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International Events IX: I feel like a mushroom


Which Tyler

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Considering how overwhelming it must have been to live under a state-sponsored fatwa, I can understand why Salman lived the way he did for 13 years or so after the announcement. And considering the hardships against his family, I sympathize with him. What surprises me, though, is how he moved on and tried to live normally (as normally as a decamillionaire could live..).

I hope he survives this, and writes a sequel.

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15 hours ago, DMC said:

Rushdie has been a regular guest on Maher's shows for decades.  Frankly he comes across as an asshole, not that that matters.

To put it nicely. Is that the reason you are so strongly affected by this?

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5 hours ago, DireWolfSpirit said:

I think it's been a mistake for Rushdie to not reciprocate and offer a bounty on a fundy Iranian leader.

His resources are likely to outlast him, may as well put them to use making life less fun for people actively trying to end you.

DireWolfSpirit -- hahaha, I like where you're going with this. An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth -- seemingly escalatory, is actually a humane, civilized means of limiting bloodshed. In other words; you take an eye, and I take an eye in retaliation (but no more that that). In a civilized society.

Unfortunately, fundemantalist Iran is not civilized. Deploying his millions would be a mistake, as Iran would go beyond the biblical policy of moderation and would probably seek out the murder of Salman's (remaining) family. Plus, it'd be a horrible way to live out your life, guilty of providing a bounty for murder. He lived his life well, from what I read. And his death would still indicate a life well lived given the density and length of his 75 years. If he really wants revenge, he needs to write a book sequel.

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2 hours ago, kiko said:

To put it nicely. Is that the reason you are so strongly affected by this?

Yeah I haven't been able to eat or sleep since it happened.

While Iran/Khomeini obviously are responsible for the fatwa and corresponding (still outstanding) bounty, I'm uncomfortable with the singular focus on Iran that I've seen in the coverage.  This is a problem with radical Islam everywhere.  And not in a figurative or broad sense, literally the first assassination attempt on Rushdie after the fatwa was proclaimed was by a member of a Lebanese group; there was a Pakistani film that depicted Rushdie being killed at the end; he was on Al-Awlaki/Al-Qaeda's hit list.

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Pakistan's 75th Independence day today

Neighbour India has it in a few hours tomorrow

Interesting that the Rushdie incident occurred so close to the Platinum jubilee of freedom of two of the three main countries in which his Booker of Bookers, Midnight's Children was set in. Also the exact date of birth of the thousand odd mutant kids born on the stroke of midnight, 15th Aug 1947.

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3 hours ago, Clueless Northman said:

If you read the book, odds are that you'll come to the conclusion that you can't really find any good way of making a sequel to the Satanic Verses.

Clueless Northman -- I wouldn't be surprised, hahaha! But, as Zorral (insightfully) claimed, the Ayatollahs probably hadn't read the book. Let's call it a ... prequel?

Apparently, Salman is off the respirator and speaking, and is on the road to recovery.

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3 hours ago, The Anti-Targ said:

Do you think it would have made a difference if they had?

Of course not, like the fAryans were gonna kill Jews regardless of whether they'd read Darwin, one of their stupid pseudoscientific claims for ethnic 'cleansing'.

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Okay...I have been coming across little video clips and short articles claiming that mainland China is on the brink of a major economic collapse as a result of what amounts to a bursting real estate bubble. Trying to decide if this hype or if there is something to it, and trying to get a handle of some sort on the implications either way.

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13 hours ago, The Anti-Targ said:

I dunno much about the book. Do you think it would have made a difference if they had?

I wouldn't be surprised if Khomeini actually had some insights into it - he's first portrayed as some kind of religious leader who wants freedom from the local dictator and pushes his people to revolt, but ends up turning into some kind of tyrant which devours its own people. His fast and very strong reaction makes much more sense once you've read the book - all the "Rushdie shouldn't have insulted Islam" bullshit is obviously total nonsense when you've read the book, it's not a deliberately insulting Danish or "Charlie hebdo" cartoon, it's mildly sympathetic towards Muhammed, just not enough for some apparently.

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1 hour ago, ThinkerX said:

Okay...I have been coming across little video clips and short articles claiming that mainland China is on the brink of a major economic collapse as a result of what amounts to a bursting real estate bubble. Trying to decide if this hype or if there is something to it, and trying to get a handle of some sort on the implications either way.

The implications of a China economic collapse on the world would be severe, we're all economically tied in to China in one way or another. It will be an interesting test case for how a more tightly managed economy can work through a problem in the non-productive sector of the economy (i.e. a sector that does not directly affect manufacturing, agriculture or services).

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6 hours ago, ThinkerX said:

Okay...I have been coming across little video clips and short articles claiming that mainland China is on the brink of a major economic collapse as a result of what amounts to a bursting real estate bubble. Trying to decide if this hype or if there is something to it, and trying to get a handle of some sort on the implications either way.

ThinkerX -- this has been going on for months, hahaha. It's not hype!!! Look up Evergrande, et al.; the PRC's citizens stopped making mortgage payments on residences developers failed to start or complete; and, associated bank runs / debt payment failures. Compare what's going on in the PRC now with the most recent US subprime mortgage crisis, which was kinda resolved (thanks to people like me who who jumped in immediately, and corporations that jumped in eventually; and selflessly acquired abandoned homes while securing ludicrous profits). If I were a PRC citizen, I'd be posturing to exploit the current and future economic volatility they'll experience this decade.

As @The Anti-Targ correctly mentioned, it will be a very (very) interesting test case to see how the PRC (and its political infrastructure / market system) handles the housing crisis. There's advantage, though, in their grandfatherly control over the population (e.g. capacity to lock down city-wide populations as an overreaction to COVID, willingness to slaughter 10,000 or more citizens when challenged, and clarified intent to expand geographically in response to Nancy's presence in Chaiwan). The state will most likely survive; though, (imo) looming over all is a developing sense of regional war in the short- to mid-term.

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2 hours ago, Wade1865 said:

ThinkerX -- this has been going on for months, hahaha. It's not hype!!! Look up Evergrande, et al.; the PRC's citizens stopped making mortgage payments on residences developers failed to start or complete; and, associated bank runs / debt payment failures. Compare what's going on in the PRC now with the most recent US subprime mortgage crisis, which was kinda resolved (thanks to people like me who who jumped in immediately, and corporations that jumped in eventually; and selflessly acquired abandoned homes while securing ludicrous profits). If I were a PRC citizen, I'd be posturing to exploit the current and future economic volatility they'll experience this decade.

As @The Anti-Targ correctly mentioned, it will be a very (very) interesting test case to see how the PRC (and its political infrastructure / market system) handles the housing crisis. There's advantage, though, in their grandfatherly control over the population (e.g. capacity to lock down city-wide populations as an overreaction to COVID, willingness to slaughter 10,000 or more citizens when challenged, and clarified intent to expand geographically in response to Nancy's presence in Chaiwan). The state will most likely survive; though, (imo) looming over all is a developing sense of regional war in the short- to mid-term.

The snippets I have seen and read all mentioned 'Evergrande.' However, they were all sensational in nature, which makes me suspicious of exaggeration on the part of those sources.  If given any credibility, this, combined with the likes of climate change and peak oil (yes, that is still an issue) would have an ugly effect on global civilization, not merely China. Yet, what I had to go on, to me, looked like hype. 

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