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Canon Claude

I can't believe it took me this long to realise...

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It's so strange to me that I missed the symbolism of the Frey/Crannogmen feud. 

It always seemed odd to me that the Freys would even bother feuding with the crannogmen, because how would those two groups ever interact? The crannogmen are supposed to be isolated and remote at the best of times, and the Freys know that the Neck belongs to the North, plus there is zero reason for Freys to try and claim the Neck anyway. I just chalked it up to making Andals and the Seven worshippers into racists as opposed to the good boy Bran who treats them with due courtesy. 

But it just hit me. The Freys were built up big time as important allies crucial to Robb Stark's victories in the Riverlands. Sure, we don't necessarily like them much, but they're very important. And the first time we meet anyone from the Neck, it's Meera and Jojen Reed, the children of Howland Reed come to reaffirm their oaths to Winterfell. Bran spends a lot of time with both the Freys and the Reeds, and the results are a great foreshadowing to the later books. The Freys are taken in by Theon Greyjoy when he betrays the Starks, and then they become wards of Ramsay Snow, a member of House Bolton and another traitor to the Starks. The Reeds, meanwhile, prove to be the true allies, the ones who bring Bran to his destiny. 

And it doesn't end there; Robb's campaign depends on mending ties with House Frey in ASOS, but Robb also plans to team up with House Reed when he rides against Moat Cailin. People are, once again, quick to question Robb's trust in the crannogmen, even his own bannermen, and Robb simply affirms that his father knew the worth of Howland Reed. And this time, House Frey openly betrays him alongside the Boltons. 

I feel like it's a bit of a reach, but if GRRM meant that, then I applaud him.

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yeah, good one CC, i like your analysis on the analogy. 


another great reason as to why we read this stuff. 
can't wait for more stuff.
bring it on GRRM - bring it on Wordsmith Man - we are ready

 

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I can dig it.

It's very much an Andal/First Men comparison as well, if you look at the position of House Stark throughout the series itself. House Stark's children are half Stark and half Tully, and most of them look more Tully than Stark. All of them waver between these identities for a time (except Rickon, he's always been wolfish) and every one of them which goes for a southron identity is doomed to suffer.  Robb turns on his direwolf and ignores Grey Wind's warning about the Freys' imminent betrayal. However, he did one last smart thing before he died, by putting his faith in Howland Reed regarding the keeping of his will and the safekeeping of Galbart Glover and Maege Mormont. They're both presumably still alive, and still aware of their king's last wishes. Meanwhile, Bran puts his faith in the Reeds, and he's safe and sound exactly where he needs to be regarding the incoming threat of the Others, but before that, he was full of talk about going south and becoming a knight. 

The Frey vs Reed feud is full of symbolism regarding the fate of House Stark and the path which the wolf pack must walk if it's going to survive.

Edited by Floki of the Ironborn

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