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Angalin

Small Questions XIII

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The Long Night- is this a ONE Time event in history, from when the Others first attacked and the sun hid for years? Or does this Long Night come every winter?

Also, somebody said GRRM told everyone he'd reveal the reason for season disparity at the end of the series. I was unaware of this, does anyone know where he said that?

The Long Night is a one-time thing that happened 8,000 years before GoT, a winter that lasted generations and was ended by Azor Ahai. All the other winters are just regular winters that vary in length.

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I just wanted to pose a quick question whether the Others, the White Walkers, and the wights beyond the Wall are all the same or different "species". Sometimes it sounds like they're all the same, but sometimes it sounds like the wights (i. e. the resurrected bodies of dead "normal" people) are only servants or agents of the real Others, and we haven't really seen any real Others yet, only wights. So what's the deal?

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I just wanted to pose a quick question whether the Others, the White Walkers, and the wights beyond the Wall are all the same or different "species". Sometimes it sounds like they're all the same, but sometimes it sounds like the wights (i. e. the resurrected bodies of dead "normal" people) are only servants or agents of the real Others, and we haven't really seen any real Others yet, only wights. So what's the deal?

There are indications in the text that there is a difference between the white walkers and the wights. The wights are dead humans (wildlings, members of the Night's Watch) and animals. The white walkers could be the ones using the wights as a weapon. We have seen two white walkers so far. One in the prologue to AGOT and one in a scene in ASOS (I think) where Sam killed a white walker.

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There are indications in the text that there is a difference between the white walkers and the wights. The wights are dead humans (wildlings, members of the Night's Watch) and animals. The white walkers could be the ones using the wights as a weapon. We have seen two white walkers so far. One in the prologue to AGOT and one in a scene in ASOS (I think) where Sam killed a white walker.

Moreover there is some argumentation on what is meant by "Others". Some people think that the term "Others" refers to the White Walkers while others believe that it refers to White Walkers and wights as well.

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Thanks for your replies. I think I get confused because the people in the books that we hear talking about all those creatures don't seem quite clear themselves about the differences, if there are any.

Sam is referred to as "having slain an Other", but most of what we've seen elsewhere are "just" wights...

Do they *look* the same then (both zombie corpses with bright blue eyes), or do they look different? Can you tell the difference just by looking at them?

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I don't think they look the same, and I think characters can tell the difference. I've always thought the Others had the glowing blue eyes, but now I'm not sure if that is from the books or the tv series prologue.

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Do they *look* the same then (both zombie corpses with bright blue eyes), or do they look different? Can you tell the difference just by looking at them?

White walkers aren't described as looking at all zombielike (that is, in a clear state of undeath, entrails hanging out, etc) in the two instances they've been on screen. They wear odd armor and crystalline swords, and speak an unknown language in a voice that sounds like cracking ice.

Wights just look like humans as they died, with new shiny blue eyes.

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White walkers aren't described as looking at all zombielike (that is, in a clear state of undeath, entrails hanging out, etc) in the two instances they've been on screen. They wear odd armor and crystalline swords, and speak an unknown language in a voice that sounds like cracking ice.

Wights just look like humans as they died, with new shiny blue eyes.

plus white walkers are described in AGoT as tall, pale (flesh white as milk) and bright blue eyes.

Hmmmm not bad looking if you as me ;)

[edit: "if you ask me" that was....]

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plus white walkers are described in AGoT as tall, pale (flesh white as milk) and bright blue eyes.

Hmmmm not bad looking if you as me ;)

But to have them in your bed ... extremely cold feet - and hands :devil:

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When Aegon the Conqueror wiped out the House of Harren the Black, he supposedly allowed the Ironborn to choose who would have primacy over them, and they chose House Greyjoy. My question is this: According to AFFC, there has been no Kingsmoot held in several thousand years. So how were the Greyjoys picked? Did they secretly cut a deal with Aegon and the whole "choosing" thing is a lie, or is there some other method the Ironborn used to pick them?

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But to have them in your bed ... extremely cold feet - and hands :devil:

never thought of it that way.... :rolleyes: but you know what they say :"cold hands, warm heart". Maybe they are misunderstood, lovable fellows after all :P

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[edit: message's body deleted]

@tze: No, sorry thought I had the answer but my mistake :blushing: All I can find is that "Aegon let the surviving ironborn lords choose their own overlord, and they chose Lord Vickon Greyjoy". Probably they all sat around a large table with lots of wine....

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Just a question that i have not seen asked around here. What and who actually killed the dragons? I think somewhere one of the maesters infer that the dragons were killed by magic and not "brave men". so have I missed something or this hasn't been mentioned?

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Just a question that i have not seen asked around here. What and who actually killed the dragons? I think somewhere one of the maesters infer that the dragons were killed by magic and not "brave men". so have I missed something or this hasn't been mentioned?

It depends on what you believe. Maester Marwyn believes that the dragons were slain by maesters who dislike magic;I believe a maester from ADWD posits that the enemies of Valyria only managed to slay dragons with magic. Stories seem to indicate that knights have pulled off the deed multiple times, but this would seem to be after the degradation of the dragons; the first dragons in Westeros all seem to have died of old age. Tyrion suggests that dragons may be slain through the eyes, and cautions that attacking through the mouth is a good way to get killed.

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Going along with the popular theory that jon will come back by warging into his wolf then when his body comes back as an WW he will move back into his body and be all hardcore like coldhands... Does this mean Varamyr is a sentient WW too? We know he is still in his wolf atm... But his dead body was left in the snow so surely would return? How does this work? He said that the woman saw him but didnt mention his own body... I'm really confused...

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Just a question that i have not seen asked around here. What and who actually killed the dragons? I think somewhere one of the maesters infer that the dragons were killed by magic and not "brave men". so have I missed something or this hasn't been mentioned?

The last dragon in Westeros died under the reign of Aegon III, who always disliked them because his mother was fed to one as method of execution during the Dance of Dragons, but he sent mages to hatch the remaining eggs he had left but it didn't work out.

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Is the armorer in Kings Landing where Grenly apprenticed associated with the Faceless men at all? The description of the weirwood and ebony doors on my second read through got me thinking...

Another faceless-man related question related to when the Alchemist kills Pate in the prologue of AFFC. Why is the Alchemist allowed to kill Pate to achieve his goal, when Arya was not allowed to kill anyone other than the specified target on her first mission?

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