Jump to content

Titanic Horror! Tourist Submersible Goes Missing While Attempting to View Wreckage of Titanic.


Parsons
 Share

Recommended Posts

At least it looks as if the passengers weren't suffocated after days waiting for rescue. The RL conversations I've had about it have been uncomfortable – tending to trail off into a pause and thoughts of what they might be suffering. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Spockydog said:

This dude reportedly waited 8 hours before reporting the sub was missing. 

I haven't followed the story super closely, but I believe I heard they knew a loss of contact could happen, so if he waited 8 hours that lines up when they would have been expected to be getting back close to the surface.

Either way, I'm not sure faster reporting would have helped. And now the company is saying they're dead. I'm curious if the families can still sue despite the contracts the passengers signed. It seems clear at this point this sub was poorly built and every government should quickly put standards and regulations in place for this kind of shit. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, dog-days said:

At least it looks as if the passengers weren't suffocated after days waiting for rescue. The RL conversations I've had about it have been uncomfortable – tending to trail off into a pause and thoughts of what they might be suffering. 

Yeah, now i know they probably died pretty quick i can spend more time thinking about it without having my skin crawl.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Darryk said:

Really bummed out about this. Was sure they'd be rescued. We can get a vessel to the bottom of the ocean but can't get anything down to rescue that vessel?

There are only a handful of human craft that can even get down that deep. Military submarines and rescue vessels  don't operate at anywhere near that depth. It's a miracle they were able to get anything down to find them at all. 

Though it seems based on these reports there was nothing to rescue as it may have been crushed on the decent. On the other hand them finding it near the Titanic may indicate they started the tour got suck for some reason and the Titan failed due to sustained pressure. We'll likely no more after the press conference. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, LongRider said:

Think of all the new conspiracy theories, and tiktok and youtube vids that would be inspired by this. ugh 

Like the ones from Q-World already suggesting that this is a Black Op to distract from Hunter Biden. Yeah. That's the world we live in now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, Darryk said:

Really bummed out about this. Was sure they'd be rescued. We can get a vessel to the bottom of the ocean but can't get anything down to rescue that vessel?

Yes there is;  The US Navy, The Flyaway Deep Ocean Salvage System (FADOSS) is a portable, ship lift system designed to provide reliable deep ocean lifting capacity of up to 60,000 pounds for the recovery of large, bulky, and heavy sunken objects such as aircraft or small vessels.

Flyaway Deep Ocean Salvage System (FADOSS) > United States Navy > Displayy-FactFiles

Amazing technology. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Rippounet said:

Seven hells, I've tried to avoid this story but it keeps popping up everywhere I go, so I'll just say it: Stockton Rush deserves a Darwin award for this mess. I'm sorry about the people he took down with him (quite litterally), but that guy was a textbook example of an arrogant rich fuck who thought he knew better than everyone else.

Exactly my opinion when I read earlier this major league asshole was saying "Safety is overrated, if you fear any risk, you'll never leave your bed". Well, he got exactly what he deserved. With luck, this will actually help push people to consider safety. and actual risk assessment. Some parts of the right-wing (though not only there of course) seemingly love Nassim Taleb, and I guess he must have a field day reading about this deadly debacle.

Still, thankfully for them, it's probably been a very fast death, and hopefully they didn't see it coming (at least not for long).

 

5 hours ago, LongRider said:

Plus, they worked cheap, what was the worst that could happen?  The story is so quintennial capitalistic American; hire the cheapest workers, buy the cheapest gear and supplies, call yourself a genius, a forward thinker and innovator.  Come ride my exciting death sub.

Had the CEO not been in the sub - which proves, imho, that he was actually terribly dumb as well -, the level of cheap cost-cutting and the ridiculous way they approached tech and went for making big bucks for grotesquely low cost would've made me consider this an even more brazen "let's steal from my fellow uber-wealthy" scheme than Madoff's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Tywin et al. said:

And now the company is saying they're dead. I'm curious if the families can still sue despite the contracts the passengers signed. It seems clear at this point this sub was poorly built and every government should quickly put standards and regulations in place for this kind of shit. 

 

I feel like given all the info coming out now it surely wouldn't be difficult to make the argument that whatever consent they gave cannot possibly have been informed? Unless the waiver specifically stated 'we've got parts here the company that makes them only rates to 1,300 meters but we're going four times that deep' and similar things they were surely deceiving their victims. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, polishgenius said:

 

I feel like given all the info coming out now it surely wouldn't be difficult to make the argument that whatever consent they gave cannot possibly have been informed? Unless the waiver specifically stated 'we've got parts here the company that makes them only rates to 1,300 meters but we're going four times that deep' and similar things they were surely deceiving their victims. 

I'm not a lawyer and obviously have not seen the consent forms they signed, but my guess is if they said we have a top of the industry tourism sub though it might fail could void each contract and they can sue. If they told them straight up we're sending you down in something that might be a piece of shit, their families likely cannot. We'll see though I doubt people that rich would get on something they knew was junk. The governments involved in the search should absolutely sue them into extreme debt though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The liability waiver is very very very many pages.  It includes the information that the craft is an experimental model, is not regulated, and there is most definitely the opportunity to die if one embarks on it.

In some ways ... this has me thinking of the Age of Exploration, and how European consented to sail out of and off the world, in order to Find Out/To See/To Conquer/to Make A Big Score/to live forever in history/to teach the rest of the world the true religion.  This hadn't changed by the time of the Arctic explorers either.  Many knew their chances of death were very high, including the commanders.

Many thought Theodore Roosevelt's Amazon exploration trek was more than ill-advised, particularly as he took one of his sons (which was fortunate for him and everyone else; more than once, while TR was even incapacitated, he managed something that kept the little group going and alive). That TR survived was a miracle in particular. Tthey had a fortunate outcome. And they brought back valuable information of all kinds. And you betcha, TR is alive and well in history, and even in some the fields which interested him and which did investigation -- not to mention of course North Dakota history!  :cheers: 

What seems different here -- is that going down to the Titanic in an experimental submersible doesn't fill any of the criteria of the Explorers who have lived in history, whether or not they died, or others died, on the expeditions. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, LongRider said:

Yes there is;  The US Navy, The Flyaway Deep Ocean Salvage System (FADOSS) is a portable, ship lift system designed to provide reliable deep ocean lifting capacity of up to 60,000 pounds for the recovery of large, bulky, and heavy sunken objects such as aircraft or small vessels.

Flyaway Deep Ocean Salvage System (FADOSS) > United States Navy > Displayy-FactFiles

Amazing technology. 

Look up the Glomar Explorer, Howard Hughes and the CIA salvaging a Soviet sub.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...