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mcb

Two kings to wake a dragon

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Why do archeaological discoveries get older the further down you dig below the surface, then?

In any case, I am happy to assume that no sinking occurs in Martin world, for some reason. In that case, the tombs just started out deep and they built newer levels above them in later years. Magical foresight, as I said. The fact remains, the older Kings are on the lower levels as per the text.

Because there's a tendency for dirt, mud, etc. to accumulate at the top. You're right that this tendency exists. But buildings that have been in constant use usually get cleaned regularly, renovated, and donĀ“t become ruins. That way, they stay above ground because the dirt is collected elsewhere, and the structures don't crumble. If these conditions are met, you get the Parthenon and Colosseum, the Pyramids and Stonehenge. Most buildings are not in constant use for millennia though, and there the rule that older stuff is further below ground holds true.

Winterfell has been in constant use though, so we simply cannot assume that it has sunk deeper over time.

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He has the castle of Moat Cailin sinking but then you have the excuse of it's boggy ground so.

Moat Cailin was also where the Children apparently magicked the sea across to create the neck in some battle or other. Either to stop the Andals or during their wars with the first men.

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The physical world works differently in Westeros, or GRRM didn't care to add too much science to his SFF novel, not that it matters. I wonder, for example, how deep structures can be built in an area of underground springs and geothermal activity -- seems to me that at a certain point the builder would find himself up to his neck in hot water, har har. Good point about the absence of earthquakes, too, because hotsprings often appear where there's a lot of techtonic activity, or, as in the case of Yellowstone, over a big-ass magma pool that's just biding its time before it blows and ends civilization as we know it.

I also wonder why another fortress wasn't built on the site of Moat Cailin since it's such an important site for the defense of the North.

Eh, details, details.

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I also wonder why another fortress wasn't built on the site of Moat Cailin since it's such an important site for the defense of the North.

Eh, details, details.

Presumeably when it was first built there wasn't a massive marsh covering the whole area, The reason it's so hard to assault is that the causeway is the only solid footing, so any army would have to go up it between the towers, exposing themselves, to get to any one of the tower. There simply isn't enough solid ground to rebuild another castle, and the Moat was pretty much impregnable as it was, why bother?

It's quite hard to visualise the layout, I'd love to see a diagram of the layout.

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