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UK Politics - We Don’t Want to See Your Papers, Please

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4 hours ago, Zorral said:

Yes it is.  It's also used in other ways too, particularly when it comes to speaking of US history, culture and politics.  Also in the UK, when discussing these matters.

'Scotch-Irish' influence on US democracy"

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-45487891

‘Scotch’ is an offensive and derogatory term when used in reference to Scots. Whether Americans use it or not is irrelevant. The BBC article puts it in quotes to indicate it’s not their term.

And in any case, the BBC’s relationship with elements of Scotland has not been without tension. There are many pro-Indie Scots who’ve not forgotten the BBC’s pro-union bias during the referendum.

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5 hours ago, Zorral said:

Yes it is.  It's also used in other ways too, particularly when it comes to speaking of US history, culture and politics.  Also in the UK, when discussing these matters.

'Scotch-Irish' influence on US democracy"

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-45487891

It isn't used by Scots, and surely that is the relevant point.

Anyone in the US who describes themselves as being of 'Scotch' descent is, I hate to say, making themselves a figure of fun in Scotland. In Scotland, the term is applied pretty much exclusively to food and drink items. People are Scots, or Scottish.

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Scotch wha hae wi Wallace bled, Scotch wham Bruce has aften led …

It’s got a bit of a ring to it.

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1 hour ago, mormont said:

Anyone in the US who describes themselves as being of 'Scotch' descent is, I hate to say, making themselves a figure of fun in Scotland. In Scotland, the term is applied pretty much exclusively to food and drink items. People are Scots, or Scottish.


No no no, mormont, you must accept the American way. American's views are the most important and we mustn't upset them by pointing out when they're being dumb about something.

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7 hours ago, Zorral said:

Yes it is.  It's also used in other ways too, particularly when it comes to speaking of US history, culture and politics.  Also in the UK, when discussing these matters.

'Scotch-Irish' influence on US democracy"

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-45487891

Fucking yanks. :P

Edited by Spockydog

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14 hours ago, williamjm said:

Yes, there has certainly been plenty of violence due to this over the years even if not on the same scale as in Northern Ireland.

And they do not spare the children. Along with my brother and sister, I spent a year-and-a-half living in a children's home in the west of Scotland. We were the only Catholics. It was horrific.

ETA: As Hannibal Lecter might have told me later, "Toughened your knuckles, didn't it?" 

It certainly did. If not for Father Callaghan, a terrifying, alcoholic ex-boxer turned Jesuit priest, I might not have got out of there alive. He taught me how to fight, and believe me, I had to. All because my parents had me indoctrinated into an abhorrent religious sect I barely understood and had no interest in.

Edited by Spockydog

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1 hour ago, mormont said:

Anyone in the US who describes themselves as being of 'Scotch' descent is, I hate to say, making themselves a figure of fun in Scotland. In Scotland, the term is applied pretty much exclusively to food and drink items. People are Scots, or Scottish.

Plenty of the KKK wankers that Neil Oliver was getting tumescent over in his documentary described themselves as being of Scotch descent. Morons.

 

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Who on earth do they think is falling for this shit? Oh, that's right, the British electorate keeps falling for this shit. 

 

Edited by Spockydog

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If Northerners want any new school buildings that aren't made from decrepit 1980s railway carriages, they have to do battle with Dr Robotnik and defeat him fifty-five times. 

Edited by Spockydog

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4 minutes ago, Werthead said:

So when they level up, do they get +2 to attack and 4 more hitpoints?

Governments love coming up with buzz phrases that mean absolutely nothing.

Min/max or multiclass?

Mage, certainly, because Brexit’s the DnD equivelent of dropping a fireball in a confined space filled with your own party and loot.

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8 hours ago, mormont said:

It isn't used by Scots, and surely that is the relevant point.

Anyone in the US who describes themselves as being of 'Scotch' descent is, I hate to say, making themselves a figure of fun in Scotland. In Scotland, the term is applied pretty much exclusively to food and drink items. People are Scots, or Scottish.

Well certainly that is your point.  But you know, they are not in Scotland so they don't care, do they? :dunno:  Also, tell it to Andrew Jackson, why doncha?

So certainly blame the messenger! :read:

Edited by Zorral

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20 minutes ago, Zorral said:

Well certainly that is your point.  But you know, they are not in Scotland so they don't care, do they? :dunno:  Also, tell it to Andrew Jackson, why doncha?

So certainly blame the messenger! :read:

Terrible apology. 

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27 minutes ago, A True Kaniggit said:

Terrible apology. 

Why am I to apologize for informing people in the UK that groups of Americans who claim Scotch Irish heritage call themselves Scotch Irish and have since before the War of Independence, including the family of Andrew Jackson, and so many others, who settled in various parts of Appalachia and what is now known as Tennessee and North Carolina.

It makes no sense to tell me to apologize, because no matter how often you say they are wrong, they claim their heritage that way. As I'm not one of them I cannot even apologize personally.  So ??????

 

Edited by Zorral

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11 minutes ago, Zorral said:

Why am I to apologize for informing people in the UK that groups of Americans who claim Scotch Irish heritage call themselves Scotch Irish and have since before the War of Independence, including the family of Andrew Jackson, and so many others who settled the Tennessee territory?  Color me confused. What have I done to apologize for? This makes no sense.

 

Your first post I could find where it was mentioned is this -

"Also between the Irish American, Scotch Irish US communities with Ireland's Independence Movement -- including buying weapons and providing other assistance."

 

You weren't informing people of anything. You just used the term.

I mean, if someone on the forum referred to Americans as "Americunts" that could be annoying.

Especially if after being politely corrected they then replied, "It's not my fault, other people do that. I'm just passing along the message".

Edited by A True Kaniggit

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It's the no true Scotch man fallacy all over again!

Geeze, even the use of the word for adhesive tape has a pejorative origin, unless this Wikipedia entry is an urban myth https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch_Tape:

Quote

The use of the term Scotch in the name was a pejorative meaning "parsimonious" in the 1920s and 1930s. The brand name Scotch came about around 1925 while Richard Drew was testing his first masking tape to determine how much adhesive he needed to add. The bodyshop painter became frustrated with the sample masking tape and exclaimed, "Take this tape back to those Scotch bosses of yours and tell them to put more adhesive on it!"[7][8] The name was soon applied to the entire line of 3M tapes.

I personally appreciate the education I have received on the topic. I can't ever personally recall using the term in reference to the people of Scotland in the past, but if / when I have heard it used I previously thought it to simply be a benign variation. Now I know it is bigoted, at least as it applies to people in Scotland. So I am now consciously determined to never use it. 

I don't know how it is anywhere else outside of Scotland other than the USA (which I am also now learning for the first time). I don't think it is a common term used here among people of Scottish decent, which includes me though I have never been part of any Scottish cultural groups, so I am genetically descended rather than culturally descended. Though as with my Maori heritage I am hoping to connect more substantially with my cultural roots, I'm just too much of a lazy procrastinator to actually get started rather than just talk about it. I am determined to visit Papa Westray one day to reclaim overlordship of my clan's land.

Edited by The Anti-Targ

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You all continue to attack me for providing factual historical information, as if I'm racing about the innertubz with digital lanterns exclaiming don't say Scot but Scotch. What's a poor boy to do? :rolleyes: Especially as I don't do it personally, only historically, and haven't -- well, probably ever. :crying: :(

 :read:

:cheers:

:idea:

BTW, just for funnsies,  these US Scotch-Irish communities (as they called themselves), in the 19th century and the 20th, raised Big Monies to finance the Irish Independence Movement in so many ways including the militant elements such as the Invincibles, who assassinated Lord Frederick Cavendish and Thomas Burke in Dublin's Phoenix Park in 1882.

 

 

 

Edited by Zorral

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24 minutes ago, Zorral said:

You all continue to attack me for providing factual historical information, as if I'm racing about the innertubz with digital lanterns exclaiming don't say Scot but Scotch. What's a poor boy to do? :rolleyes: Especially as I don't do it personally, only historically, and haven't -- well, probably ever. :crying: :(

 :read:

:cheers:

:idea:

BTW, just for funnsies,  these US Scotch-Irish communities (as they called themselves), in the 19th century and the 20th, raised Big Monies to finance the Irish Independence Movement in so many ways including the militant elements such as the Invincibles, who assassinated Lord Frederick Cavendish and Thomas Burke in Dublin's Phoenix Park in 1882

Bloody Hell. (As an American, am I allowed to say that?)

 "You all" are not attacking you.

I am.

Someone pointed out that Scotch was offensive.

And yet you have tripled down. 

Edited by A True Kaniggit

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