apply at all to your situation:

1. I support and fund extra qualifications and training and if any employee would rather not speak to me about their training and qualification even to a point where it means that they forego employer funding which can easily be in the thousands of Euros, I'd ask myself wether this person actually wants to work with me. On an emotional level, I would probably feel it as a personal slight, that they would't want to discuss their plans with me. But then again, we are a small, more close-knit firm. So there's perhaps an element of personal hurt feelings in there, depending what kind of HoD she is and how her leadership-style is.

2. If know beforehand what the actual qualification plans are, I can discuss which qualifications are useful, which ones aren't and how the training could be integrated in the work, i.e. picking projects, clients and internal tasks accordingly. People who have the kind of motivation to do additional training, self-funded an in their own time are a valuable ressource. They are those who keep the wheels turning. So from an employer perspective, the disappointment is that you have "wasted" a qualification run and are now more likely to go looking for another job, because your qualification doesn't match your focus at work. As an employer you want to channel that motivation into a training that will make an employee with a great work attitude even more valuable - not more likely to quit.  So that would be disappointing in the sense of a missed opportunity to find a more mutually beneficial training and qualification. 

So in summary, I don't think that the expression of disappointment is overstepping as such - especially as you have brought up the topic yourself and have therefore opend the subject to discussion. Your best path forward is probably just asking why she feels disappointed and wait what kind of response you'll get. 

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On 4/11/2021 at 2:01 PM, kairparavel said:

@Isis

Is there a chance she meant 'I wish we would have had a chance to discuss this first, so we could have reviewed professional training opportunities more suited to our goals for you.' or some such thing. Not that you completed that training, but that you had a desire or expectation that ultimately doesn't align with theirs and something mutually beneficial could have been lined up instead? Of course, she probably should have expressed that, if it's the case. 

 

There is always back story. I actually expressed an interest in doing some 'training about training' in 2019. I was told I could do a one day external course (funded by work). As the date drew closer I got told I couldn't do it as someone else was off on leave that day and I had to wait 21 months. I said, 'don't worry, I'm going to do the certificate and fund it myself'. (i.e. course my HoD is upset about now). The response was, 'no, don't do that, you can go ahead and do the one day course. Now, the HoD has official responsibility for training in our department. I can only guess they don't want me treading on their toes. But just because I have the same qualification as them now doesn't devalue theirs!

So, no, there was no money or approval for me to do this training from my employers. Had I gone to my boss and said btw, 'I want to do this course with my own time and money, just letting you know' and they said 'oh no, don't do that' - I still would have done it. It is something I was very interested in doing and I am glad I did it. I have gained skills which I will likely use in doing the training that gets dumped on me in my current role because I am good at it, even though my boss doesn't want to give me credit for that... 

So it's a win: win for my boss - from a service delivery point of view.

Another part of the HoD response was 'I don't see training as part of your reponsibilites, your additional responsibility is health and safety and I would like you to focus on that'. That's fine. I am focused on it. 

But the fact remains that I don't need permission to do personal development with my own time and money when it has zero impact on my work and I am not asking for it to change my role. I am absolutely still performing my agreed role. 

What about if I took a course in flower arranging or creative writing? Am I obliged to discuss that with my boss before I spend my own time and money on it? Where do we draw the line? 

Thank you for the responses, it is definitely useful to get these different perspectives. I appreciate that. I am still musing on my own response...

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@Isis - I am in line with your perspective - if I want to do something because my employer doesn’t have the funding for it, and it’s in my professional interest, it really should be none of their business. 

You mentioned it to them, though, and they decided they wanted drama.

You might consider looking for a new job. My guess is that your department head now feels threatened.

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On 4/11/2021 at 5:05 PM, Iskaral Pust said:

This is how I read it too @Isis, but I think your best path here is to ask the HoD why they’re disappointed about this.  Use a non-accusatory tone: “I’m surprised that you are disappointed that I would pursue extra development on my own time and at my own cost.  Can you help me see why?”

Also, do some self-assessment of your feelings here before you go into that conversation.  This sounds like a much bigger deal to you than to the HoD.  It sounds like you have a sense of ownership and of ambition in this area, neither of which are easy to let go.  Do you resent that the HoD did not endorse your ownership and ambition?  Do you feel disrespected because of this?   Does the HoD have a different view of your capabilities/potential than you?  Or a different view of what would be the most valuable contribution to the team? e.g. have you prioritized something that you like but isn’t aligned with HoD’s priorities for the group?  Why did you not share your intention before doing the training?

Make sure you understand the ultimate issue before you start discussing the proximate issue.

To answer your specific question, I don’t think the HoD has over-stepped to express disappointment, unless that manifests as some sort of censure.  Disappointment is just a feeling and everyone is entitled to have them, just not to impose them on others.  I don’t think they could use this as a negative in your performance assessment, but they may view it negatively on how you’re approaching your development plan and how much they want to invest in your development.  That separation of jurisdiction is important.

Best of luck.  

Your initial point is exactly what I was planning to do - ask for clarification on why this would be a problem (rather than it being a plus from a business perspective).

In fact, it is the HoD who has the ownership issues here. They are a controlling, micro-managing person. And from this meeting I have discovered that they feel that training belongs to them and they don't want anyone else on their territory (even though it would be beneficial to them and lessen their workload). This issue genuinely was a minor point in a meeting about much bigger things (what is required for my promotion to the next grade; the more senior position I can apply for when the current incumbent retires; my intent to obtain dual registration as a more advanced type of healthcare scientist). So that's another reason it's kind of weird that their response was so negative. It should have just been something we brushed off in the remote meeting, i.e. 'I would have preferred if you had spoken to me about this first' and I say ok. The end. We leave it there. But no! They had to double down on it in the written follow up to the meeting, compounding what I see as an error of judgment on their part.

My HoD's MO is to automatically tell me that I am doing too much and shouldn't take on anything else. Even though I have been saying for YEARS that I am under utilised and under challenged. I literally said in the meeting 'the only challenging thing about my role is the workload'. But the de facto response to any enquiries I make about my development is that they get shut down. Quashed. So this is why I do my own stuff outside of work. Work are totally cool with using all the skills I gain in my wider (outside of work) development. HoD even confirmed this in the same email - how invaluable I have been to help with X, because I have skills nobody else has. They are happy to take from me. They just don't want to give.

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Was successful in my interview few weeks ago, so my secondment as Strategic Workforce Planning Analyst is now permanent (once HR send me the paperwork). Main reason the temp position had to be advertised internally was that its also being upped a paygrade :D

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Posted (edited)

Hiring people you know. What’s your take on it? Is it unfair?

I’m in the process of trying to get a job in my company for someone who served under me previously in a different career. I know him. He’s a dedicated worker who doesn’t slack off. I’m 100% sure he will do the job above and beyond what is expected of him, and  I’m going to do everything in my power to make sure he gets the position. 
 

Should I feel bad about myself? I’m going to do it anyway. Just need to know if I should feel bad about myself.  

Edited by A True Kaniggit

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Posted (edited)
50 minutes ago, A True Kaniggit said:

Hiring people you know. What’s your take on it? Is it unfair?

I’m in the process of trying to get a job in my company for someone who served under me previously in a different career. I know him. He’s a dedicated worker who doesn’t slack off. I’m 100% sure he will do the job above and beyond what is expected of him, and  I’m going to do everything in my power to make sure he gets the position. 
 

Should I feel bad about myself? I’m going to do it anyway. Just need to know if I should feel bad about myself.  

No way you should feel bad. This is what ‘networking’ is all about. You know him from a professional setting. It’s not getting your drinking buddy a job because he’s hilarious after a couple shots. You have confidence in his ability to do the job because you’ve seen him do a different job. The only reason we have headhunters and sites like indeed is to help hiring managers sort out who appears to be qualified for a given position. If you have personally seen those characteristics demonstrated that is more valuable than any blind candidate search or interview process ever could be, IMO.

Edited by S John

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1 hour ago, A True Kaniggit said:

Hiring people you know. What’s your take on it? Is it unfair?

I’m in the process of trying to get a job in my company for someone who served under me previously in a different career. I know him. He’s a dedicated worker who doesn’t slack off. I’m 100% sure he will do the job above and beyond what is expected of him, and  I’m going to do everything in my power to make sure he gets the position. 
 

Should I feel bad about myself? I’m going to do it anyway. Just need to know if I should feel bad about myself.  

Definitely good to hire people who you already know are reliable, talented, etc.  That’s so much better than basing a decision on interviews.

One suggestion, though, is to at least look at some other candidates, especially internal colleagues looking for a step upward.  The one downside of everyone hiring someone they already know is that it tends to exclude people at the periphery of the collective network, e.g. young people, women, minorities.

Besides, if your friend arrived into a position that other colleagues didn’t even have a chance at, there could be resentment. 

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1 hour ago, A True Kaniggit said:

Hiring people you know. What’s your take on it? Is it unfair?

I’m in the process of trying to get a job in my company for someone who served under me previously in a different career. I know him. He’s a dedicated worker who doesn’t slack off. I’m 100% sure he will do the job above and beyond what is expected of him, and  I’m going to do everything in my power to make sure he gets the position. 
 

Should I feel bad about myself? I’m going to do it anyway. Just need to know if I should feel bad about myself.  

Ummmmm - EXACTLY what has just been said, above, by Isk and S John. 
 

Do not feel bad about yourself at all.

You might want to take the perfunctory search for 3 days for any interested internal candidates, so you can check the box, just to play the politics right. Typically, no internal candidates - or only unqualified ones - show up for this, so you’re just covering bases.

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I don't know. I have experienced that a couple of times. A new director swoops in, brings a couple of mates from their former company and basically leaves scorched earth behind after a year or two. Then his mates are also gone except for the ones who are even too weak to follow the director again.

There was this one case where the director of sales EMEA came in from our biggest competitor (after the competitor stopped competing in this field) and did what highly payed sales team is supposed to do. Which is apparently raking up a astronomical T&L bill and selling for exactly 0 Euro. After that he has been reorganized away from the company and all of his mates either followed him or moved to other competitors. Leaving a big mess behind and of course no bonus for us because we depend on their sales success.

In short, I will be very careful working with new managers if they bring in their mates. They are like locust.

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