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The books coming out in 2013


Lord of Rhinos

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Hi, all! I'm so excited at the two upcoming novels in L.E. Modesitt, Jr.'s Imager Portfolio that I'm posting here for the first time.

Imager's Battalion (Jan. 22, 2013): http://www.lemodesittjr.com/the-books/imager-portfolio/imagers-battalion/

Antiagon Fire (May 28, 2012): http://www.amazon.com/Antiagon-Fire-Imager-Portfolio-Modesitt/dp/0765334577/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1353766517&sr=1-1&keywords=antiagon+fire [Note: This novel and date aren't listed on the author's website.]

I'm a huge Modesitt fan, having read almost all of his published works, and the Imager Portfolio is one of my favorite series. Here's a synopsis of the first part of the series. There are some mild spoilers for the first three books. http://www.tor.com/blogs/2011/11/a-look-back-at-the-imager-portfolio-series-by-le-modesitt-jr

Thanks for this list, BTW. It's awesome and I'm always on the lookout for other SF/F authors.

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I really enjoyed the last one, and am looking forward to this one. The one in Australia was a bit of a slog (well, Australia, what can you expect?) but I liked all the ones leading up to it as well. Dunno why the series has become such a pariah after one middling book.

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I really enjoyed the last one, and am looking forward to this one. The one in Australia was a bit of a slog (well, Australia, what can you expect?) but I liked all the ones leading up to it as well. Dunno why the series has become such a pariah after one middling book.

I think many feel that the plot has gotten away from the author leading to what basically amounts to a Grand Tour for dragons ie trips to Africa, Australia, and Brazil. Personally, I think Novik only had enough material for a few books, but then the series took off and the publisher asked her to write more only she didn't really have anything to use to stretch it out.

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Some updated information on The Grim Company:

The difference between a hero and a killer lies in the ability to justify dark deeds. But this is the Age of Ruin. And there are no heroes... Introducing the epic fantasy series of 2013.

The grey granite walls of Dorminia rise to three times the height of a man, surrounding the city on all sides save for the south, where the Broken Sea begins. The stone is three-foot thick at its weakest point and can withstand all but the heaviest assault. The Crimson Watch patrol the streets even as Salazar's Mindhawks patrol the skies.

The Grey City was not always so. But something has changed. Something has broken at its heart. Perhaps the wild magic of the dead Gods has corrupted Dorminia's Magelord, as it has the earth itself. Or perhaps this iron-fisted tyranny is the consequence of a lifetime of dark deeds...

Still, pockets of resistance remain. When two formidable Highlanders save the life of a young rebel, it proves the foundation for an unlikely fellowship. A fellowship united against tyranny, but composed of self-righteous outlaws, crippled turncoats and amoral mercenaries. A grim company. But with the world entering an Age of Ruin, this is not a time of heroes...

Waterstones is currently offering a £5 discount for those who preorder the hardback online. You just need to enter the code SF4893 at the checkout.

Also, tweet #GRIMCOMPANY@HoZ_Books for a chance to win one of five signed copies.

I realise that without samples I might as well be posting guff like The Grim Company is perfect for fans of the Hobbit, Star Wars, and the Bible, but I am assured at least two or three chapters will be available on the Head of Zeus site very soon.

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I am going to be the nitpickiest person ever...but those do not sound like very impressive Medieval city walls.

Stop the press! There's a typo! That should be three-thousand-foot thick. And "all but the heaviest assault" does, of course, refer to direct meteor impact.

Much more impressive than Martin's Wall, I'll tell you that much. He's basically a wall-building amateur compared to me.

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Much better!

(You can get away with the "height of three men" - Jerusalem's city walls are 5 meters at their lowest spot, and Talinn's earliest (13th C, according to wiki.)"... wall was less than 5 m high and about 1.5 m thick at its base.[1] Since that time it has been enlarged and strengthened." The 3 feet are a bit skimpy thought, as you can see. Sorry, i'll stop with the Wikipedia zombie roam. Must resist!)

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Yeah, I'd mark the paperback releases or maybe make a separate list. The first post of this thread has pretty good list too.

A few that may or may not have been mentioned yet:

February - Fade to Black, Francis Knight

April - Water Knife, Paolo Bacigalupi

May - Dangerous Women, GRRM & Dozois

June - Siege and Storm, Leigh Bardugo

August - The Adjacent, Christopher Priest

Is Dangerous Women confirmed for May 2013? Dunc and Egg 4 done ??

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A book that struck my interest:

The Golem and the Jinni, by Helen Wecker, due on April 23rd.

A marvelous and absorbing debut novel, an enchanting combination of vivid historical fiction and magical fable about two supernatural creatures in turn-of-the-century immigrant New York.

An immigrant tale that combines elements of Jewish and Arab folk mythology, Helene Wecker's dazzling debut novel tells the story of two supernatural creatures who arrive separately in New York in 1899.

Chava is a golem, a creature made of clay, brought to life to by a disgraced rabbi who dabbles in dark Kabbalistic magic. When her master-the husband who commissioned her-dies at sea on the voyage from Poland, she is unmoored and adrift as the ship arrives in New York harbor in 1899.

Ahmad is a jinni, a being of fire, born in the ancient Syrian desert. Trapped in an old copper flask by a Bedouin wizard centuries ago, he is released accidentally by a tinsmith in a Lower Manhattan shop. Though he is no longer imprisoned, Ahmad is not entirely free-an unbreakable band of iron around his wrist binds him to the physical world.

Overwhelmed by the incessant longing and fears of the humans around her, the cautious and tentative Chava-imbued with extraordinary physical strength-fears losing control and inflicting harm. Baptized by the tinsmith who makes him his apprentice, the handsome and capricious Ahmad-an entity of inquisitive intelligence and carefree pleasure-chafes at monotony and human dullness. Like their immigrant neighbors, the Golem and the Jinni struggle to make their way in this strange new place while masking the supernatural origins that could destroy them.

Surrounding them is a colorful cast of supporting characters who inhabit the immigrant communities in lower Manhattan at the turn of the nineteenth into the twentieth century: the café owner Maryam Faddoul, a pillar of wisdom and support for her Syrian neighbors; the solitary Ice Cream Saleh, a damaged man cursed by tragedy; the kind and caring Rabbi Meyer and his beleaguered nephew Michael, whose Sheltering House receives newly arrived Jewish immigrants; the adventurous young socialite Sophia Winston; and the mysterious Joseph Schall, a dangerous man driven by ferocious ambition and esoteric wisdom.

Meeting by chance, Chava and Ahmad become unlikely friends whose tenuous attachment challenges their opposing nature-until the night a terrifying incident drives them back into their separate worlds. But a powerful threat will soon bring the Golem and the Jinni together again, challenging their existence and forcing them to make a fateful choice.

Marvelous and compulsively readable, The Golem and the Jinni weaves strands of Yiddish and Middle Eastern literature, historical fiction and magical fable into a wondrously inventive and unforgettable tale

And another one, due in March, Child of Vengeance by David Kirk. This one reimagines the life of Musashi Miyamoto.

Japan in the late 16th century was a land in turmoil. Lords of the great clans schemed against each other, served by aristocratic samurai bound to them by a rigid code of honor. Bennosuke is a high-born but lonely teenager living in his ancestral village. His mother died when he was a young boy, and his powerful warrior father Munisai has abandoned him for a life of service to his Lord, Shinmei. Bennosuke has been raised by his uncle Dorinbo, a Buddhist monk who urges the boy to forgo the violence of the samurai and embrace the contemplative life. But Bennosuke worships his absent father, and when Munisai returns, gravely injured, Bennosuke is forced to confront truths about his family's history and his own place in it. These revelations soon guide him down the samurai's path—awash with blood, bravery, and vengeance. His journey will culminate in the epochal battle of Sekigahara—in which Bennosuke will first proclaim his name as Mushashi Miyamoto. This rich and absorbing epic explores the complexities of one young man's quest while capturing a crucial turning point in Japanese history with visceral mastery, sharp psychological insight and tremendous narrative momentum.
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If the Doors of Stone comes out next year it'll definitely be number one on my list of things to read. It is a book that I'm honestly a bit nervous about and excited about. Which of course ends up being a pretty awesome way to look at a book. Excited because the series is great IMO blah blah blah. Nervous because he has so much material to cover in one book and if he still plans on doing the second present tense trilogy he has a lot of set up to do for Kvothe.

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