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Quaithe's prophecy : The three betrayals


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During Daenerys Targaryen's storyline in A Clash of Kings, she was confronted by the mysterious masked woman known under the name of Quaithe that she will know treason three times and each for a different reason: one for blood, one for gold and one for love.

Daenerys has already interpretated that the first treason, the one for blood was Mirri Maz Duur's betrayal when Mirri used her magic to heal Khal Drogo but left him in a vegetative state and gave a particulary terrifying end to Rhaego inside Daenerys' womb to prevent the prophecy of the Stallion riding the World to ever come true.

Of course this is Daenerys' own interpretation and it's totally possible that it's not true and that the betrayal for blood has yet to happen, after all it could be argued that Mirri never really betrayed Daenerys since she was never in Daenerys' side and never swore any allegiance to her in the first place .

If not Mirri's actions then what do you think could be the betrayal for blood ? What do you think will be the other two betrayals that Quaithe was alluding to, the one for gold and the one for love ? Who do you think could be the ones doing these treasons, and for which motives and through which means ?

As an additional thought and question, could it be that Daenerys could be the one who'll actually do these three betrayals, or at least one of them in one of the countless prophecy twists seen in fiction ? If yes who could she betray and how ?

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This is a good one and you are asking all the questions that may or may not have an answer.  So I just don't know.  But I have tried looking at the triplets this way:

- a fire for life, a mount to bed, a treason for blood

- a fire for death, a mount to dread, a treason for gold

- a fire to love, a mount to love, a treason for love

We could also consider the other triplet from the Undying:

Bride of fire - three fires you must light

Mother of dragons - three mounts you must ride

Slayer of lies - three treasons you will know.

 

 

 

Edited by LynnS
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Since the prophecy is in the future, I think it is possible that earlier events (like MMD) do not count. Still the "mount to bed" phrase sounds very much like the silver horse Dany received as a wedding gift from Drogo, so perhaps the future tense means simply that altogether there will be three.

14 minutes ago, LynnS said:

This is a good one and you are asking all the questions that may or may not have an answer.  So I just don't know.  But I have tried looking at the triplets this way:

- a fire for life, a mount to bed, a treason for blood

- a fire for death, a mount to dread, a treason for gold

- a fire to love, a mount to love, a treason for love

 

Brilliant thinking outside the box!

The first series does seem to be about Drogo - falling in love with Drogo for survival / or to eventually conceive a baby - the silver horse - then maybe the treason is still MMD (betrayal in the sense that Dany trusted her). It would be a singular achievement though for a character to immediately interpret (at least part of) a prophecy correctly.

The second series can be about the dragons - the funeral pyre - Dany becoming a dragonrider - and in this case the treason for gold should also have something to do with the dragons. Daario comes to mind most easily as the betrayer. 

1 hour ago, Terrorthatflapsinthenight9 said:

As an additional thought and question, could it be that Daenerys could be the one who'll actually do these three betrayals, or at least one of them in one of the countless prophecy twists seen in fiction ? If yes who could she betray and how ?

I think it is possible that Dany may do one of these betrayals - the last one most probably. Who could she betray for love? Hm... Her dragons?

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32 minutes ago, Julia H. said:

Since the prophecy is in the future, I think it is possible that earlier events (like MMD) do not count. Still the "mount to bed" phrase sounds very much like the silver horse Dany received as a wedding gift from Drogo, so perhaps the future tense means simply that altogether there will be three.

The mount to ride certainly sounds like her Silver.  This is when she starts to lose her fear and feel free.  I wonder if the fire for life is when she becomes the bride of fire.  She is in pain and despairing because of Drogo's sexual attentions and doesn't want to continue living:

Quote

A Game of Thrones - Daenerys III

Day followed day, and night followed night, until Dany knew she could not endure a moment longer. She would kill herself rather than go on, she decided one night …

Yet when she slept that night, she dreamt the dragon dream again. Viserys was not in it this time. There was only her and the dragon. Its scales were black as night, wet and slick with blood. Her blood, Dany sensed. Its eyes were pools of molten magma, and when it opened its mouth, the flame came roaring out in a hot jet. She could hear it singing to her. She opened her arms to the fire, embraced it, let it swallow her whole, let it cleanse her and temper her and scour her clean. She could feel her flesh sear and blacken and slough away, could feel her blood boil and turn to steam, and yet there was no pain. She felt strong and new and fierce.

And the next day, strangely, she did not seem to hurt quite so much. It was as if the gods had heard her and taken pity. Even her handmaids noticed the change. "Khaleesi," Jhiqui said, "what is wrong? Are you sick?"

 

But I don't know what the treason for blood would be unless you consider Dany forsaking her brother as a 'blood' treason or Drogo (the crime of murdering someone to whom the murderer owed allegiance, such as a master or husband).

The second triplet seems to be the funeral pyre, Drogon the mount to dread but again I don't know what the treason for gold would be unless it's about Jorah Mormont.

The last three must also be about her dragons sometime in the future.   

That's my best guess. :cheers:  

Edited by LynnS
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I always considered Quaithe's prophecies to be designed to cripple Daenerys with fear and suspicion. She throws out these vaguely worded warnings, with enough nuggets of truth to get Dany's attention, but no clear meaning to keep her guessing. So the net result is to get her looking upon everyone around her with suspicion. Even potential allies. 

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14 minutes ago, LynnS said:

The last three must also be about her dragons sometime in the future.   

That's my best guess. :cheers:  

Ah, or maybe the first series is about Drogo, the second series is about the dragons, and the third series is about dragons in a different sense ('family').

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4 minutes ago, Lord Lannister said:

I always considered Quaithe's prophecies to be designed to cripple Daenerys with fear and suspicion. She throws out these vaguely worded warnings, with enough nuggets of truth to get Dany's attention, but no clear meaning to keep her guessing. So the net result is to get her looking upon everyone around her with suspicion. Even potential allies. 

This is the Undying speaking to Dany in the House of Undying.  Quaithe tells her to remember the Undying when she warns her about all those journeying to meet up with.  In other words, don't trust any of them.

 

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1 minute ago, Julia H. said:

Ah, or maybe the first series is about Drogo, the second series is about the dragons, and the third series is about dragons in a different sense ('family').

That would probably work too.  But I really don't have the foggiest idea.  

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3 hours ago, Terrorthatflapsinthenight9 said:

During Daenerys Targaryen's storyline in A Clash of Kings, she was confronted by the mysterious masked woman known under the name of Quaithe that she will know treason three times and each for a different reason: one for blood, one for gold and one for love.

I think the prophecies as written should be considered three-pronged (each head has a tale to tell and prophecy to live) and interconnected. 

One Treason for Blood: 

Dany becomes Mother of Dragons. 

Her False Dragon Foil, Tyrion, who dreams of burning his family with dragons, often sells his blood up the river in exchange for vengeance, though he's meant to be (or desired to be) Hand of the King, their first line of defense. 

One Treason for Gold:

fAegon becomes Aegon VI, a puppet to the Golden Company and the Blackfyre Restoration's efforts. 

His Dragon Foil, Cersei, also commits Treason for Gold: conceiving only bastard children, seating them upon the Iron Throne, and getting them all killed (golden shrouds). 

One Treason for Love: 

R+l=J. 

His False Dragon Foil, Jaime, also commits Treason for Love--"the things I do for love"--repeatedly, just like his siblings in their prongs of the prophecy, breaking any oath he must in order to do so. 

 

Quote
"Three?" She did not understand.
. . . three heads has the dragon . . . the ghost chorus yammered inside her skull with never a lip moving, never a breath stirring the still blue air. . . . mother of dragons . . . child of storm . . . The whispers became a swirling song. . . . three fires must you light . . . one for life and one for death and one to love . . . Her own heart was beating in unison to the one that floated before her, blue and corrupt . . . three mounts must you ride . . . one to bed and one to dread and one to love . . . The voices were growing louder, she realized, and it seemed her heart was slowing, and even her breath. . . . three treasons will you know . . . once for blood and once for gold and once for love . . .
"I don't . . ." Her voice was no more than a whisper, almost as faint as theirs. What was happening to her? "I don't understand," she said, more loudly. Why was it so hard to talk here? "Help me. Show me."
 
A Clash of Kings, Dany IV

This passage is too often taken outside the context of the chapter (revealing that prophecy in its entirety even before she gets to this chamber! The chapter must be analyzed as a whole. All prophetic parts should be put together, like a puzzle. 

So this one: the old, bright (silver), true (Targ) dragon versus the young, dark (gold), false (Lannister) dragon with three heads. 

The Dragon god has three heads. Earth (Stone Dragon) plus her three quarrelsome brothers: Sun (Bastard Tyrant Hand of the Queen--AAR archetype), Big Moon (Wizarding Quagmire Advisor; Varys Archetype), Small Moon (Lying Whore, Father-of-Dragons; Littlefinger Archetype)

Dany is, herself, playing the Mother of Dragons in this prophecy sequence. ("...mother of dragons... child of storm...")

Something has gone wrong with the gods--the seasons and their crowning symbols--"Her own heart was beating in unison to the one that floated before her, blue and corrupt...." This is telling us "As Above, So Below" in terms of the prophecy. The planetary bodies suffer the same corruption as the ancient god. Dany will suffer in that corrupt too, like all other parties, unless she finds a way to break free of it (no longer a puppet dancing on a string). 

So, what does the three-headed dragon do?

Dany: =[Destroyer Aspect of Three-Headed Deity, Trios]

Light a fire for life, ride a mount to bed, know a treason for blood. 

She brings fire dragons back into the world. She lights a fire for life (the magical ritual she must perform to hatch the dragon eggs). She rides a mount to bed (she marries Khal Drogo and they conceive a child together, what carries her to the bloody bed and the tent of terror). She commits a treason for blood (she sacrifices that child in exchange for a "mount"--Drogo, whose stallion she commanded slain after unhorsing him forcibly in the Dothraki Sea). 

fAegon: [Preserver Aspect of Three-Headed Deity, Trios]

Light a fire for death, ride a mount to dread, know a treason for gold. 

He becomes King of Westeros, Aegon VI, the father of dragons (i.e., he's the only one who sires a dynasty to progress). 

He lights a fire for death when he takes the place (unwitting) of Aegon VI, Rhaegar's son, and rides to war in Westeros to restore the Targaryen Dynasty (Fire and Blood). He rides a mount to dread when he bonds with Rhaegal and rides him into battle and to his death at the God's Eye, brother slaying brother (Jon Snow kills fAegon when he rides south with Stannis's host). Inside that dread mount, he might even meet the soul of his dead cousin, Aegon VI, and realize the horror that was done to him by his advisors and supporters. Which brings us to a treason for gold--the Blackfyres succeed to supplant the House of Targaryen at last, because Jon Snow will surely need an heir of the blood. 

 

Jon Snow: [Creator Aspect of Three-Headed Deity, Trios]

He lights a fire to love when he dies and becomes the Three-Eyed Crow, to learn of his ancestry in the Winterfell crypts, RLJ, and is reborn Aemon Targaryen. He rides a mount to love, when he skinchanges into his other lives (Ghost, Viserion) and rides down the kingsroad at last, to advance the cause of the Night's Watch against the Others. He knows a treason for love in RLJ when Ned Stark, who BROKE Lyanna's promise (by keeping the letter of the law and breaking its spirit--which is precisely how we see "thrice-damned fool" Ned handle three separate promises in A Game of Thrones) for love of Robert Baratheon, and ultimately, sent her Targaryen King to the Wall, so he could prove no threat to the Baratheon Dynasty in the time of its upheaval. Note, this is the only promise Ned actually broke "for love" (a curious turn of phrase "and once for love" instead of "and one for love"); the others, he broke in service of his own aims.

 

Do any of the False Dragons do similar things?

Tyrion--a fire for life, a mount to bed, a treason for blood

Tyrion burns the Blackwater to save King's Landing. He betrays and rapes his own wife Tysha and murders his own sire because of it. He's twice accused of committing treason and murdering important rulers, Jon Arryn, Hand of the King, and Joffrey Baratheon, King of Westeros, and once convicted of them. Because of his conviction, her turns upon House Lannister, keen to bring them vengeance and pay his debts, hoping to use Dany as a crutch and fAegon as fodder.

Cersei--a fire for death, a mount to dread, a treason for gold

Cersei murders Robert and starts the ball rolling on Ned (via Joffrey) and the War of the Five Kings, and all that follows. As Robert's queen, she suffered many rapes and sexual assaults, including her bride night encounter where Robert called out Lyanna's name inside her, and so refused to bear him legitimate heirs, killing the only child in womb she knew to be his. She usurps the IRON THRONE for HOUSE LANNISTER and her children (with three golden crowns and three golden shrouds). 

Jaime--a fire to love, a mount to love, a treason for love

Jaime slays Rossart, King Aerys II's pyromancer, to prevent him burning King's Landing, but then, when it is no longer necessary (city saved from fire, city lost to rebels), he slays Aerys II, too, becoming Kingslayer, to avenge himself when Aerys II demanded Tywin's head if he were loyal. He tells no one about the lurking threat of wildfire, some of which is later used by Tyrion to burn Stannis's ships at the Blackwater. He has an incestuous affair with his sister, siring her bastard children, aiding her to usurp the Baratheon kingship, and triggering the War of Five Kings when they're 1. caught, and 2. by attacking Ned in the streets of King's Landing and slaughtering his men, to avenge Tyrion's kidnapping to the Eyrie by Cat. He throws Bran (as a guest of his house!) out the Broken Tower window because the child accidentally caught him having his repulsive incestuous affair with his sister, the queen, and stated as he did, "the things I do for love." 

 

If you want to know more about the deaths of the promised prince and the false dragon foil, you should turn to Maggy the Frog and similar sources, which is where those details are revealed (some can be spied in the HotU, like the naked woman sprawled on the floor with the servitor dwarves raping her, which is the culmination of Cersei's Tyrion dreams!). 

Other important sources of prophecy: Jon Snow's crypt dreams; Theon's feast of the dead dream; Jaime's weirwood stump dream where his mother comes to him as a "banshee" figure to prepare him for death are all connected to Jon Snow's arc, with bits of Patchface thrown in "the crows are white as snow" and they have red eye; "you fall up!" and "starfish soup" etc. 

Cersei's dreams of mice and Iron Throne, of Maggy the Frog, and her witch hunt for Tyrion's head form a cohesive whole, and all her thoughts about Maergery and the Maidenvault pertain to her own fate, "Princess in the tower". Also, Arianne. 

Tyrion's dreams of dragons, burning his family alive (like Rickard Stark, he dies by a Mad Targ Ruler intent to have "the greatest funeral pyre of them all.") Moqorro tells Tyrion of his giant shadow and dancing in midst of the dragons. (He's one of them). His chapter in Tyrion, Dance, what I've written a bit about here "(ALL ABOUT OLIVES section): 

 

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1 hour ago, TheSeason said:

He lights a fire to love when he dies and becomes the Three-Eyed Crow

This caught my eye.  Do you think that Jon is the 3EC of Bran's dreams?  I wondered about it when Patchface sees Jon for the first time:  

Quote

A Dance with Dragons - Jon XI

Jon had expected that. The direwolf made Queen Selyse anxious, almost as much as Wun Weg Wun Dar Wun. "Ghost, stay."

They found Her Grace sewing by the fire, whilst her fool danced about to music only he could hear, the cowbells on his antlers clanging. "The crow, the crow," Patchface cried when he saw Jon. "Under the sea the crows are white as snow, I know, I know, oh, oh, oh." Princess Shireen was curled up in a window seat, her hood drawn up to hide the worst of the greyscale that had disfigured her face.

 

Bran refers to the crow, rather than the 3EC.  All crows are liars.

Quote

A Game of Thrones - Bran IV

"It was just a lie," he said bitterly, remembering the crow from his dream. "I can't fly. I can't even run."

"Crows are all liars," Old Nan agreed, from the chair where she sat doing her needlework. "I know a story about a crow."

"I don't want any more stories," Bran snapped, his voice petulant. He had liked Old Nan and her stories once. Before. But it was different now. They left her with him all day now, to watch over him and clean him and keep him from being lonely, but she just made it worse. "I hate your stupid stories."

Mormont also says that crows are liars:

Quote

A Clash of Kings - Jon I

"I've always known that Robb would be Lord of Winterfell."

Mormont gave a whistle, and the bird flew to him again and settled on his arm. "A lord's one thing, a king's another." He offered the raven a handful of corn from his pocket. "They will garb your brother Robb in silks, satins, and velvets of a hundred different colors, while you live and die in black ringmail. He will wed some beautiful princess and father sons on her. You'll have no wife, nor will you ever hold a child of your own blood in your arms. Robb will rule, you will serve. Men will call you a crow. Him they'll call Your Grace. Singers will praise every little thing he does, while your greatest deeds all go unsung. Tell me that none of this troubles you, Jon . . . and I'll name you a liar, and know I have the truth of it."

 

 

Edited by LynnS
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Just now, LynnS said:

This caught my eye.  Do you think that Jon is the 3EC of Bran's dreams?  I wondered about it when Patchface sees Jon for the first time:  

Bran refers to the crow, rather than the 3EC.  All crows are liars.

Mormont also says that crows are liars:

 

Yep! That's precisely what I believe. Jon Snow is the Three-Eyed Crow of Bran's encounters; it's a white crow with red eyes (its coloration is never yet described in the books but inferred via Ghost, Patchface, and the Maesters' white raven flocks). When you reread Bran's falling sequence with it in mind that Jon Snow is the 3EC trying to save his baby brother, his storyline there--and leading unto the sojourn beyond the Wall, with all his indulgence in abomination--becomes much more poignant, as well as Cat's vicious remark "It should've been you." Give it another read, if you haven't already. It's an interesting chapter, when you know they're brothers and that this is all happening "sorta kinda" after Jon's assassination in at the Wall. Jon is reaching back through time (like a weirwood) to work a miracle for his brother, after his own death, leading to his resurrection. It's like Jesus Christ visiting the Underworld. 

(I think what went wrong in part in the show is that Bran's story arc is not one that transfers well to film, so they gave him half of Jon's story arc, thinking, no problem. Then, later, realized Jon has F-All to do, so... let's steal Stannis's storyline to make up for it! They do this repeatedly--as well as refusing to kill off or enforce consequence upon characters or actors they favor--and the result is pure nonsense.) 

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13 minutes ago, TheSeason said:

Yep! That's precisely what I believe. Jon Snow is the Three-Eyed Crow of Bran's encounters; it's a white crow with red eyes (its coloration is never yet described in the books but inferred via Ghost, Patchface, and the Maesters' white raven flocks). When you reread Bran's falling sequence with it in mind that Jon Snow is the 3EC trying to save his baby brother, his storyline there--and leading unto the sojourn beyond the Wall, with all his indulgence in abomination--becomes much more poignant, as well as Cat's vicious remark "It should've been you." Give it another read, if you haven't already. It's an interesting chapter, when you know they're brothers and that this is all happening "sorta kinda" after Jon's assassination in at the Wall. Jon is reaching back through time (like a weirwood) to work a miracle for his brother, after his own death, leading to his resurrection. It's like Jesus Christ visiting the Underworld. 

Well, I've never come across anyone who has ever considered this before besides myself.  Color me surprised.  I have thought that Jon might become connected to the wiernet especially after he encounters tree-Bran at the Skirling Pass and Bran touches Jon/Ghost's 3rd eye.  There are other subtle coincidences in the text.  The crow pecking at Bran's 3rd eye and pulling out bits of bone and brain.  Jon watching Mormont's raven doing something similar with an egg.  Jon's anxiety and concern for Bran while he is in a coma, etc.  Well, that makes two of us now!  :D

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39 minutes ago, TheSeason said:

it's a white crow with red eyes (its coloration is never yet described in the books but inferred via Ghost, Patchface, and the Maesters' white raven flocks).

We do differ in one aspect.  If Jon is a product of R+L, then I think he will have an affinity to ice rather than fire.  He would become the ice dragon.  As above, so below:

Quote

A Clash of Kings - Bran V

"Osha," Bran asked as they crossed the yard. "Do you know the way north? To the Wall and . . . and even past?"

"The way's easy. Look for the Ice Dragon, and chase the blue star in the rider's eye." She backed through a door and started up the winding steps.

"And there are still giants there, and . . . the rest . . . the Others, and the children of the forest too?"

 

 

Edited by LynnS
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16 hours ago, Terrorthatflapsinthenight9 said:

During Daenerys Targaryen's storyline in A Clash of Kings, she was confronted by the mysterious masked woman known under the name of Quaithe that she will know treason three times and each for a different reason: one for blood, one for gold and one for love.

Daenerys has already interpretated that the first treason, the one for blood was Mirri Maz Duur's betrayal when Mirri used her magic to heal Khal Drogo but left him in a vegetative state and gave a particulary terrifying end to Rhaego inside Daenerys' womb to prevent the prophecy of the Stallion riding the World to ever come true.

Of course this is Daenerys' own interpretation and it's totally possible that it's not true and that the betrayal for blood has yet to happen, after all it could be argued that Mirri never really betrayed Daenerys since she was never in Daenerys' side and never swore any allegiance to her in the first place .

If not Mirri's actions then what do you think could be the betrayal for blood ? What do you think will be the other two betrayals that Quaithe was alluding to, the one for gold and the one for love ? Who do you think could be the ones doing these treasons, and for which motives and through which means ?

As an additional thought and question, could it be that Daenerys could be the one who'll actually do these three betrayals, or at least one of them in one of the countless prophecy twists seen in fiction ? If yes who could she betray and how ?

It will happen in sets and one set has already happened, one is, as of ADWD, happening right now, and one set will happen later Is my take. I would also tie them to time and/or places: up until she reaches Qarth/In Dothraki sea, During her early conquests until she goes to Westeros/Slaver’s bay and After she has left Slaver’s bay/ in Westeros.

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18 hours ago, LynnS said:

Well, I've never come across anyone who has ever considered this before besides myself.  Color me surprised.  I have thought that Jon might become connected to the wiernet especially after he encounters tree-Bran at the Skirling Pass and Bran touches Jon/Ghost's 3rd eye.  There are other subtle coincidences in the text.  The crow pecking at Bran's 3rd eye and pulling out bits of bone and brain.  Jon watching Mormont's raven doing something similar with an egg.  Jon's anxiety and concern for Bran while he is in a coma, etc.  Well, that makes two of us now!  :D

The more the merrier! We should start a correspondence club--white ravens only!

 

18 hours ago, LynnS said:

We do differ in one aspect.  If Jon is a product of R+L, then I think he will have an affinity to ice rather than fire.  He would become the ice dragon.  As above, so below:

I don't think there is an "ice" or "fire" affinity as such, as you put it, but that ice and fire are two halves of the whole (the whole (broken) heart of winter, the moon god, the god of black and white, the weirwood and the shade of the evening, the black blood (pool) nourishes them both and is either corrupt and freezing cold or corrupt and seething hot). She scourges with both fire (Dany's fire dragons in Essos) and ice (Winter, the Ice Dragon, Cometh in Westeros). The Song of Ice and Fire is the song of apocalypse by both ends, (the Robert Frost poem: but if the world should perish twice.) The apocalypse is both elements out of control

To restore them, the puppet must shake off its mother's strings. 

No more fire dragon for you. 

No more ice dragon for you, either. 

I serve myself. I serve my people. I serve my kingdom. 

I bring against you the stone dragon.

And restore the rightful balance of the seasons, to make them incorruptible again. 

Being the product of R+L makes J a stone dragon, birthed by an ice dragon, sired by a fire dragon. He has the green balance within him, restored to him. 

Dany's "affinity" is just the greening effect of the Dothraki Sea drying because her fire is burning too hot. She consumes the green power within her. Consuming (via fire), she becomes the Destroyer Head of Trios. 1st Forging/ 1st Mounting. The Red Comet (Nissa Nissa, where her soul went after the AAR incident instead of into the dragon eggs rained upon earth) heralds the fire of the song.

fAegon does the same thing, but to a lesser extent. His temper flies too high and hot, ruining best-laid plans of mice and men, but still, he manages to plant something enduring although consuming himself in the process. Thus, he becomes the Preserver Head of Trios. 2nd Forging/2nd Mounting. The Shooting Stars (the empty, soulless dragon eggs, rained down as Nissa Nissa's corpse after her soul went into the sword and then was used to slay her own son!) herald his coming, still bringing rains of fire and tears of blood, beseeching vengeance. 

Jon Snow manages--with help of R+L, the crypts, Cat and Jaime--to find the proper balance again, to sing the song of ice and fire, the rendition that permits the corn to flourish and feed the men, that men need not feed the crows. (Dany makes popcorn and fAegon spreads the seeds, supposing, lol). 3rd Forging/3rd Mounting. The stone dragon reawakens, but will not suffer himself to be the puppet of a mother (ice dragon or fire dragon) in search of vengeance. He chooses instead the pearl without price. The Horn of Joramun (the Mother's Cry, giving birth to a living child, ToJ--"when your womb quickens and you bear a living child again" what MMD says to Dany pertains to Jon +Jaime , just like "seas go dry" pertains to Dany and Tyrion, and "mountains blow in the wind" pertains to fAegon + Cersei) will herald Jon Snow's coming, the waking of the stone dragon, waking the giant of the earth (the green giant). The Creator Head of Trios. 

Edited by TheSeason
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21 hours ago, TheSeason said:

I think the prophecies as written should be considered three-pronged (each head has a tale to tell and prophecy to live) and interconnected. 

One Treason for Blood: 

Dany becomes Mother of Dragons. 

Her False Dragon Foil, Tyrion, who dreams of burning his family with dragons, often sells his blood up the river in exchange for vengeance, though he's meant to be (or desired to be) Hand of the King, their first line of defense. 

One Treason for Gold:

fAegon becomes Aegon VI, a puppet to the Golden Company and the Blackfyre Restoration's efforts. 

His Dragon Foil, Cersei, also commits Treason for Gold: conceiving only bastard children, seating them upon the Iron Throne, and getting them all killed (golden shrouds). 

One Treason for Love: 

R+l=J. 

His False Dragon Foil, Jaime, also commits Treason for Love--"the things I do for love"--repeatedly, just like his siblings in their prongs of the prophecy, breaking any oath he must in order to do so. 

 

This passage is too often taken outside the context of the chapter (revealing that prophecy in its entirety even before she gets to this chamber! The chapter must be analyzed as a whole. All prophetic parts should be put together, like a puzzle. 

So this one: the old, bright (silver), true (Targ) dragon versus the young, dark (gold), false (Lannister) dragon with three heads. 

The Dragon god has three heads. Earth (Stone Dragon) plus her three quarrelsome brothers: Sun (Bastard Tyrant Hand of the Queen--AAR archetype), Big Moon (Wizarding Quagmire Advisor; Varys Archetype), Small Moon (Lying Whore, Father-of-Dragons; Littlefinger Archetype)

Dany is, herself, playing the Mother of Dragons in this prophecy sequence. ("...mother of dragons... child of storm...")

Something has gone wrong with the gods--the seasons and their crowning symbols--"Her own heart was beating in unison to the one that floated before her, blue and corrupt...." This is telling us "As Above, So Below" in terms of the prophecy. The planetary bodies suffer the same corruption as the ancient god. Dany will suffer in that corrupt too, like all other parties, unless she finds a way to break free of it (no longer a puppet dancing on a string). 

So, what does the three-headed dragon do?

Dany: =[Destroyer Aspect of Three-Headed Deity, Trios]

Light a fire for life, ride a mount to bed, know a treason for blood. 

She brings fire dragons back into the world. She lights a fire for life (the magical ritual she must perform to hatch the dragon eggs). She rides a mount to bed (she marries Khal Drogo and they conceive a child together, what carries her to the bloody bed and the tent of terror). She commits a treason for blood (she sacrifices that child in exchange for a "mount"--Drogo, whose stallion she commanded slain after unhorsing him forcibly in the Dothraki Sea). 

fAegon: [Preserver Aspect of Three-Headed Deity, Trios]

Light a fire for death, ride a mount to dread, know a treason for gold. 

He becomes King of Westeros, Aegon VI, the father of dragons (i.e., he's the only one who sires a dynasty to progress). 

He lights a fire for death when he takes the place (unwitting) of Aegon VI, Rhaegar's son, and rides to war in Westeros to restore the Targaryen Dynasty (Fire and Blood). He rides a mount to dread when he bonds with Rhaegal and rides him into battle and to his death at the God's Eye, brother slaying brother (Jon Snow kills fAegon when he rides south with Stannis's host). Inside that dread mount, he might even meet the soul of his dead cousin, Aegon VI, and realize the horror that was done to him by his advisors and supporters. Which brings us to a treason for gold--the Blackfyres succeed to supplant the House of Targaryen at last, because Jon Snow will surely need an heir of the blood. 

 

Jon Snow: [Creator Aspect of Three-Headed Deity, Trios]

He lights a fire to love when he dies and becomes the Three-Eyed Crow, to learn of his ancestry in the Winterfell crypts, RLJ, and is reborn Aemon Targaryen. He rides a mount to love, when he skinchanges into his other lives (Ghost, Viserion) and rides down the kingsroad at last, to advance the cause of the Night's Watch against the Others. He knows a treason for love in RLJ when Ned Stark, who BROKE Lyanna's promise (by keeping the letter of the law and breaking its spirit--which is precisely how we see "thrice-damned fool" Ned handle three separate promises in A Game of Thrones) for love of Robert Baratheon, and ultimately, sent her Targaryen King to the Wall, so he could prove no threat to the Baratheon Dynasty in the time of its upheaval. Note, this is the only promise Ned actually broke "for love" (a curious turn of phrase "and once for love" instead of "and one for love"); the others, he broke in service of his own aims.

 

Do any of the False Dragons do similar things?

Tyrion--a fire for life, a mount to bed, a treason for blood

Tyrion burns the Blackwater to save King's Landing. He betrays and rapes his own wife Tysha and murders his own sire because of it. He's twice accused of committing treason and murdering important rulers, Jon Arryn, Hand of the King, and Joffrey Baratheon, King of Westeros, and once convicted of them. Because of his conviction, her turns upon House Lannister, keen to bring them vengeance and pay his debts, hoping to use Dany as a crutch and fAegon as fodder.

Cersei--a fire for death, a mount to dread, a treason for gold

Cersei murders Robert and starts the ball rolling on Ned (via Joffrey) and the War of the Five Kings, and all that follows. As Robert's queen, she suffered many rapes and sexual assaults, including her bride night encounter where Robert called out Lyanna's name inside her, and so refused to bear him legitimate heirs, killing the only child in womb she knew to be his. She usurps the IRON THRONE for HOUSE LANNISTER and her children (with three golden crowns and three golden shrouds). 

Jaime--a fire to love, a mount to love, a treason for love

Jaime slays Rossart, King Aerys II's pyromancer, to prevent him burning King's Landing, but then, when it is no longer necessary (city saved from fire, city lost to rebels), he slays Aerys II, too, becoming Kingslayer, to avenge himself when Aerys II demanded Tywin's head if he were loyal. He tells no one about the lurking threat of wildfire, some of which is later used by Tyrion to burn Stannis's ships at the Blackwater. He has an incestuous affair with his sister, siring her bastard children, aiding her to usurp the Baratheon kingship, and triggering the War of Five Kings when they're 1. caught, and 2. by attacking Ned in the streets of King's Landing and slaughtering his men, to avenge Tyrion's kidnapping to the Eyrie by Cat. He throws Bran (as a guest of his house!) out the Broken Tower window because the child accidentally caught him having his repulsive incestuous affair with his sister, the queen, and stated as he did, "the things I do for love." 

 

If you want to know more about the deaths of the promised prince and the false dragon foil, you should turn to Maggy the Frog and similar sources, which is where those details are revealed (some can be spied in the HotU, like the naked woman sprawled on the floor with the servitor dwarves raping her, which is the culmination of Cersei's Tyrion dreams!). 

Other important sources of prophecy: Jon Snow's crypt dreams; Theon's feast of the dead dream; Jaime's weirwood stump dream where his mother comes to him as a "banshee" figure to prepare him for death are all connected to Jon Snow's arc, with bits of Patchface thrown in "the crows are white as snow" and they have red eye; "you fall up!" and "starfish soup" etc. 

Cersei's dreams of mice and Iron Throne, of Maggy the Frog, and her witch hunt for Tyrion's head form a cohesive whole, and all her thoughts about Maergery and the Maidenvault pertain to her own fate, "Princess in the tower". Also, Arianne. 

Tyrion's dreams of dragons, burning his family alive (like Rickard Stark, he dies by a Mad Targ Ruler intent to have "the greatest funeral pyre of them all.") Moqorro tells Tyrion of his giant shadow and dancing in midst of the dragons. (He's one of them). His chapter in Tyrion, Dance, what I've written a bit about here "(ALL ABOUT OLIVES section): 

 

Thanks for the link to your earlier post, I haven't seen it before. Very interesting analysis.

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"You are kind to ask, my lord, but my tale is long and sad, and we have treasons to discuss."
A Clash of Kings - Tyrion II

I think the details and the wording of things like this are important... so to start, when does Quaithe ever mention three treasons?

"Daenerys. Remember the Undying. Remember who you are."
"The blood of the dragon." But my dragons are roaring in the darkness. "I remember the Undying. Child of three, they called me. Three mounts they promised me, three fires, and three treasons. One for blood and one for gold and one for …"

A Dance with Dragons - Daenerys II

 

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2 hours ago, TheSeason said:

The more the merrier! We should start a correspondence club--white ravens only!

:cheers:

2 hours ago, TheSeason said:

I don't think there is an "ice" or "fire" affinity as such, as you put it, but that ice and fire are two halves of the whole

I agree.  I would characterize it as two sides of the same coin, polar opposites on the same axis or spectrum.  As Mel says there is no shadow without light.  One cannot exist without the other.  The problem is that they exist at the moment in opposition to each other.

Coming back to the 3EC for a second;  if this is Jon, what is he showing Bran in the heart of winter?  Gseers can look into hearts and souls and see the truth.  When Bran looks into the third eye of the 3EC he sees terrible knowledge.   Is the heart of winter something that Jon will become.  The reason why Bran must live?  To save Jon from his destiny?

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