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brashcandy

From Pawn to Player: Rethinking Sansa XIV

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Lyanna - lovely post on Tyrion, I agree completely. Great analysis. I'm still sad about not having the 'like' button anymore.

But I really like how you pointed out how Sansa really does see Tyrion as a Lannister and has no reason for thinking otherwise (mostly because, as much as he 'hates' his family, he is a Lannister first and foremost)

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I agree Milady. Tyrion's offer to Sansa was about making himself feel better, not about realistically giving Sansa a chance to refuse him or alleviate her misery.

The choice Tyrion gave her was been stomach and lung cancer. Neither is an attractive option for Sansa, either way she is being shackled to a horrible fate. The fact that she agreed to do her "duty" as the king commanded doesn't speak in favor of Tyrion much at all, rather it shows that Sansa understands how little choice she had her. She's going to be made a Lannister that day no matter what.

My big takeaway from their marriage is just how unique Sansa's reaction to him is compared to other characters. I've seen much made of Sansa's words that he was "kind" to her in posts before but I think it's missing the context of the word kind here. Sansa is basically saying that she appreciates that he didn't force himself on her and left her alone, for the most part. It's a kindness compared to what her fate could have been but it really doesn't speak that well of him. Her strongest feeling is still that he made a Lannister of her. I think her thoughts about Tyrion during the day of the PW are also very important. After the wedding, Tyrion is talking about his love for Jaime and Sansa thinks that he is looking at her as if he wants something and then thinks that she has no bread to give him and why he won't leave her alone. I believe her thoughts here are incredibly revealing when it comes to the sham of their marriage. It's the only time in the series where Sansa genuinely has no "bread" for another character. She had some for Jeyne, Sandor, Dontos, Lollys, Sweetrobin, and even Lancel. It's important to note from her thoughts that it is not just a matter of Sansa not knowing how to respond to Tyrion - she does not want to. She feels no instinct to comfort and she does not want to figure out how to help. Sansa just wants him to leave her alone. I think her thoughts in just these couple of lines here tell us just how she views marriage to him. I'd say she feels some resentment towards him for his part in her forced marriage, even if she does not vocalize it or even mentions that he was "kind" a few times.

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MODERN RETELLINGS - VILLENEUVE PT 1

The story of Beauty and the Beast was originally written by Madame Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve, in 1740. This story was then abridged and modified in 1757 by Madame Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, and this is the version we know today. The 1949 film, La Belle et la Bête, is based on Beaumont’s story.

Most of us are familiar with Beaumont’s version, or at least the Disney film, but what was the story originally like? What was its message? With these questions in mind, let’s take a look at Villeneuve’s story.

*snipped for length*

This is wonderful :) Anxiously awaiting the rest. I can see we'll have lots to talk about!

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Forgive the lack of meaningful contribution in this post, but given the lack of like buttons, I just wanted to say that I think Lyanna's appearance analysis and Lea Lea's on the original B+tB are really outstanding. I'm honestly super excited for the second half (I confess I'm not so familiar with the original version of the story, so I was completely enraptured as I was reading).

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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST - BY MME DE VILLENEUVE - PART 2

Every night, the Beast would ask her how her day went and then ask the question that would put an end to Beauty’s good humour: “do you want to sleep with me?”. She always answered “no”, but one night she wondered: “What is to be the end of all this? The question he puts to me every time, ‘will I sleep with him’, shows me that he persists in loving me: his gifts to me confirm it. But though he does not insist on my compliance, and though he does not show resentment to my refusals, who is to say that one day he will not lose his patience, and that my death shall be the result?”.

Very astute observation by Beauty, and something we have discussed in the PTP. The Beast seems unfazed by Beauty’s refusals, not like Tyrion, who looked like he had been “slapped in the face” when Sansa said she might not ever want to sleep with him. And still Beauty feared that one day the Beast would lose his patience and kill her. We don’t get any POVs from Sansa when she is married, but I think it is only natural that this would also be something that she would think about. One day, Tyrion would take what was “his” (and indeed he does think about it), and no one would stop him.

Every night, Beauty would also dream about the agreeable fellow who looked like Cupid. This particular night when she was thinking about her fate, he asked her what was wrong. She said she was in love with him, and so the Beast’s wish to marry her [note: this is the first time in the story where the verb épouser (marry) is used instead of coucher (sleep)] distressed her greatly – and would even if the Beast was handsome.

He replied that she should love the one who loved her, see past appearances, and free him from his prison.

After a while, Beauty’s eyes grew accustomed to the Beast’s ugliness, but she found his conversation dull and stupid, his compliments clumsy and his questions foolish, though his manners were gentle and he complied to her every wish (seriously, she has a monkey theatre).

What odd advice. “Love the one who loves you”. I guess what she wants and who she loves don’t matter. Some guy loves her, so she should love him back, and care not for his appearance.

A lot of people say Sansa should stop being shallow and learn to love Tyrion. Except that I don't think Tyrion loves her. He thinks her stupid and childish, deceitful and cold, and cares not for who she is as a person, or her feelings. It’s all very well to wish that she would bring him “her joys and sorrows and lust”, but let’s be real, he only cares about her lust (in ADWD he says “my wife does not want me, least of all the part that seems to want her”). And even if he did love her, why should she love him back? I mean, there is literally no reason for her to love him. Unless you count gratitude for not raping her.

Anyway, people keep insisting to Beauty in this story that she should love/say yes to the Beast (btw – the Beast in this story has an elephant trunk and scales. Just sayin’. Imagine sleeping with that). I still don’t really get why. I mean, the Beast seems pretty sincere in his affections, but the fact remains that she is his prisoner. Besides, she doesn’t see him all day, and when they meet at night he “only utters the same five sentences” and answers in monosyllables, and then finishes off with the “will you sleep with me” question. That is hardly an encouraging environment for affection. I mean, it’s very nice that he hasn’t hurt or killed her, and gives her everything she wants, but that’s pretty far from “yes, let’s totally sleep together”.

One night in her dreams the Unknown man (the handsome guy) asked her why she was sad (she was missing her family) and asked if it was because of the sight of the Beast’s ugly face. Then the Beast appeared in the dream, and the Unknown moved to stab him. Beauty surprised herself by jumping in his defense. The Unknown accused her of taking the Beast’s side, and she said it wasn’t so – that she loved the Unknown, but she was grateful for the Beast’s kindness and would not stand to see him harmed.

This reminded me a lot of Littlefinger saying that Tyrion would die and Sansa wondering if that was what she wanted; and also when she defended him to Lysa saying he was “kind” to her. Sansa would very much like to not be married to him, and perhaps not see him again, but she recognizes his “kindness” for not harming her or forcing her to consummate the marriage. The same way, Beauty would love nothing more than to see her family again, and to be with her beloved Unknown, but still she does not want to see the Beast harmed, because he treated her “kindly”.

In another dream, a lady appeared to her, and said: “Courage, Beauty, be a model of female generosity; be as wise as you are charming; don’t hesitate to sacrifice your inclination to your duty. You will take the true path to happiness. You will be happy, provided you pay no mind to deceitful appearances”.

Eh, this again. She sounds like Septa Mordane, doesn’t she? Sacrifice your wishes to duty; duty is the path to happiness; forget about appearances and you’ll be happy… “Septa Mordane said all men are beautiful, find his beauty, try”.

With every passing day, Beauty missed her family more, though she tried to hide her tears from the Beast. One day she confessed to him the reason for her sorrows, and he called her ungrateful, accusing her of preferring to live in a poor house with jealous sisters than live in luxury with his affections. She assured him it was nothing of the sort, she just missed her family a lot, and would like to visit them for two months and then come back. He said yes, “though it might kill him”.

At night her Unknown man said that she should stay longer than two months away in order to kill the Beast, who was only a monster and of no use to the world. “Is it to be counted a misfortune that your happiness should cost only the life of a monster?”

Beauty was angry at this, saying that she would lay down her life to save his, and that “this Monster, who is only one in form, has a heart so humane, that he should not be persecuted for a deformity for which he cannot be blamed”.

Again the Unknown playing the part of Littlefinger here. And some divergences from ASOIAF: sorry folks, but in my opinion Tyrion is every bit as ugly on the inside as he is on the outside. He thinks people persecute him for his ugliness, but it’s actually because of his actions. I don’t think he has a “heart so humane” though sometimes he can be kind. And when Tyrion was arrested for Joff’s murder, Sansa didn’t really insist to go back and lay down her life to save his (not that she murdered Joff), however “grateful” she might have been to him. A question: do you think, in the future, if her happiness depended on it, Sansa would be ok with someone murdering Tyrion?

Of course the other character who has a “deformity” is Sandor, and him I’m sure Sansa would insist should not be killed. Unfortunately, again, he isn’t actually an innocent guy with a human heart, but a pretty ruthless killer.

[to be continued again! sorry guys, this is just a really long story. Thanks to Brash and Butterbumps! for the kind words :) ]

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Every night, Beauty would also dream about the agreeable fellow who looked like Cupid. This particular night when she was thinking about her fate, he asked her what was wrong. She said she was in love with him, and so the Beast’s wish to marry her [note: this is the first time in the story where the verb épouser (marry) is used instead of coucher (sleep)] distressed her greatly – and would even if the Beast was handsome.

He replied that she should love the one who loved her, see past appearances, and free him from his prison.

After a while, Beauty’s eyes grew accustomed to the Beast’s ugliness, but she found his conversation dull and stupid, his compliments clumsy and his questions foolish, though his manners were gentle and he complied to her every wish (seriously, she has a monkey theatre).

What odd advice. “Love the one who loves you”. I guess what she wants and who she loves don’t matter. Some guy loves her, so she should love him back, and care not for his appearance.

Ahh Lady Lea, I am in love with your B&B analysis and i am glad to hear there is more to come!! :D

About this particular bit of "Love the one who loves you." It reminded me of Cersei in a way. We know (or are pretty confident LF's advice won't manage to have such an influence on Sansa for her to start this) that Sansa isn't about to use men the way Cersei did. she may in the 6th book flirt with HtH but not to the extent cersei did with the kettleblacks... in this and in so much more, sansa isn't like cersei. i believe, in the years before the events of AGoT, that cersei was in jaime to some degree cause he made her feel strong and secure (that she had him to always turn to and would not disappoint her), and since she wasn't as "in love" with him as he was with her (since she wanted to marry rhaegar) she still went through with their affair cause it made her feel safe that she would always have someone who loved her and she could use.

i can't see Sansa doing this. she wants to be loved for herself, but not so she can manipulate them and make her feel better

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Thanks Caro! :)

I'm thinking about this... do you guys think "love the one who loves you" is good advice?

I suppose it could be useful advice for arranged marriages (like Mordane's advice to try to find beauty in every man) as it is quite practical, but it definitely negates the wishes and the agency of the woman.

My mother always told me to not waste love on someone who doesn't love me, but I think it's not quite the same advice.

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I think that "Love the one who loves you" is the sort of "advice" that stalkers use as a mantra to justify their actions, i.e. "I love her, so she must love me," or "I love her so she should love me." I think this implicitly imposes a kind of imperative on the loved party, such that being loved by someone means that you owe them love back. Which I think is a really unhealthy way to view love, personally, but I think this is a persistent sentiment, unfortunately (one I saw recently being used as justification for revenge by one character on another who had not returned his love for her).

And I had no idea the extent to which Disney lied to me was so great on this matter. They certainly presented a much different "blossoming of love" in the animated version of this, if I recall.

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Thanks Caro! :)

I'm thinking about this... do you guys think "love the one who loves you" is good advice?

I suppose it could be useful advice for arranged marriages (like Mordane's advice to try to find beauty in every man) as it is quite practical, but it definitely negates the wishes and the agency of the woman.

My mother always told me to not waste love on someone who doesn't love me, but I think it's not quite the same advice.

I agree that it's not. The former advice puts the power squarely in the hands of someone else; don't mind how you might feel, just concentrate on them loving/wanting you and everything will work out. It completely diminishes the legitimacy of the woman's feelings in this case. On the other hand, your mother's advice speaks to being able to recognize when a person doesn't return your affections, as Sansa does with Ser Loras, and to not waste time chasing after useless dreams.

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And I had no idea the extent to which Disney lied to me was so great on this matter. They certainly presented a much different "blossoming of love" in the animated version of this, if I recall.

Disney based the story on Beaumont's version, so I'll reserve my judgement until we get to that... To be honest I'm more horrified by the constant requests of the Beast to sleep with Beauty. I mean, gosh, how do you tell that story to children??

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Disney based the story on Beaumont's version, so I'll reserve my judgement until we get to that... To be honest I'm more horrified by the constant requests of the Beast to sleep with Beauty. I mean, gosh, how do you tell that story to children??

If I heard that when I was a kid, I would just have taken it to be an invitation to sleep in the same bed, kind of like a sleepover.

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i think it is not good advice. it may have "worked" for Cersei for a time, but look how things are now. If Sansa had applied this method (and if tyrion had cared for her a tiny bit as an actual human being, not a pretty porcelain wife to decorate his life with) i don't think things would have been any healthier in their marriage. love is about two, not only one person putting in all the "dedication".

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If I heard that when I was a kid, I would just have taken it to be an invitation to sleep in the same bed, kind of like a sleepover.

I would too, to be honest, and the verb in French actually has the same connotations as English ('sleep with' as in actually sleep or as in have sex), and I wondered which one the Beast meant. But why would the Beast want a sleepover? (anyway there's a part coming up where another character definitely interprets it as having sex).

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I would too, to be honest, and the verb in French actually has the same connotations as English ('sleep with' as in actually sleep or as in have sex), and I wondered which one the Beast meant. But why would the Beast want a sleepover? (anyway there's a part coming up where another character definitely interprets it as having sex).

Ok, I'll admit, as I was reading the first part, I thought he might have been asking her to sleep with him the same way that one Unsullied hires a prostitute to hug him. But something tells me that's not where this is going.......

ugh....Sleeping Beauty is my fave followed by this one as far as Disney movies go....I knew the dark side of that one, but this is too much now.....but so juicy! (and outstandingly apropos to Sansa here)

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I enjoyed the analysis of Tyrion and Sansa. That was a very nervous time for me, as I truly felt that Sansa may have had to suffer much more cruelty by losing her maidenhood, and possibly even becoming impregnated by Tyrion. Luckily her trips to the godswood helped her stay away, and the fact that Tyrion took kindness (in a way) on her. I still feel like I would have liked to see her go to Highgarden though!

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Really interesting read Lady Lea! Great stuff. :)

Even better, you are giving me lots of feels and inspiration for the Tyrion part 2 now. ;)

Thanks Caro! :)

I'm thinking about this... do you guys think "love the one who loves you" is good advice?

I suppose it could be useful advice for arranged marriages (like Mordane's advice to try to find beauty in every man) as it is quite practical, but it definitely negates the wishes and the agency of the woman.

My mother always told me to not waste love on someone who doesn't love me, but I think it's not quite the same advice.

I think it can be seen in two ways.

The first is definitely the stalkerish "you should be grateful that someone wants you" connotation, whereby it's a duty to love someone back just because they love you.

On the flipside, it can also mean "Don't waste your time on someone who does not appreciate you".

In a more reactionary setting, the first is the one that seems the more likely interpretation, to be sure.

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I would too, to be honest, and the verb in French actually has the same connotations as English ('sleep with' as in actually sleep or as in have sex), and I wondered which one the Beast meant. But why would the Beast want a sleepover? (anyway there's a part coming up where another character definitely interprets it as having sex).

My native language is French and whenever I use the expression coucher avec I mean "to have sex". The 18th century meaning is a bit more ambiguous, but I think in that case, it's pretty clear what the Beast really wants ;).

I really enjoyed reading your posts and liked the parallel you drew between The Beauty and Sansa regarding the "sleeping" issue. Both are prisonners, they don't have the choice but they still manage to say "no". I think it says a lot about their frankness and integrity.

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The English translation made the Beast’s speech much fancier and genteel than it actually was so I just followed the original text).

To judge by the link to Four and Twenty Tales, I see you’ve chosen the Victorian era translation, the same I recommended because it’s one of the first in print, and, naturally, the speech is “too genteel” to our modern ears accustomed to much cruder and less florid prose. Besides, there’s something else to consider: Victorians “sanitised” many foreign works when translating them into English, Villeneuve’s is by no means the first case of a character softened up thanks to some prim Englishman. Did I already mention the case of the first English translations of Cupid and Psyche? Much of the poetry, the double-entendre, the comicality and the symbolism was lost because a certain Elizabethan thought those Romans were way too bawdy for the likes of his countrymen. I have many versions in my possession, thank the Old Gods, including one in Latin, and I appreciate the effort you put into translating the original in French yourself. There are more modern translations of Villeneuve’s, though, like the copy I have, more true to the original.

This ended up taking a different direction than I had originally though, because I didn't think there'd be so many Tyrion parallels.

Because there’s less of the Hound in this version; it seems you were looking for a dog here and instead found more of a certain person half his size :D

It was to be expected, there’s no single Beast, there are many types of Beasts and they’re judged both by their appearances and their behaviour, and classified according to the ending. My own list, based on what I’ve researched so far is this:

a. Ugly, good-hearted. Appearance changes.

b. Beautiful, morally darkish grey. Internal changes.

c. Ugly, morally darkish grey. No changes, his partner is transformed.

d. Beautiful, nasty job, fierce and gentle only to Beauty. Internal change, appearance in perception only.

e. Ugly, nasty job, fierce and gentle only to Beauty. Internal change, appearance in perception only.

f. One thousand per cent plug-ugly, inside and out. No changes.

Villeneuve’s Beast is definitely not the type of Beast the Hound is, so you won’t find much in common.

Another thing I want to comment on, that I’ve seen discussed elsewhere, is how we don’t know the youngest daughter’s name. She is only “the Beauty”. Even though she has other qualities (she’s amiable, kind, cheerful, a good musician, etc), she is reduced to her physical appearance, stripped of her identity and individuality.

Isn’t the Beast also stripped of his identity and individuality and reduced to his physical appearance, according to this logic? Or are we told what his ”name” is in the sense we understand names to be today? No, he’s only Beast, which is not a name, just like Hound or Imp aren’t strictly names either, but Belle can be both a name and a description, lots of names were and are just words for beauty, beautiful, precious, etc. Now look at the Greco-Roman tale: if we were in the shoes of Greek-speaking or Latin-speaking readers from that time, we’d be saying Love and Soul instead of Cupid and Psyche, which sound like names to us, but for the ancients could and would sound merely like words used every day, descriptions of what they are or the role they play, much like you think about Beauty’s perceived lack of a name, and it, instead of annulling their identity, was in fact what set them apart. For them, names were very meaningful, a statement to the bearer’s individuality, no matter how ridiculous they might sound to us if translated; so no giving their babes a name just because it sounded pretty or was en vogue, like we do now. Cupid’s brothers are called Requited Love, Uncontrolled Desire and Yearning!

Besides, why do you automatically assume she’s referred to as Belle solely for her appearance? Isn’t she supposed to be beautiful on the inside as well, isn’t she gentle, compassionate, cheerful, etc.? Belle fits her well then, it encompasses both her looks and her personality. Beast, on the other hand... And one more thing: her other qualities are more evident in Beaumont’s tale, because she placed more value in being a cultivated lady than Villeneuve ever did, who focuses more on looks and a meek character.

Context is important before making such assumptions, apart from what I explained, when in fairy tales “names” are either not mentioned at all and replaced by generic ones –you’ll read a lot of phrases like ”Cook said…” ”Frog went to…” ”Mouse hurried along the…” ”Rose Red thought that…” ”Butterfly flew toward…”–it’s done mostly in the case of anthropomorphic images of immaterial entities, it’s not about individuals. When there’s a name recognizable as such it usually alludes to that person’s most outstanding quality, be it physical or internal, following the ancient example.

First, I really like the winter garden idea. It reminds me of Winterfell. But the really great thing here is the Beast’s speech. It’s so rough, he even curses the man (“Tais-toi, maudit harangueur!”). And yes, it is italicized in the original. Basically you could change The Beast for The Hound and it would be just like a line out of ASOIAF. Compare: “I’m no lord, no more than I’m a knight.” Sandor Clegane snarled at her. (…) “Spare me your empty little compliments, girl… and your sers.”

The Winter Garden is a very prominent motif in a Grimm Bros. tale with B&B elements, posterior to this one. In that one, the sexual symbolism of the rose is more patent than in this. A rose is and never was just a simple rose, not even in Antiquity, it already had symbolism attached to it. One word: Venus. It was her flower.

Thanks for mentioning that line I’d touched in the ”trial.” But the cursing doesn’t parallel the quoted line. There are equivalents of the Beast’s cursing to Sandor’s that are in the books, but this I’m no lord line isn’t one.

I like that the Beast has his own special horse, like Stranger. The Beast’s horse lets other people ride it, but only really obeys the Beast.

Ah, but It’s just a well-trained common horse that knows who his master is and little else. It would be a disservice to dear Stranger to compare him to something far below himself. A more fitting simile is Alexander the Great’s horse, Bucephalus, a fierce stallion, accustomed to battles in heat, snow and rain, travelled far and away with his master, wouldn’t allow anyone to mount him save Alexander himself, was loved and feared, and had an untamable fighting nature that lasted until his death at an advanced age. Now that’s some horse Stranger would not neigh at in contempt.

Beauty, in the summer, asked for a rose. It was an innocent wish, as roses in the summer are quite common.

In this version and Beaumont’s, aye, ‘tis a rose she asks for, my lady. But in others, it’s grapes, a singing bird (a lark) or an unspecified flower. All simple things, yes… on the surface.

‘Cause, my lady, ‘tis no so simple thing. Beast reacted so angrily to this deceptively simple act of plucking a rose from a garden that had plenty of them. That’s what is apparent to the eye. Overreaction, you think? Hardly. Because they were no simple roses. And it was no simple garden. Every rose was precious, it meant a day in his life. You see now, why he demanded the merchant’s life in retribution. He had robbed him of a day of his own and had to pay. The man tried to explain and then offered his daughter in his stead, not good in itself.

Is she guilty? Is she the bringer of destruction to her own family? Her sisters think so… Beauty gets to go instead of her father, while Sansa’s pleas for her father’s life are fruitless

She blamed herself, too, because she thought she’d set the whole thing in motion by asking for a rose her father had no money to buy with, for it was no wild flower to be found anywhere in the countryside as you seem to imply. Besides, they were her stepsisters and him her adoptive father. He was not her real father.

Sansa, in the summer, asked also for a simple thing: to stay in King’s Landing. It was an innocent wish, no one had bothered to inform her of any conspiracies or anything, how could she imagine that her father was actually about to expose the King as a bastard? She also got her wish, but was forced to stay amongst many Beasts (Joffrey, Tyrion, Cersei, Ilyn Payne, Littlefinger, the Hound, etc), shut off from the world, as she had no friends, and the rest of her family. Cersei blames the whole thing on her, accusing Sansa of betraying her father, and so do many readers, who think it is right that Sansa is punished in KL. Actually, we know that Sansa never “spilled her father’s plans” because she didn’t know her father’s plans. Her only wish was to stay in KL.

This is more similar to Psyche’s case than Villeneuve’s Beauty. Psyche’s blamed for a thing she had not say in: in a version, the reason her father went to the Temple was because there was a plague –provoked by certain heavenly people– and he was told it was because of Psyche, who had done nothing and wished nothing but love and a family. Psyche is very like Sansa, very feminine and naïve. She got isolated, married to a man she thinks is a monster but is not. Venus reacted like Cersei, she chose a girl who was completely innocent to level various charges against her–stealing her place, damaging her son, etc.– and is ridiculously unsuited for the tasks she assigns as punishments, and her obsessive pursuit of her, and her beating of the girl, is absurd, for all of the characters in the tale show compassion in varying degrees, not her.

Hmmm, I’m sorry, but this is quite creepy. She didn’t really come willingly did she? That is a lot like Tyrion’s “proposal” to Sansa, when she had already been told by Cersei that she would marry him one way or another. So what if Beauty said she was forced? Her father would die. So what if Sansa said she wouldn’t marry Tyrion? Either the king would force her, or she’d marry another Lannister. Choices!

Forgive me, but this bit seems to have come out rather hurriedly. Context. It’s better understood as the story unfolds.

Nice nod to the Cupid myth here.

More than just a nod. A retelling of Cupid coming in the night to visit her, only that he really came, though some very late interpretations say he came to Psyche in her dreams until the night she saw him.

Good write-up, Lady Lea. However, I found myself disagreeing with your analysis for the most part, the points addressed are only some of those we differ on. I'm off to reading Part 2...

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Finished reading Part 2. Milady thinks the important link between the scenes you’ve discussed is missing in your analysis, making it slightly fragmentary. Milady will wait for part 3 to see all pieces together :)

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Wonderful post Lyanna Stark! And what a brilliant commentary by other posters! Just a tiny nitpick, though. Tyrion and Sansa's last interaction before their marriage was just before he set out to command the city's defences before the Battle of Blackwater, I think, when he notices her standing in a courtyard waiting for Joffrey. I could be wrong, in which case... :blush:

n t

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