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US Politics: Dominoes falling, GOP failing, what a time to be alive!


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House looks to punish its own with dueling censure resolutions and potential ouster of George Santos
Significant attendance issues are expected in the House this week
, which could complicate the censure and expulsion efforts.

https://www.politico.com/live-updates/2023/11/01/congress/house-votes-mtg-santos-tlaib-censure-expulsion-00124702

The House on Wednesday will get to work on three privileged resolutions filed last week to punish two lawmakers and kick one — George Santos (R-N.Y.) — out of the chamber completely.

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1 hour ago, IheartIheartTesla said:

Having not stepped on a college campus for ages now, I have to ask whether they have become hotbeds of antisemitism since the Israel-Hams conflict, or is this one of those culture war wedges right wing media is propping up right now? Or is the truth somewhere in between, perhaps.

Idk how widespread it is, but it is a thing. When I was in college just over a decade ago there was a big pro-Palestinian protest which I had no issue with. They were calling for the end of Israel, but whatever, college kids typically lack wisdom. However, when the Jewish student group tried to approach them and talk they started throwing shit at them and the university said both sides were at fault. 

There does seem to be some kind of overcorrection among a lot of well educated liberals and it shows up on college campuses. What makes it sad to me is most of the Jewish students probably agreed with a lot of the grievances, just not for the calls to end Israel as a Jewish state.  

Edited by Tywin et al.
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Yeah, it would be nice if colleges remained one of the safe bastions in American society where opposing viewpoints could be debated and people could learn about other's life experiences, but that dream has been dead for a while now.

At any rate, the other part that is sad about this is how Ivy Leagues used to discriminate against Jews in the early 20th century (what with the Jewish quota and so on). After WWII, however, many Jewish academics and students thrived in US universities in a classic case of the pendulum shifting the other way. Now I fear it may have been a golden age whose time has come to pass.

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1 hour ago, IheartIheartTesla said:

Yeah, it would be nice if colleges remained one of the safe bastions in American society where opposing viewpoints could be debated and people could learn about other's life experiences, but that dream has been dead for a while now.

I don't know if the dream is dead, but it's probably a good deal less possible than it was even 10 years ago.

I'm hoping the glorification of terrorism is limited to a small fringe, but I don't know what the numbers look like. I try to remind myself that a lot of the worst takes on the left come from the idealism of youth, and they'll usually grow out of it.

But then again, the world is changing, the right wing is certainly getting scarier all over the world, and colonial-type injustice and violence will never fail to inflame a desperate sense of righteousness. If radical rhetoric is indeed spreading, it may well be used as a pretext for radical actions. I sure hope not.

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2 hours ago, Tywin et al. said:

There does seem to be some kind of overcorrection among a lot of well educated liberals and it shows up on college campuses. What makes it sad to me is most of the Jewish students probably agreed with a lot of the grievances, just not for the calls to end Israel as a Jewish state.  

I think overcorrection describes a good deal of the disagreements I have with my own side of the ideological spectrum. We'll start with a decent enough concept, but then we'll come up with an absurdly overbroad interpretation, apply it way, way too widely, until that concept has become dogma. (Will Smith and the Slap Heard 'Round the World was a microcosmic yet apt example.) If I wanted dogma, I'd be a conservative.

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4 hours ago, IheartIheartTesla said:

I have to ask whether they have become hotbeds of antisemitism since the Israel-Hams conflict, or is this one of those culture war wedges right wing media is propping up right now?

Absolutely the bolded.  It's been relentless the amount of money in so many ways the extremists have been pouring into campuses.  One of the objectives is to rid higher education of all the humanities by defunding them.

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2 hours ago, TrackerNeil said:

I think overcorrection describes a good deal of the disagreements I have with my own side of the ideological spectrum. We'll start with a decent enough concept, but then we'll come up with an absurdly overbroad interpretation, apply it way, way too widely, until that concept has become dogma. (Will Smith and the Slap Heard 'Round the World was a microcosmic yet apt example.) If I wanted dogma, I'd be a conservative.

It's like we're all in our own personal primaries. 

Also, Ha!:

Quote

Senate GOP Leader Mitch McConnell bluntly warned Republican senators in a private meeting not to sign on to a bill from Sen. Josh Hawley aimed at limiting corporate money bankrolling high-powered outside groups, telling them that many of them won their seats thanks to the powerful super PAC the Kentucky Republican has long controlled.

According to multiple sources familiar with the Tuesday lunch meeting, McConnell warned GOP senators that they could face “incoming” from the “center-right” if they signed onto Hawley’s bill. He also read off a list of senators who won their races amid heavy financial support from the Senate Leadership Fund, an outside group tied to the GOP leader that spends big on TV ads in battleground Senate races. On that list of senators: Hawley himself, according to sources familiar with the matter.

https://www.cnn.com/2023/10/31/politics/mitch-mcconnell-josh-hawley-citizens-united/index.html

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2 hours ago, Bironic said:

Can someone explain to me why 31 democrats sided with the majority of republicans no to expel George Santos?

 

 

As per Chris Hayes reporting on msnbc last night, they want Santos to “hang around the necks of [especially] NY republicans who won in Biden districts like an albatross”. (Paraphrasing)

and it has to do w/ this as well:

https://youtu.be/c5dBxa4wdj4?si=L8344mHusQliaH7O

Edited by kissdbyfire
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3 hours ago, Bironic said:

Can someone explain to me why 31 democrats sided with the majority of republicans no to expel George Santos?

 

 

Politics over principle.  They like having Santos making Republicans look bad.  It’s embarrassing.

Santos should never have been seated in the first place.

:angry:

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3 hours ago, Bironic said:

Can someone explain to me why 31 democrats sided with the majority of republicans no to expel George Santos?

 

 

There's only been 5 members of the House expelled in US history; 3 who joined the Confederates in the Civil War and 2 who were convicted of felonies. I can see the argument that the standard for expulsion should remain as high as it has been; and Santos hasn't been convicted of anything yet.

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5 hours ago, Bironic said:

Can someone explain to me why 31 democrats sided with the majority of republicans no to expel George Santos?

I believe there was some concern that the House shouldn't expel a member until the ethics folks finish their investigation, which I suppose makes some sense. I don't know how rigorous an investigation one could expect from that committee, though; seems as though half the goddamn House GOP caucus are either insurrectionists or insurrection apologists.

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3 hours ago, IheartIheartTesla said:

The Tlaib censure also failed through bipartisanship. Wish they could use their shared disdain as common grounds for something more productive, like passing a bill.

Nice to see that a white supremacist who supported an insurrection got slapped down for accusing someone else of being anti-Semitic and supporting an insurrection.

Again, every Republican claim should be viewed as projection. 

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