Jump to content
Darzin

The future of Catholicism

Recommended Posts

One thing to think about as to the role of women in pre-Islamic Arabia -- Muhammed's first wife was his boss's daughter; she was instrumental in managing in the trading the business in which he was employed.

Generally in nomadic societies women are in charge of the commercial activities of the family, clan and tribe, in everything from manufacture, to overseeing the markets, doing the actual buying and selling.  This was the case on the Eurasian steppes including the various Hordic groups, the Turks, including those out of whom the Ottoman dynasty arose.  And even after converting to Islam, those Hordic groups who converted (others became Christians, some even Jewish) to Islam, women remained in charge of the commercial side of their lives.  The Byzantines's upper class women though, were generally very much kept out of public life by the later days -- unless empresses and the like, which is true everywhere and time.  

There are also notable female warriors among these tribes before and after Islam.

If I'm recalling correctly -- it was the groups who conquered Egypt in the 7th century, which evolved eventually into the  - Mamluk dynasties, then the Janissary dynasties, where women tended to be kept at home.

But it was astonishing how much business could be and was transacted by women behind harem walls, as long as they had the capital to get started. Even there money made huge distinctions as what one could or could not do, just as in monasteries and convents.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Classy. Really working to stay relevant to the younger generations.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
22 hours ago, Zorral said:

One thing to think about as to the role of women in pre-Islamic Arabia -- Muhammed's first wife was his boss's daughter; she was instrumental in managing in the trading the business in which he was employed.

Generally in nomadic societies women are in charge of the commercial activities of the family, clan and tribe, in everything from manufacture, to overseeing the markets, doing the actual buying and selling.  This was the case on the Eurasian steppes including the various Hordic groups, the Turks, including those out of whom the Ottoman dynasty arose.  And even after converting to Islam, those Hordic groups who converted (others became Christians, some even Jewish) to Islam, women remained in charge of the commercial side of their lives.  The Byzantines's upper class women though, were generally very much kept out of public life by the later days -- unless empresses and the like, which is true everywhere and time.  

There are also notable female warriors among these tribes before and after Islam.

If I'm recalling correctly -- it was the groups who conquered Egypt in the 7th century, which evolved eventually into the  - Mamluk dynasties, then the Janissary dynasties, where women tended to be kept at home.

But it was astonishing how much business could be and was transacted by women behind harem walls, as long as they had the capital to get started. Even there money made huge distinctions as what one could or could not do, just as in monasteries and convents.

 

 

 

I think one might see women doing a lot of work, in violent societies, that would be done by men in more peaceful societies.  Where violent death amongst men is very common, it makes sense for women to have important roles as property owners and merchants. Sparta was one such, which almost uniquely among Grek city states allowed women to own land.  That made sense in a society where the role of male citizens was to be full time soldiers

Edited by SeanF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, SeanF said:

I think one might see women doing a lot of work, in violent societies, that would be done by men in more peaceful societies.  Where violent death amongst men is very common, it makes sense for women to have important roles as property owners and merchants. Sparta was one such, which almost uniquely among Grek city states allowed women to own land.  That made sense in a society where the role of male citizens was to be full time soldiers

In most African cultures, particularly those of West Africa -- long before either the Muslims or the "Christians" arrived, women ran the markets and oversaw the market places.  The presiding deities to whom the markets are sacred, are gendered female -- and are to this day.  To this day, particularly in cultures of Nigeria, Ghana, Benin, etc., women are still in charge of these matters. These cultures were no more non-peaceable or peaceable than any other.

Many African cultures are, to our eyes these days, extremely gendered as to who or what.  But a lot of that is changing throughout the countries there now, like much else.  And not all of it for the better, particularly the Christian evangelical drive that women are supposed to stay home and out of business -- just like their drive that gay people must be driven out of communities and /or killed.  Or those afflicted with albinoism are witches and must be killed, and so on and so forth.

 

 

Edited by Zorral

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...