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Ramsay B.
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Give Blue Eye Samurai a try, folks, even if you aren't normally into animation. It looks very good, but it's got a strong story and voice cast, and some amazing fight sequences while also managing to consistently explore central and sometimes complicated themes. Voice cast includes Kenneth Branagh, Ming-Na Wen, George Takei, Randall Park, Maya Erskine, Brenda Song, and more. Oh, and Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa in what may be one of his best ever roles.

It has some definite and deliberate nods to past Japanese chanbara films, like Lady Snowblood and Seven Samurai, and more modern takes on the same with some use of more modern music (including at least one needle-drop used in Kill Bill).

Edited by Ran
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I watched an interesting German film called "Der vermessene Mensch" (Measures of Men is the English title). It follows a German ethnologist who gets roped into the Herero and Namaqua genocide (perpetrated by the German Empire in German South West Africa (now Namibia) between 1904 and 1908) and has some very critical things to say about how the scientific establishment cooperated with this genocide (and thus helped lay the foundations of the atrocities of WWII).

It was a very effective film and ends with a plea to repatriate the remains of the victims of the genocide from German museums back to Namibia. It's quite shocking to think that these collections, which I don't think have any scientific relevance whatsoever, still haven't been given a proper reburial.

I also rewatched The Little Mermaid (1989). It's one of my least favourite Disney films, but I actually liked it a lot more this time around. You can sort of see them perfecting the formula that would really bring the Disney Renaissance about, so while it isn't as effective as later films from that fruitful period, I do have to give it a lot of credit for that.

 

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2 hours ago, Ran said:

Give Blue Eye Samurai a try, folks, even if you aren't normally into animation. It looks very good, but it's got a strong story and voice cast, and some amazing fight sequences while also managing to consistently explore central and sometimes complicated themes. Voice cast includes Kenneth Branagh, Ming-Na Wen, George Takei, Randall Park, Maya Erskine, Brenda Song, and more. Oh, and Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa in what may be one of his best ever roles.

It has some definite and deliberate nods to past Japanese chanbara films, like Lady Snowblood and Seven Samurai, and more modern takes on the same with some use of more modern music (including at least one needle-drop used in Kill Bill).

On my list. Excited for it.

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15 hours ago, Ran said:

Give Blue Eye Samurai a try, folks, even if you aren't normally into animation. It looks very good, but it's got a strong story and voice cast, and some amazing fight sequences while also managing to consistently explore central and sometimes complicated themes. Voice cast includes Kenneth Branagh, Ming-Na Wen, George Takei, Randall Park, Maya Erskine, Brenda Song, and more. Oh, and Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa in what may be one of his best ever roles.

It has some definite and deliberate nods to past Japanese chanbara films, like Lady Snowblood and Seven Samurai, and more modern takes on the same with some use of more modern music (including at least one needle-drop used in Kill Bill).

I watched the first episode of this last night, very much enjoyed it. Animation style is beautiful and the story seems straightforward enough and designed for western audiences in a way that I can get on board with.

I was going to avoid this actually, after I saw it pop up on Netflix the other day. I have been really struggling to get into recent animations. I started the latest series of Castlevania, but it really didn't grab me at all. Then I noticed Onimusha and thought that was intriguing but the whole animation style was giving me Bakshi flashbacks and that makes me shudder.

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16 hours ago, Veltigar said:

I also rewatched The Little Mermaid (1989). It's one of my least favourite Disney films, but I actually liked it a lot more this time around. You can sort of see them perfecting the formula that would really bring the Disney Renaissance about, so while it isn't as effective as later films from that fruitful period, I do have to give it a lot of credit for that.

 

This, Beauty & the Beast and Aladdin were prime Disney period for me. When I was a kid there was just the faded-loooking stuff like Jungle Book. These three films looked totally different to that. And I guess The Lion King as well, but for some reason I don't feel any attachement to that film...the voice cast is great - perhaps it is just too sad and I am refusing to engage with it because of that?

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2 minutes ago, Isis said:

This, Beauty & the Beast and Aladdin were prime Disney period for me. When I was a kid there was just the faded-loooking stuff like Jungle Book. These three films looked totally different to that. And I guess The Lion King as well, but for some reason I don't feel any attachement to that film...the voice cast is great - perhaps it is just too sad and I am refusing to engage with it because of that?

How dare you! The Lion King is the best Disney movie ever! It's Hamlet, but with lions and a happy ending!!!

And the 90's videogame based on the movie was awesome! 

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Little Mermaid is kind of a weak movie, as a movie, but in comparison to the new live action version is like high art handed down by the gods! 
 

I will say that my kids loved all the Little Mermaids songs from when they were just 6 months old. Alongside Frozen there is some sort of magic in the soundtracks to those movies that even newborns can recognise. 

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Woke up in the middle of the night and turned on something I thought looked easy to fall asleep to. Guess I was wrong. Survive is a really solid movie. It's about a suicidal young woman (Sophie Turner) who survives a plane crash with one other person and together they have to battle the elements and their personal demons. The acting and writing is pretty good and the cinematography is excellent. I'd recommend this one if you're into the genre. 

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Finished The Fall of the House of Usher.

The way it wove various references from  Poe's works into the story was fun, but the show is definitely much weaker than the other Mike Flanagan shows (at least those I've seen - Hill House, Bly Manor and Midnight Mass, which were all masterpieces; I didn't get the time to watch The Midnight Club when it came out, but I'm going to next). It doesn't have the narrative or emotional complexity of these shows, the theme and message is pretty straightforward, and the plot was quite predictable throughout (after you've seen episode 1, you knew in particular how episodes 2-7 would go). The characters also didn't have much complexity and weren't portrayed in a way you could get emotionally attached to them, especially Roderick's children (their characterizations felt more like "look what weirdos they are").

On that last point, I think this really puts that common "everyone on Succession is unlikeable" argument in sharp perspective. If you want to see *really* unlikable, unsympathetic rich characters, watch TFOTHOU. You can then compare characters that are a**hole losers that shouldn't be "likable" but are still engaging and sympathetic due to the writing and performances, and characters that are really not.

Edited by Annara Snow
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4 hours ago, Annara Snow said:

Finished The Fall of the House of Usher.

The way it wove various references from  Poe's works into the story was fun, but the show is definitely much weaker than the other Mike Flanagan shows (at least those I've seen - Hill House, Bly Manor and Midnight Mass, which were all masterpieces; I didn't get the time to watch The Midnight Club when it came out, but I'm going to next). It doesn't have the narrative or emotional complexity of these shows, the theme and message is pretty straightforward, and the plot was quite predictable throughout (after you've seen episode 1, you knew in particular how episodes 2-7 would go). The characters also didn't have much complexity and weren't portrayed in a way you could get emotionally attached to them, especially Roderick's children (their characterizations felt more like "look what weirdos they are").

On that last point, I think this really puts that common "everyone on Succession is unlikeable" argument in sharp perspective. If you want to see *really* unlikable, unsympathetic rich characters, watch TFOTHOU. You can then compare characters that are a**hole losers that shouldn't be "likable" but are still engaging and sympathetic due to the writing and performances, and characters that are really not.

Yep Succession handled ‘Rich Dysfunctional Families’ better but that entire show is built around it…this one tackles many different themes including horror. I found it to be better than Bly Manor personally and up there with his other shows 

Edited by Ser Rodrigo Belmonte II
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19 minutes ago, Annara Snow said:

On that last point, I think this really puts that common "everyone on Succession is unlikeable" argument in sharp perspective. If you want to see *really* unlikable, unsympathetic rich characters, watch TFOTHOU. You can then compare characters that are a**hole losers that shouldn't be "likable" but are still engaging and sympathetic due to the writing and performances, and characters that are really not.

Yeah that's a good point actually, and might be the reason I dropped out of Fall of the House of Usher. I kind of loved all the characters in Succession and I miss them greatly. I mostly just hated everyone in Usher.. they weren't sympathetic at all. 

Right now I'm pretty down on Mike Flanagan, it's only Midnight Mass that I loved and everything else is all kinds of meh for me. 

Edited by Heartofice
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8 minutes ago, Ser Rodrigo Belmonte II said:

Yep Succession handled ‘Rich Dysfunctional Families’ better but that entire show is built around it…this one tackles many different themes including horror. I found it to be better than Boyd Manor personally and up there with his other shows 

I really don't understand why so many people dislike Bly Manor. To me it was such a great show that kept surprising me and dealt beautifully with the complex themes of love, loss, grief, memory, with every character (including the one who was kind of the villain of the show) getting a complex characterization and backstory that were all so well woven into the haunted house story.

 

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4 hours ago, Annara Snow said:

I really don't understand why so many people dislike Bly Manor. To me it was such a great show that kept surprising me and dealt beautifully with the complex themes of love, loss, grief, memory, with every character (including the one who was kind of the villain of the show) getting a complex characterization and backstory that were all so well woven into the haunted house story.

 

Honestly? I just got bored with it. The story didnt grip me as much as his other shows and i wasnt invested enough in the protagonist to continue.

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Watched Fincher's The Killer, starring Michael Fassbender. I think it's an exacting and meticulous little thriller from Fincher, and quite enjoyed it. It takes the original graphic novel and really boils it down to its essence, stripping away some of the many convoluted deaths and instead refining them to something ... well, exacting and meticulous. Fassbender's character and Fincher are birds of a feather, in a way. 

Did love the running gag of his aliases mostly being 70s sitcom characters (I think Sam Malone was the only exception). 

I wouldn't call this one of his best, but as with all Fincher films, it's worth seeing if you just love what he does.

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9 hours ago, Annara Snow said:

Finished The Fall of the House of Usher.

The way it wove various references from  Poe's works into the story was fun, but the show is definitely much weaker than the other Mike Flanagan shows (at least those I've seen - Hill House, Bly Manor and Midnight Mass, which were all masterpieces; I didn't get the time to watch The Midnight Club when it came out, but I'm going to next). It doesn't have the narrative or emotional complexity of these shows, the theme and message is pretty straightforward, and the plot was quite predictable throughout (after you've seen episode 1, you knew in particular how episodes 2-7 would go). The characters also didn't have much complexity and weren't portrayed in a way you could get emotionally attached to them, especially Roderick's children (their characterizations felt more like "look what weirdos they are").

On that last point, I think this really puts that common "everyone on Succession is unlikeable" argument in sharp perspective. If you want to see *really* unlikable, unsympathetic rich characters, watch TFOTHOU. You can then compare characters that are a**hole losers that shouldn't be "likable" but are still engaging and sympathetic due to the writing and performances, and characters that are really not.

Very much agree. The cast was excellent, visuals, sets, etc but found the show very underwhelming for all the reasons you’ve mentioned. 
And irt your comment below (below the post I’m quoting obviously) about Bly Manor, agree as well, though I really disliked it the first time I tried. Ended up watching half an episode and quit. Gave it another go recently and really enjoyed it. 
 

Also watched The Killer last night… I really like Fincher and Fassbender, so was very much looking forward to it. To put it simply, I didn’t like it. It’s not terrible, there’s too much talent involved in it. Still, easily my least favourite from both Fincher and Fassbender. I watched it very late at night and I was very tired, so maybe I should try again in a while to see if my opinion changes, which is entirely possible and has happened before. But I thought it was borderline boring. I found the whispery inner monologue of a nihilistic assassin tiring. I also think (maybe incorrectly?) that it was too dark, reminded me of big battle scenes in the abomination at times. And sorry fans, but the whiny The Smiths soundtrack in the background practically throughout didn’t help one bit. :D

ETA: the best thing in The Killer is Tilda Swinton, as usual. :wub:

Edited by kissdbyfire
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