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R.I.P. Thread: A Celebration Of Lives Well Lived

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2 hours ago, BigFatCoward said:

The break out star of the greatest and most important TV show of all time. 

Off to watch him school Levy one more time. 

Completely agree here. What an absolute shame and tragedy. He was a fantastic actor and was only 54.

I started watching The Wire again after hearing this news. Brilliant right from the start.

What a loss.

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That sucks. I loved him in everything I saw him in. He was someone you genuinely believed was his character, not acting like a character.

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I don't normally feel that hit of grief like they were someone I actually knew, but this one hurts

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6 hours ago, JEORDHl said:

 

Damn, his final words here hit hard. Celebrate his life by visiting his works, will put Hap and Leonard on the watch-list.

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51 minutes ago, Teng Ai Hui said:

Very sad news.

It's been too long since I watched The Wire.  It's time to do a rewatch.

I just started a rewatch two days ago.  Fucking brutal.

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The Night Of, the Wire and Chalky White on Boardwalk Empire. This feels like Gandolfini, in that way where you always thought another great performance was in the pipeline.....

We were spoiled.

R.i.p. Omar

Edited by DireWolfSpirit

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I agree with others that he was just as good as Chalky White as we was as Omar - even though I stopped watching Boardwalk after the second season.  He was also pretty damn hilarious during his stint on Community.

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David Simon on Michael K. Williams, who, after reading Season 2 scripts, asked, "Why are we even doing this?"

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/12/opinion/michael-k-williams-david-simon-the-wire.html?

[paywall]

Quote

 

. . . . To Mike, at that moment, we were the white custodians of a rare majority-Black drama in the majority-white world of American television, and we might well be walking away from that unique responsibility.

He was asking a big question. To answer, I had to pause and regroup, and reach for an honest answer — the one less likely to please a hungry actor. I told him that we had never imagined “The Wire” as a Black drama, or even as a drama with race as its central theme. We were writing about how power and money are routed in an American city, and being from Baltimore, a majority Black metropolis, we had simply depicted our hometown.

And a bigger truth, I argued, is that if we don’t now expand the show’s field of vision beyond what happens on the streets of West Baltimore, then we stay a cops-and-robbers drama, a police procedural. But if we build the rest of the city — its fragile working class, its political world, its schools, its media culture — then we get a chance to say something more.

“We want to have a bigger argument about what has gone wrong. Not just in Baltimore, but elsewhere, too.”

Mike thought about this for a long moment. Waiting for him, I still worried it would come down to his character’s work. He had done marvelous things with Omar — his smile and the cavernous barrel of a high-powered handgun were the closing moments of the first season — and he was maybe one more good story arc from elevating his character into a star turn. With the leverage he had already acquired, Mike could have sat there and insisted on the writers gilding his every narrative arc.

Instead, he stood up, curled the early season two scripts in his hand, nodded, and asked one last question:

“So what is this stuff at the port about? What are we going to say?”

It’s about the death of work, I told him. When legitimate work itself dies in an American city, I argued, and the last factory standing is the drug corners, then everyone goes to a corner. . . .

 

 

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1 hour ago, Morpheus said:

RIP Norm MacDonald

What a talented comedian, a master of the shaggy dog story.

He was one of Conan's favorite guests and always had him rolling. People thought that Conan had turned a cold shoulder to him for not having him on for his finale on TBS, because of some controversy or other, but I'm guessing that he was in no shape for it these last months. Such a shame.

 

Edited by Ran

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Damn. Norm may very well be the king of awkward deadpan. Truly a comedic legend that will be missed.

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My intro to Norm was through Family Guy, when he was voicing Death in the first couple of sesons. I also saw brief bits of him on SNL, never really watched that religiously(have to rewatch his stuff now for sure); but his ‘98 film Dirty Work was one of the films that made me cry from laughing so hard. Pure comedic genius.

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17 minutes ago, RumHam said:

He was a really great Weekend Update host. 

Amen.  I loved him on the Weekend Update.

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Norm was definitely my favorite Weekend Update host.  His set and behavior at the Bob Saget roast also remains one of my favorite contributions on one of those things.  I even loved Dirty Work.

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