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UK Politics: who's in charge today?


mormont

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Apparently only candidates with 100 supporters can run, which means that there could be a straight run-off between Mordaunt and Sunak if the numbers fall as they did last time and both wanted to run.

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11 minutes ago, Fragile Bird said:

Lol, so the Queen is dead and Boris can come back because those side-by-side pictures of her alone at Philip’s funeral and him partying at #10 won’t work anymore?

:P
 

eta: so Covid really is gone in the UK?

I had it last month after dodging it for 2.5 years (maybe had it Feb 2020 but no way to be sure).

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5 minutes ago, Werthead said:

Apparently only candidates with 100 supporters can run, which means that there could be a straight run-off between Mordaunt and Sunak if the numbers fall as they did last time and both wanted to run.

While Johnson has his supporters, I don’t imagine, after this debacle, that most will want the spectre of more scandals or even the committee finding against hin forcing yet another contest. They need someone to get them to 2024, never mind actually win.

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8 minutes ago, Werthead said:

Apparently only candidates with 100 supporters can run.

Seems to be true and if so, if you're a Tory backbencher, you are going to get very little peace this weekend. They will be bombarded with texts, calls, emails, friendly visits to twist their arms.

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15 minutes ago, Derfel Cadarn said:

While Johnson has his supporters, I don’t imagine, after this debacle, that most will want the spectre of more scandals or even the committee finding against hin forcing yet another contest. They need someone to get them to 2024, never mind actually win.

Unlikely. I mean you are suggesting that Mordaunt and Sunak could gather 200+ votes by MPs. That would mean a sizeable number of their headbanger brigade would vote for either of them.

My guess: One of Sunak or Mordaunt versus one clown the ERG fields. Could be Cruella, could be Badenoch, or Johnson for all I care to know.

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28 minutes ago, Werthead said:

Apparently only candidates with 100 supporters can run, which means that there could be a straight run-off between Mordaunt and Sunak if the numbers fall as they did last time and both wanted to run.

Is it possible there'd be a situation where there's no candidate able to wrangle 100 supporters given how fractured, demoralised, and generally fucked the Tories are at the moment.

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10 minutes ago, Poobah said:

Is it possible there'd be a situation where there's no candidate able to wrangle 100 supporters given how fractured, demoralised, and generally fucked the Tories are at the moment.

They wpuld then presumably reduce the field by one or two, until someone hit 100

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According to Sky, at the moment Johnson has 19, Mordaunt has 6 and Sunak has 21 known backers. May well come down to Sunak and Johnson. If both get 100+ and it goes to the upper-middle class old rich white members who picked Truss, then it’s very likely to be Johnson.

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34 minutes ago, Derfel Cadarn said:

According to Sky, at the moment Johnson has 19, Mordaunt has 6 and Sunak has 21 known backers. May well come down to Sunak and Johnson. If both get 100+ and it goes to the upper-middle class old rich white members who picked Truss, then it’s very likely to be Johnson.

Told you so. 

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13 minutes ago, Tywin et al. said:

In the US the Speaker of the House technically doesn’t have to be a member of Congress. Does the PM have to be a member of the HoC? The interwebs suggest it’s more tradition than a hard rule.

I think it works the same as in Canada, the PM doesn’t have to be a member but it’s very awkward if they aren’t. They usually run in a bye-election asap. Some volunteer steps down from their seat, and by courtesy the opposition doesn’t run anyone against them. Or runs someone who isn’t a match to the pm. 

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The PM need not be a member of Parliament, technically, but to be able to command the confidence of a majority of the House of Commons without being a member of it would be... well, bizarre even by recent standards. I'm not sure such a Prime Minister could even take questions in the Commons.

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On 10/18/2022 at 7:51 AM, Varysblackfyre321 said:

There’s also been discussion among Tory mps in bringing back Mae.

Eventually I think there will be an attempt rescuerct thatcher.

Why would any of them want the job?

On 10/19/2022 at 12:10 PM, mormont said:

No political party has ever voluntarily done this to my knowledge. Parties cling to power with a tenacity that would put a limpet armed with superglue to shame. Intellectually they may understand the argument but they can never accept it.

It's depressing to think they aren't trying to lose the next election. 

25 minutes ago, Tywin et al. said:

In the US the Speaker of the House technically doesn’t have to be a member of Congress. Does the PM have to be a member of the HoC? The interwebs suggest it’s more tradition than a hard rule.

The PM is appointed by parliament. Parties vote of their own leader. It naturally follows that the leader of the party with the most seats will win that vote. A party member who voted for someone else would have some explaining to do.  

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I heard that the PM need not be leader of the party. Liz can stay on as Leader, thereby not requiring a vote among the members, and someone else can be installed as PM by the MPs.

Might piss off the party members, but then again they ought to collectively say "fair enough, we forced Liz onto you, so we can't be trusted." Though they could also collectively say to the MPs "you gave us Liz as an option, so can you be trusted?"

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True. you might get a situation where there's an election with no clear mandate for any party and people agree to a compromise candidate. There may even be instances where that's happened and I just can't think of one. 

No chance Truss stays on as leader. The Tories will pick a new one and that person will be prime minister for a few months.

-

I'm constantly reminded of a statement by Dr Mark Blyth about the last UK general election where he said, "Corbyn doesn't want to win that election." He goes on to say (more or less) that if Corbyn wins, he'll be inheriting a mess (eg. delivering Brexit).

If he loses, he steps down as party leader, kicks back on the opposition bench, and gets to watch the party of Margaret Thatcher destroy itself. Blyth must have a crystal ball or something. 

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