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Guy Gavriel Kay

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Hm, I always thought the single moon was intentional. There's a scene in UH where the main character and a few others are in a pleasure house, where one of the others is a poet and he says that one day he may write a poem about a world with two moons.


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Indeed. Very deliberate in UH to clearly identify it as not being in the same setting as any of the previous novels.


Edited by Ran

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Due to forum upgrade ,posts made on/after 14th got lost,so am posting this again.

 

Guy Gavriel Kay Explores Fantasy Renaissance Europe in New Novel Children of Earth and Sky

 

Publication date confirmed: May 2016 for both US and UK editions.

 

We also have a blurb :

 

 

The bestselling author of the groundbreaking novels Under Heaven and River of Stars, Guy Gavriel Kay is back with a new novel, Children of Earth and Sky, set in a world inspired by the conflicts and dramas of Renaissance Europe. Against this tumultuous backdrop the lives of men and women unfold on the borderlands—where empires and faiths collide.

 

From the small coastal town of Senjan, notorious for its pirates, a young woman sets out to find vengeance for her lost family. That same spring, from the wealthy city-state of Seressa, famous for its canals and lagoon, come two very different people: a young artist traveling to the dangerous east to paint the grand khalif at his request—and possibly to do more—and a fiercely intelligent, angry woman, posing as a doctor’s wife, but sent by Seressa as a spy.

 

The trading ship that carries them is commanded by the accomplished younger son of a merchant family, ambivalent about the life he’s been born to live. And farther east a boy trains to become a soldier in the elite infantry of the khalif—to win glory in the war everyone knows is coming.

 

As these lives entwine, their fates—and those of many others—will hang in the balance, when the khalif sends out his massive army to take the great fortress that is the gateway to the western world…

 

http://www.brightweavings.com/journal/2015/07/not-a-slow-news-day/

 

 

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Also Hodderscape's release on it suggests that it's a "return" to his setting of earlier novels -- i.e. Lions, Sarantine Mosaic, and Last Light of the Sun. Inle-rah was closer to the mark than I was, since it does seem to be set near the Fall of Sarantium (but before it, not after), with a khalif who must be something of an equivalent to Mehmed II.

 

Quite exciting!

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So what time period and place might be the real world equivalent? Fall of Constantinople?

 

Could that be the " great fortress" on the borders of the two worlds?

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Surprised this isn't related to the previous two books.  I would like to see Kay tackle the Mongol invasion of eastern Europe. -- hell, let them invade all of Europe.

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Sounds very interesting. I think the title Children of Earth and Sky threw a few of us for a  loop. Thanks for the updates everyone. I'm looking forward to this title next year.

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Was thinking about getting a few books tonight and Kay seems like as good as any to try out. What is his best work and a good place to start with him?

Tigana is the only thing I've read by him, but it's generally regarded as one of his best. It's a fantasy stand-alone and I had a great time with it.

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Was thinking about getting a few books tonight and Kay seems like as good as any to try out. What is his best work and a good place to start with him?

Read only Tigana and is is wonderful. One of the best fantasy books I've ever read and certainly the best standalone one.

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Lions of Al-Rassan, from what I have read (I'm 80% through atm) is a brilliant book. It's very very low on fantasy elements (As far as I can tell there is only really visions from the son of a main character) but the characters are all well developed, the plot is pretty fast-paced, there's no real bloat, and the writing is great. Highly recommend it so far, I've had trouble putting it down if I'm honest

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Lions of Al-Rassan, from what I have read (I'm 80% through atm) is a brilliant book. It's very very low on fantasy elements (As far as I can tell there is only really visions from the son of a main character) but the characters are all well developed, the plot is pretty fast-paced, there's no real bloat, and the writing is great. Highly recommend it so far, I've had trouble putting it down if I'm honest

That is the post I was looking for. Definitely going to read it in the future.

Kay's writing is really good. Tigana had as perfect writing as it can be.

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Lions of Al-Rassan, Tigana, and Under Heaven are probably his three best works and are all standalone (well, Under Heaven has a sort-of-sequel but it's very distant, not necessary, and a bit shit), so a beginner should pick one of those.


Under Heaven is his best for me. Lions of Al-Rassan might have beaten it but unfortunately I did feel it flubbed the ending. Although my view isn't in the majority.

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Under Heaven is great. Loved River of Stars also. But my favorite is Sarantium duology. Amazing. I think it is much better than Lions and Tigana.

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Lions of Al-Rassan, Tigana, and Under Heaven are probably his three best works and are all standalone (well, Under Heaven has a sort-of-sequel but it's very distant, not necessary, and a bit shit), so a beginner should pick one of those.
Under Heaven is his best for me. Lions of Al-Rassan might have beaten it but unfortunately I did feel it flubbed the ending. Although my view isn't in the majority.

I finished it today and I kind of agree with you. The ending was a bit of a drop in quality from the rest of the book. I still thought it was a great book, but wasn't wild on the ending.

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It's always the most remarkable thing when people discuss their favourite Kay novels, we've had quite a few of such discussions over the last 15 years here with different participants. Everybody has a different favourite. There's no consensus whatsoever. Really speaks to the consistent great writing that Kay produces.

 

Though having said that, one can acknowledge that Ysabel, Last Light of the Sun and River of Stars rarely, if ever, come up as the no.1.

The praise for Song for Arbonne has faded as well, and while I personally loved the Fionavar Tapestry and still see that as one of the best epic fantasy trilogies ever, it's not a series that ranks the highest amongst fans in general.

 

Hopefully Children of Earth and Sky will rank among the very best.

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It's always the most remarkable thing when people discuss their favourite Kay novels, we've had quite a few of such discussions over the last 15 years here with different participants. Everybody has a different favourite. There's no consensus whatsoever. Really speaks to the consistent great writing that Kay produces.

 

Though having said that, one can acknowledge that Ysabel, Last Light of the Sun and River of Stars rarely, if ever, come up as the no.1.

The praise for Song for Arbonne has faded as well, and while I personally loved the Fionavar Tapestry and still see that as one of the best epic fantasy trilogies ever, it's not a series that ranks the highest amongst fans in general.

I've noticed the same that there's little consensus. I've also seen a lot of people who love some of his books and really didn't like some of the others and again there's no consistency about which are the loved and which are the hated books.

 

Looking on Goodreads, the highest average rating is for [i]Lions of Al-Rassan[/i] which is marginally ahead of [i]Lord of Emperors[/i]. [i]Ysabel[/i] and [i]Last Light of the Sun[/i] are a considerable distance behind his other novels in terms of popularity.

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