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I think that it's a quote from 'Free Cities' video ('Game of Thrones - History and Lore' - videos added to CDs with GoT).

So, unless there is any evidence in the books, it should be changed/deleted.

 

Welcome back, Westerosi. I didn't have much time last months, so I was only 'lurker' here.

Matt, aka BlueTiger

;)

Unless it's a quote directly from GRRM, I don't think it should be on there, thus I removed it.

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Rolland Storm appears in ASOS, in Davos VI:

His companions kept pace, matching their strides to his own. The Bastard of Nightsong had a pox-ravaged face and an air of tattered chivalry;

...

The Bastard of Nightsong joined them at the cellar door.

...

"These two?" asked Ser Rolland of the guards, when he had closed and barred the gate.

Drag them into a cellar, " said Davos. "You can cut them free when Edric's safely under way."

The BAstard gave a curt nod.

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Twelve years before the Doom of Valyria (114 BC), Aenar Targaryen sold his holdings in the Freehold and the Lands of the Long Summer and moved with all his wives, wealth, slaves, dragons, siblings, kin, and children to Dragonstone, a bleak island citadel beneath a smoking mountain in the narrow sea.

So did the Doom happen in 114 or 102 BC?

Edited by The Wondering Wolf

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Aegon the Conqueror's invasion of the Seven Kingdoms is currently titled as "War of Conquest", but I haven't found that specific phrasing in ASOIAF. GRRM frequently uses "Aegon's Conquest" or just "the Conquest". "Wars of Conquest" is used in the appendices for AGOT and ADWD and twice in TWOIAF. Any objection if I move the article to "Aegon's Conquest"?

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I updated those pages. It's major events that are the reference points. The Doom was such a reference point. The Targaryens leaving Valyria not.

When he book first came out, I found it a bit confusing too, but thinking about it, and looking at it with more detail, it really is about the Doom taking place in 114 BC.

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This came up in the small questions thread and I thought I'd post it here. The wiki lists Chella as the leader of the Black Ears clan on her page and on the Black Ears page. One page lists the Feast appendix as a source, the other Tyrion VII from Game. Neither of these sources indicate that she is the head of the Black Ears clan. She's clearly the head of the group that travels with Tyrion, but we don't know that that is the entire Black Ears clan. For what it's worth someone in small questions pointed out that Timmet is not the absolute leader of the Burned Men, but just a war chief. 

 

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This came up in the small questions thread and I thought I'd post it here. The wiki lists Chella as the leader of the Black Ears clan on her page and on the Black Ears page. One page lists the Feast appendix as a source, the other Tyrion VII from Game. Neither of these sources indicate that she is the head of the Black Ears clan. She's clearly the head of the group that travels with Tyrion, but we don't know that that is the entire Black Ears clan. For what it's worth someone in small questions pointed out that Timmet is not the absolute leader of the Burned Men, but just a war chief. 

 

The appendices for AFFC and ADWD label Shagga, Timett, Chella, and Crawn as "clan chiefs from the Mountains of the Moon". The app includes:

  1. "A massive, strong but slow clansman of the Mountains of the Moon, Shagga is a chieftain of the Stone Crows."
  2. *"A red hand of the clan of the Burned Men, Timett son of Timett ...."
  3. *"Chella is a member of the Black Ears ..." (Cheyk's gender is not mentioned)
  4. Crawn does not have an entry. Poor Crawn.

 

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The appendices for AFFC and ADWD label Shagga, Timett, Chella, and Crawn as "clan chiefs from the Mountains of the Moon". The app includes:

  1. "A massive, strong but slow clansman of the Mountains of the Moon, Shagga is a chieftain of the Stone Crows."
  2. *"A red hand of the clan of the Burned Men, Timett son of Timett ...."
  3. *"Chella is a member of the Black Ears ..." (Cheyk's gender is not mentioned)
  4. Crawn does not have an entry. Poor Crawn.

 

Oh alright, my mistake then I didn't see that part.

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It seems the mountain clans may have multiple chief(tains), however. Gunthor is the chief of the Stone Crows encountered by Tyrion and Bronn in AGOT. While Gunthor remains in the Vale during the WOT5K, his fellow Stone Crow Shagga accompanies Tyrion. Gunthor is still active in the Vale as of AFFC, while the later books also call Shagga (who is active in the kingswood) a chief.

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Since joining the wiki editing community is apparently not available for the moment I can't make these changes myself, but I wanted to share some errors I've found.

On the page for Haegon I Blackfyre it says "Haegon Blackfyre was the fourth son of Daemon I Blackfyre. He was the heir to his younger brother, Daemon II Blackfyre."  Younger should be older.

On the page for King-beyond-the-Wall the outdated '150 years ago' instead of 226 AC is used for the dating of Raymun Redbeard's invasion.

On the page for Pact of Ice and Fire it says that Joffrey Velaryon was the one who flew north instead of Jacaerys Velaryon.  I believe that Joffrey flew to the Vale but Jace flew to the north, correct?  This ambiguity seems to be present at places in other articles relating to them and their dragons.

The articles for Tytos Lannister and Reyne-Tarbeck rebellion have the incorrect date of 254 AC for Genna Lannister's betrothal to Emmon Frey (252 AC instead).

A whole host of articles have the outdated (since the publication of TWOIAF) date of 212 AC for the Second Blackfyre Rebellion and the events of The Mystery Knight.  Just searching '212' in the search box brings up articles such as Aegon V Targaryen, House Sunderland, Whitewalls, and Whitewalls tourney, among others, that need to be updated to 211 AC.

The article for Master of whisperers says that “Although not titled master of whisperers, Brynden Rivers, known as Lord Bloodraven, had a network of spies while serving on Daeron II Targaryen's small council. He later became Aerys I Targaryen's master of whisperers as well as Hand of the King."  Is this what the texts actually say or is this extrapolation (I don't actually know, I don't have the books available to me right now)?

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The article for Master of whisperers says that “Although not titled master of whisperers, Brynden Rivers, known as Lord Bloodraven, had a network of spies while serving on Daeron II Targaryen's small council. He later became Aerys I Targaryen's master of whisperers as well as Hand of the King."  Is this what the texts actually say or is this extrapolation (I don't actually know, I don't have the books available to me right now)?

It should probably be cited there, but it's based on this post by Ran:

 

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Since joining the wiki editing community is apparently not available for the moment I can't make these changes myself, but I wanted to share some errors I've found.

On the page for Haegon I Blackfyre it says "Haegon Blackfyre was the fourth son of Daemon I Blackfyre. He was the heir to his younger brother, Daemon II Blackfyre."  Younger should be older.

On the page for King-beyond-the-Wall the outdated '150 years ago' instead of 226 AC is used for the dating of Raymun Redbeard's invasion.

On the page for Pact of Ice and Fire it says that Joffrey Velaryon was the one who flew north instead of Jacaerys Velaryon.  I believe that Joffrey flew to the Vale but Jace flew to the north, correct?  This ambiguity seems to be present at places in other articles relating to them and their dragons.

The articles for Tytos Lannister and Reyne-Tarbeck rebellion have the incorrect date of 254 AC for Genna Lannister's betrothal to Emmon Frey (252 AC instead).

A whole host of articles have the outdated (since the publication of TWOIAF) date of 212 AC for the Second Blackfyre Rebellion and the events of The Mystery Knight.  Just searching '212' in the search box brings up articles such as Aegon V Targaryen, House Sunderland, Whitewalls, and Whitewalls tourney, among others, that need to be updated to 211 AC.

I think I caught and corrected all of these now. If you find any more, please do tell!

 

It should probably be cited there, but it's based on this post by Ran:

 

Yeah, the source was hidden on the edditing page for some reason.

Btw, how did you do the fancy quoting of that post? :) 

Edited by Rhaenys_Targaryen

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Btw, how did you do the fancy quoting of that post? :) 

Yeah that's a nice feature I hadn't encountered before today. It just sorta happened? I didn't do anything special, just pasted the link.

Edited by RumHam

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Yeah, if you paste a link to a specific post, it'll automatically do that pretty nifty quote. :)

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Very  fancy! :) I like it!

 

@Ran, I actually have a question I had been hoping to ask you, and All-seeing Aye's post reminded me of this.

In The Mystery Knight, Dunk tells us that the Redgras Field was 16 years ago.

TWOIAF (Daeron II), describes that the First Blackfyre Rebellion began in 196 AC, and lasted nigh on a year. The app, entry for Maekar I Targaryen, tells us that the Redgrass Field occured in 196 AC as well, meaning the Rebellion both began and ended in 196 AC.

The TWOIAF chapter on Aerys I tells us that the Second Blackfyre Rebellion, depicted in TMK, occured in 211 AC. But looking at Dunk's statement of it having been 16 years ago, shouldn't that be 212 AC? Or is Dunk misremembering here? In The Sworn Sword, he specifies the Redgrass Field as having been fifteen years ago, when recalling the deaths of Ser Eustace's sons. And it sounds like he got that tale from Ser Eustace himself, who would definitly know when his sons died, exactly.

Especially with the Redgrass Field apparently occuring late in 196 AC, the statement of sixteen years ago would point to 212 AC for TMK, wouldn't it?

Could you perhaps clarify this a bit?

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On the wikipage of house Stark it is stated that Brandon the daughterless is the Lord in the legend of Bael the bard, but as far as i know the name of the lord in this legend is never mentioned therefore that Brandon the daughterless is the lord from this legend is based purely on his nickname.

Since twoiaf actually said that Bael might not have existed at al should it not be mentioned on the page that this is speculation?

on the page about Brandon the daughterless it does say "supposedly" but there two it is impleid heavely that Brandon is mentioned as the person in this legend instead of it beëing speculation based on his nickname. 

I could be wrong about this but of the two sourses mentioned on the page of Brandon the daughterless neither actually point to Brandon one is about Bael and the other about when the Boltons supposedly stoped flaying people and wearing there skins.

Edited by direpupy

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On the wikipage of house Stark it is stated that Brandon the daughterless is the Lord in the legend of Bael the bard, but as far as i know the name of the lord in this legend is never mentioned therefore that Brandon the daughterless is the lord from this legend is based purely on his nickname.

Since twoiaf actually said that Bael might not have existed at al should it not be mentioned on the page that this is speculation?

on the page about Brandon the daughterless it does say "supposedly" but there two it is impleid heavely that Brandon is mentioned as the person in this legend instead of it beëing speculation based on his nickname. 

I could be wrong about this but of the two sourses mentioned on the page of Brandon the daughterless neither actually point to Brandon one is about Bael and the other about when the Boltons supposedly stoped flaying people and wearing there skins.

From ACOK, Jon VI:

Jon had never heard this tale before. "Which Brandon was this supposed to be? Brandon the Builder lived in the Age of Heroes, thousands of years before Bael. There was Brandon the Burner and his father Brandon the Shipwright, but—"

"This was Brandon the Daughterless," Ygritte said sharply. "Would you hear the tale, or no?"

 

 

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Thanks i guess i somehow read over that, but are there any other mentions of Brandon the daughterless i thougt he was part of the list of statues named by Bran but i just checked and he is not, this could mean that Brandon the daughterless did not exist at al. Afterall Bael's existens is questioned in twoiaf since he is not present in the records of Winterfell.

If that is the case shouldend that  be mentioned on the wikipage of Brandon  altough it already says "supposedly" it to me at least was not weary clear.

but again thanks for the quote.

Edited by direpupy

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