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UK Politics: Come See The Clowns, And Their Lapdogs Too


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35 minutes ago, DanteGabriel said:

We have an electric kettle, it can boil 16 oz of water in five minutes. Is that slow?

Apart from the slowness compared to higher voltage outputs, this video suggests you really need to get a new kettle, since the demo here is on 1 litre and the boiling time is faster.

But it also suggests the reason for so few kettles in the USA is not because of the time to boil, since kettles are still faster than stove tops even at 120V, the reason is more mundane. But you have to watch to find out the reason proposed in this video.

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11 minutes ago, A Horse Named Stranger said:

For comparission 1L (34 oz) should take around 3 minutes.

Check your kettle whether it's calcified. 

 

If in America, its probably the lower voltage

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25 minutes ago, Derfel Cadarn said:

 

Our paid sick days would really disillusion you (I’m public sector, get 6 months full pay, 6 minths halfoay). I had to take today off as daughter got sent home from nursery, boss didnt put it through as anything.

We can pay a very small monthly fee to protect full pay up to a year. Which sounds like a good idea but some people massively take the piss. 

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1 hour ago, Raja said:

I lived in a small college town in the midwest and we were fortunately able to use a kettle. Had no idea it was a power rating thing.

Yes, American mains power is 120V compared to 240V for Britain

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1 hour ago, Derfel Cadarn said:

If in America, its probably the lower voltage

We have the same 120V in Canada and we all have electric kettles. 5 min is too slow for a good kettle. The wattage of the kettle is the important factor. 1500w is standard as a kitchen outlet is rated for 15 amps.

Edited by maarsen
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1 hour ago, DanteGabriel said:

This almost as disillusioning as finding out how much vacation y'all get.

Have a look at house prices and square footage in any European city. That’ll make you feel better.

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2 hours ago, Werthead said:

Apparently true in general, but in the big cities they do now have a comparable voltage. There's been several mini-crazes of electric kettle sales booming because of some TikToker moving to Chicago or New York and gushing over them.

I have an electric teakettle which my sister gave me years ago. I don't use it much in the summer but in the winter when I do drink a lot of hot tea I use it almost every day. Also, I have never thought of it with the word "kettle" but just as my "water boiler." :) I think of a "kettle" as a large pot and you'd have to specifically say  "teakettle" before I'd know you were referring to the appliance you're talking about. I wonder if that's one of the more subtle differences between British and American English. 

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3 hours ago, Tywin et al. said:

Little known historical fact: We threw your tea into the Boston Harbor because it was trash, not over taxes. Great Americans came up with a better version of it and boy George threw a fit and chose violence. 

That is truly one of the funniest things you’ve ever written.

Traveling to the US has always meant bring your own tea with you because the tea is is even worse than the coffee. Although with specialty shops these days you might find a good coffee or good cuppa, if you’re lucky.

 

 

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5 hours ago, Derfel Cadarn said:

Apparently Americans generally don’t have kettles because their power rating is less than ours, and so it would take forever to boil.

Hence boing water on the hob or microwaving tea

Actually, if you don’t know any different the kettle works just fine! Every Canadian household has an electric tea kettle, well, almost every household. My friends insist on using the stove to boil water. It’s only Americans who don’t know what a tea kettle is.

Eta: just saw Dante’s post about 5 minutes! Holy crap, i’d throw that thing out.

Edited by Fragile Bird
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Does anyone know when the debates are going to take place? Others have said, and I agree, that this is Truss' race to lose.  

Rishi will play the "one true Brexiteer" card but Boris has always been the party's hero, and they will pay him out for wielding the knife, even though really it was more like pulling the plug. 

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5 hours ago, Derfel Cadarn said:

Apparently Americans generally don’t have kettles because their power rating is less than ours, and so it would take forever to boil.

Hence boing water on the hob or microwaving tea

In my case it is space -- I live with another person in a very tiny apartment.  It takes about 3 -4 minutes for water to boil in my stove kettle, just the amount of time I need to measure the (loose leaf, Chinese, for the most part, with Japanese when I'm feeling particularly flush) tea for the teapot.  

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2 hours ago, Fragile Bird said:

That is truly one of the funniest things you’ve ever written.

Traveling to the US has always meant bring your own tea with you because the tea is is even worse than the coffee. Although with specialty shops these days you might find a good coffee or good cuppa, if you’re lucky.

 

 

I’ve always wondered if I’d like tea and coffee if I was in a different country. Reminds me of the time I supervised an 18 year old intern from France and how much he decried the cheese and wine in our country. Even the good stuff was trash to him.

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6 hours ago, Derfel Cadarn said:

Apparently Americans generally don’t have kettles because their power rating is less than ours, and so it would take forever to boil.

Hence boing water on the hob or microwaving tea

Look, I think @Zorral has it right.  Most Americans get their hot caffeine delivery through coffee and so have a coffee maker.  Honestly, a drip coffee maker is basically an electric kettle with a filter mechanism.  But they don’t see the need for a SECOND small appliance that just makes hot water.  I have an electric kettle and I adore it.  But I’m also a middle aged lady with three cats whose hobbies include crochet and gardening (haven’t picked up solving murders yet, but figure it’s only a matter of time).

Back to the discussion at hand, inquiring minds still want to know what Truss and Sunak think about cats, and more importantly, what Larry thinks about them.

Edited by Mlle. Zabzie
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2 minutes ago, Mlle. Zabzie said:

 

Back to the discussion at hand, inquiring minds still want to know what Truss and Sunak think about cats, and more importantly, what Larry thinks about them.

If you follow him @Number10cat on Twitter I’m sure he’ll make his views known 

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This American has used an electric kettle for years for my.......instant coffee.  I know, I know but that's the way it is.  I like to drink iced tea at home so I just the tea bags into a container w/water and right into the fridge.  No boiling needed, just a little time.     :P

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11 hours ago, kiko said:

British curry is lumps of meat with lumps of...lumps(?) with lumpy sauce in various shades of brown. Every time I go to England I get invited to eat it. :( My host really loves it. So I know all the best curry places in Derby, which is good, right?

 

I gotta say, for someone who has spent a few months in India, the best Indian food I've ever had (on two occasions) was in the UK. While I was still in heaven since I got to eat it everyday, the food in India was actually milder in most cases then I expected, granting its a huge country with massive differences in cuisine from region to region.  

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