Jump to content

Exercise & Fitness: it’s a marathon, not a sprint


Iskaral Pust
 Share

Recommended Posts

8 hours ago, baxus said:

Jogging every single morning might not be as beneficial as you would think, especially if you don't vary your runs a bit. Doing the same workout over and over will rather quickly become less effective than it was at first. I would suggest setting yourself a goal, like a 5k run for start and finding a training programme for it online or maybe even joining a running club/group if there's one nearby.

There are better exercises for your core than sit ups and you can mix and change those as well.

Don't get too focused on running, think about other modes of training. If you're 56kg at 170cm height and still feeling "fat and flabby at the belly" you could be "skinny fat" in which case you'd be better with some sort of weight training to increase your muscle mass. Also, you mention summer break and your height and weight numbers suggest you're still in school (correct me if my assumption is wrong) so timing could be great for weight training, though I'd advise against improvising that yourself or looking things up online. You should get someone to look out for your technique and correct you when needed. I will repeat, look into different things, check what best fits your schedule, what you have available nearby, what friends you could to things with etc. Last but not least, find out what's most fun for you. More fun it is, more likely you'll be to stick with it.

It takes time for workout to give results, and you need to ramp up the intensity levels, not just throw yourself at it and try to tough it out while your body keeps giving you signals to take it easy.

IIRC, Toth is a school teacher. So he probably works a lot at home. If he doesn't have a dedicated office space, the ergonomics is probably poor, i.e. not the ideal posture when sitting in front of the computer, etc. That could be the reason for some of his complaints.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, Toth said:

massive neck pains going on for months now

If it helps, neck pain is often caused directly or indirectly by stress. Reviewing your posture, especially when seated, might be a good idea. I also suggest consulting a physiotherapist if possible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, baxus said:

Don't get too focused on running, think about other modes of training. If you're 56kg at 170cm height and still feeling "fat and flabby at the belly" you could be "skinny fat" in which case you'd be better with some sort of weight training to increase your muscle mass.

That might be it. Well, like Loge says, it's a mixture of lots of sitting, bad posture and... admittedly, also kind of too much sugar in the last year of Covid in order to keep being productive and combat my regular headaches. That combined with the fact that I have been struggling and failing to develop any kind of muscles since forever and kept looking like a stick figure no matter how much I trained. So yeah, I'm going to change my focus to muscle training for the next days.

11 hours ago, Tywin et al. said:

The above advice is spot on. @Toth, I just converted your metrics and I have to ask, have you ever thought about talking to a psychologist? You may very well have some form of body dysmorphia.  

I don't think so. Though I guess this experience now is proof that I might be more vain than I like to admit. Vain the way that I know I'm very ugly and weird looking, but would very much prefer to keep the only positive things I have about my looks and not permanently loose them for whatever reasons. For one my relatively clear skin, which unfortunately has gotten a bit marred by a couple pimple scars over the years and then my high metabolism that until now kept me very skinny no matter what I did. But apparently that has been failing me last winter when I all of a sudden developed a bit of a belly due to an abrupt stop of my exercises and high sugar intake.

Which is why I found this thing with the chin so scary and infuriating. I've just been happy about my more intense regimen showing first successes and my belly going back when this stupid flappy skin monstrosity appeared right out of nowhere from one day to the next. So I googled a bit and found out that it can also happen because of atrophied muscles in neck or jaw and so I did some exercises that were recommended for that. I could be wrong, but oddly enough, this morning it already looked somewhat less extreme than yesterday, so I will keep doing those.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Tywin et al. said:

The above advice is spot on. @Toth, I just converted your metrics and I have to ask, have you ever thought about talking to a psychologist? You may very well have some form of body dysmorphia.  

That was also the impression I got, but I was reluctant to bring it up. I'm hoping it is a case of Toth being too hard on himself  more than anything else.

2 hours ago, Toth said:

That might be it. Well, like Loge says, it's a mixture of lots of sitting, bad posture and... admittedly, also kind of too much sugar in the last year of Covid in order to keep being productive and combat my regular headaches. That combined with the fact that I have been struggling and failing to develop any kind of muscles since forever and kept looking like a stick figure no matter how much I trained. So yeah, I'm going to change my focus to muscle training for the next days.

Not all training leads to gaining muscle mass. If you were jogging, doing sit ups and an occasional push up here and there, I'd be very surprised if it resulted in significant muscle increase. Even if you pick training that does help gain muscle, and stick with it, it would still require changes in diet. When I say "changes in diet", it's not limited to what you can/should and can/should not eat, but HOW MUCH you should eat. Nutrition is a major part of both weight loss and weight gain processes.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Toth said:

I don't think so. Though I guess this experience now is proof that I might be more vain than I like to admit. Vain the way that I know I'm very ugly and weird looking, but would very much prefer to keep the only positive things I have about my looks and not permanently loose them for whatever reasons. For one my relatively clear skin, which unfortunately has gotten a bit marred by a couple pimple scars over the years and then my high metabolism that until now kept me very skinny no matter what I did. But apparently that has been failing me last winter when I all of a sudden developed a bit of a belly due to an abrupt stop of my exercises and high sugar intake.

See, this is just more of the same that leads me to think you should consider making an appointment. We're all vain to some degree, but the way you're describing yourself comes off as extreme and probably not representative of how you really look.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Tywin et al. said:

See, this is just more of the same that leads me to think you should consider making an appointment. We're all vain to some degree, but the way you're describing yourself comes off as extreme and probably not representative of how you really look.

This isn't just me saying this, this is classmates of mine back in the days reacting shocked when they saw my parents, wondering why I look like I do while they look normal. That's girls telling me not to smile because it makes me look like Mr. Bean. And even my current batch of students reacting shocked when they saw me for the first time without mask, saying I look better with it.

Anyway, I'm keeping on with the current regimen + new exercises I looked up online. Quite sore at the hip and the belly right now, but I guess that means it's working.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The thing is that your comments come off as if you let how others perceive your physical appearance have a significant impact on how you feel. My impression could be wrong, of course. It would be far from the first time that happened.

As far as girls telling you not to smile are concerned, you should tell them they can fuck right off. You don't smile or laugh or whatever for their benefit, it's your mood and your emotion and it's none of their business.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, baxus said:

As far as girls telling you not to smile are concerned, you should tell them they can fuck right off. You don't smile or laugh or whatever for their benefit, it's your mood and your emotion and it's none of their business.

Okay, fair enough, they just pointed it out and laughed about it, it was my takeaway to avoid smiling from then on. Also that was more than a decade ago, so... I mean, this exchange in particular wasn't even with people who were hostile with me, so it was an honest assessment.

1 hour ago, baxus said:

The thing is that your comments come off as if you let how others perceive your physical appearance have a significant impact on how you feel. My impression could be wrong, of course. It would be far from the first time that happened.

... and my physical appearance has an impact on the perception of which I am getting a feedback for, so that line of thinking doesn't get me anywhere.

Also replaced situps with crunches now after I learned in addition to your suggestions that they explicitly train the muscles at the sides instead of the belly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lots of swimming for me lately as I try to maximize the limited season, plus it feels amazing in the water during this hot period. But now we have a problem with our pool cover that will take at least a couple of days to get fixed.

I finally got back in the gym yesterday and today.  I was shocked how strong I felt at squats in only my second session in two months but I had no time to add extra sets.  Bench press and rowing went fine today but still lacking time to add anything extra.  Deadlifts tomorrow is the plan, time permitting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Toth I remember you were struggling a year ago to establish a good exercise regime.  (Am I right that you’re a teacher and the summer is when you have time to focus on this?).

I think Baxus and Tywin gave good advice.  You seem like someone who would benefit a lot from a consistent exercise regime that would boost your self confidence and self image.  If you’re underweight and skinny-fat and trying to improve the perception of your physical appearance, then the good news is that there are many, many others in the same situation and there is a proven path to improve upon that: just take a look at one of the beginner’s weightlifting programs, usually involving a 5-6 days per week of weight training plus a diet with a calorie surplus and a high % of protein.    (I believe I’ve heard of Strong Lifts and 5x5 as specific programs, but there are several available for free on bodybuilding.com).  I think you’ll be amazed at how you carry yourself and see yourself once you start seeing improvements in your strength and physicality, plus the extra endorphins help too.

If, as you said above, you’re ready to start weightlifting, then make sure you approach it with a disciplined plan.  Avoid fuckarounditis (feel free to Google that).  Don’t waste your time and effort.  Definitely don’t be one of those guys doing arm curls in a squat rack who never add any muscle mass.  Prepare a program for yourself and be intentional in your workouts and you’ll see results in just a few months.  Consistency is really important though, and I realize that I have my own long struggle with consistency, so do as I say not as I do.

Best of luck.

If you need help sticking with consistency then come and post your progress here each week.  This is a group that’s very supportive.  Any progress is to be celebrated and built upon.  Any disappointments or hurdles are just part of the process: don’t get too down, just pick yourself back up and get back to it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Iskaral Pust said:

 You seem like someone who would benefit a lot from a consistent exercise regime that would boost your self confidence and self image.  If you’re underweight and skinny-fat and trying to improve the perception of your physical appearance, then the good news is that there are many, many others in the same situation and there is a proven path to improve upon that: just take a look at one of the beginner’s weightlifting programs, usually involving a 5-6 days per week of weight training plus a diet with a calorie surplus and a high % of protein.

Ugh...

Well, to be honest, right now with my focus on diet and a mixture of cardio and muscle exercises I feel like I'm already getting results in the skinny-fat department. Even if that totally makes me a "fuckarounditis" victim. I've looked up weightlifting programs and a rant about fuckarounditis after reading your reply and... ugh... I'm sorry, it might sound ridiculous, but I really, really, really don't want to go to a gym and start weightlifting. I don't think my accumulated fear of getting judged and ridiculed and yelled at because that's all I connect with sports is going to take that. I just can't handle anyone looking at me. It's already bad enough when out jogging and I have to keep interrupting my training at home whenever my mother barges in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Toth said:

 I just can't handle anyone looking at me. It's already bad enough when out jogging and I have to keep interrupting my training at home whenever my mother barges in.

I don't want to amatuer analyse you or drag anyone's mother, but from everything you have said on this board, you would be 99% happier if you moved out. Even if all you can afford is a tiny room in a crack den. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Toth said:

I'm sorry, it might sound ridiculous, but I really, really, really don't want to go to a gym and start weightlifting. I don't think my accumulated fear of getting judged and ridiculed and yelled at because that's all I connect with sports is going to take that.

This might seem counterintuitive, but I'd say that's exactly why you should go to a gym. To make the matter even more outrageous, I'd suggest crossfit. Working out in a group has major benefits and I've never seen a group of people as supportive of their workout fellows as crossfiters. No one would yell at you, except to encourage you. There was a saying about crossfit that it's the sport where those who finish last get the loudest cheers. Obviously, you would need to do a pretty thorough research in order to find a good gym (or box or whatever) with good coaches in your area. After that, you'd have to listen to those coaches even (or especially) when you believe your can do more or lift heavier or run faster or whatever.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He's trying to recruit you into a cult! Run away as fast as you can! :P

But in all seriousness group fitness isn't a bad idea as it allows you to blend into the crowd and overall people are not very judgmental these days at gyms. Everyone knows you have to start somewhere and people are more likely to offer help/advice than look down at you. This isn't the 80's.

Edited by Tywin et al.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

To echo Baxus and Tywin again, gyms are usually very supportive places, including for newbies.  They are not like getting picked last for a sports team at school.  Everyone in a gym was a beginner once and most of them are happy and slightly nostalgic to see someone taking their first steps. Just learn the basic etiquette first to use the common space in a courteous way.

I went to my first gym at university.  A new friend who was competing as a sprinter talked me into joining him as a training partner.  I remember that initial hesitation to enter a world where I would be the weakest know-nothing.  I felt it again when I joined my first commercial gym and was going there alone — and despite keeping to myself, wary of intruding in this space, all of the regulars were incredibly nice to me and initiated ongoing friendly conversations after a few weeks.  In my experience, most weightlifters are introverted, deeply attached to their exercise lifestyle, and walking a knife’s edge between self-improvement and insecurity with a spirit of camaraderie.  If you ever encounter macho posturing that feels like the original Cobra Kai, then just walk down the street to a different gym.  That kind of toxic attitude is pretty rare because beginners won’t pay to join that — remember, all gyms survive financially on monthly subscriptions by people who want to be there but don’t regularly make the effort to actually get there.

But even if you just want to do calisthenics at home — which is fine, albeit less effective — then at least plan an intentional program for yourself.  Fuckarounditis will not produce results.  Learn from the mistakes of many others before you.

Good luck.  Everyone feels better when they are exercising regularly.  Just read some of Theda’s posts in this thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So even if I assume that gyms are indeed these mythical places where hypercompetitive masculine bullshittery doesn't take place (despite all my experiences with athletes and 'pumpers' being the absolute opposite, this "spirit of camaraderie" is always just hazing), I don't have the time anyway. In an ordinary work week I don't even get to jog, so how the hell am I supposed to make space for regular gym visits? It would be a waste of money for a commitment I am simply not able to stick to.

This is a hard no on that one. My current regimen shows results and I am happy with that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm honestly puzzled by this picture of a gym that you are painting. I've been to many, many gyms and while they varied in size, shape, and equipment, they were almost always stocked full of people just...working out and minding their own business. And no I don't want camaraderie, I just want to be left alone, and I think 99% of other weight-lifters are the same (unless you are intentionally choosing a gym that advertises that--like Crossfit). About the only time I interact with other people at the gym is to ask "are you done with this?" and even that is pretty rare.

In any case, if you don't want to go the gym, don't go. But some sort of program is likely to be beneficial to you unless you spend a lot of time becoming educated in exercise science. Which is a bit of a waste when so many people have already done that work. If you're really into calisthenics, I'd recommend checking out r/bodyweightfitness and their (very thorough) Recommended Routine.

Also...therapy. If you're this anxious about people looking at you, definitely therapy. (I say that with no malice--I myself have major depressive disorder and general anxiety disorder.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Toth said:

So even if I assume that gyms are indeed these mythical places where hypercompetitive masculine bullshittery doesn't take place (despite all my experiences with athletes and 'pumpers' being the absolute opposite, this "spirit of camaraderie" is always just hazing), I don't have the time anyway. In an ordinary work week I don't even get to jog, so how the hell am I supposed to make space for regular gym visits? It would be a waste of money for a commitment I am simply not able to stick to.

I’m glad you’re seeing results with a self-created regimen - the important thing is to make that non-negotiable and that you always stick to your schedule - this is really hard to do on your own, but not impossible.  Even then, I think it’s going to be difficult to build any muscle without access to some equipment, but there are some good bodyweight routines out there, you just have to try to find something to work for you.

I’ll echo everyone else’s experience and say that your perception of gyms sound like they are solely based on 80s films and maybe a shitty experience with a musclehead before you became an adult.  Shop around.

Gyms give you access to equipment that will make working out more interesting and help you see better results (weights especially).  And the financial commitment keeps many showing up to use the service, instead of half-assing, not tracking progress/keeping to a plan, or quitting. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Starkess said:

I'm honestly puzzled by this picture of a gym that you are painting. I've been to many, many gyms and while they varied in size, shape, and equipment, they were almost always stocked full of people just...working out and minding their own business. And no I don't want camaraderie, I just want to be left alone, and I think 99% of other weight-lifters are the same (unless you are intentionally choosing a gym that advertises that--like Crossfit). About the only time I interact with other people at the gym is to ask "are you done with this?" and even that is pretty rare.

Yeah, I’ll second this. I’m struggling to remember an occasion when someone has even spoken to me at the gym if they weren’t an employee or I didn’t already know them. :dunno:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...