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Bad Hound!

GRRM Vocab

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Was "nuncle" ever a real word? I hate that word SOOOO much that whenever I read it I almost forget to flex my sword hand and want to tear my boiled leather off my back.

Yes, it's found in Shakespeare. It's an amalgam of "mine uncle".

The only two words I would think are of GRRM's creation are: Ser and Maester

Robert Jordan uses master when describing a scribe or one with expertise in alchemy.

Isn't "Ser" just "Sir" spelled differently? Like "teats" = tits.

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Can anyone please explain what exactly a "holdfast" is in the context of the books? Couldn't find an appropriate meaning for this one...


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Can anyone please explain what exactly a "holdfast" is in the context of the books? Couldn't find an appropriate meaning for this one...

Holdfast is a term invented by GRRM to describe the stronghold, or fortified home of a noble. Something bigger and more extensive than a simple Towerhouse but smaller than a castle.

It is reminiscent of the real world term Fastness for a stronghold, a realworld holdfast is a device to fasten things securely so it suggests a building that cements somebodies hold on the land.

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Holdfast is a term invented by GRRM to describe the stronghold, or fortified home of a noble. Something bigger and more extensive than a simple Towerhouse but smaller than a castle.

It is reminiscent of the real world term Fastness for a stronghold, a realworld holdfast is a device to fasten things securely so it suggests a building that cements somebodies hold on the land.

Ah, I see. Thanks for the info.

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What about Mummers?



A mummer was something along the lines of an actor in the middle ages. A Mummer's farce then is a play, comedy, or silly playacting. Bloody Mummers has a double meaning since in context they are a mismatched band of mercenaries.


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"Taking the Black". When I first heard that I pictured a thousand Johnny Cash's manning the wall. Ya.

As soon as I read this, I pictured Johnny Cash standing on the walling singing "I've Been Everywhere Man" with places of Westeros substituted in.

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These are all old English words that are no longer in common use. For instance, leal means to be faithful or loyal. So when you see "leal lords" it means lords who are loyal to a higher lord or king.

Also, "breaking one`s fast" was the original term for breakfast.

The only one on that list that is unique to ASOIAF is direwolf and possibly moon blood.

Oh, and host doesn`t mean army. A host is a person who welcomes another into his or her home and provides them with food, drink, a bed etc.

Basically, this. But breaking one's fast often occured much later in the day. It's not "Old" English, which is a totally different language to the one we use today (Shakespeare is not "Old" English, either - it really is another language). It's just old fashioned, archaic terms that existed and have fallen away in the intervening centuries. You can pick it up from looking at any online documents in the archives.

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I kept noticing in the first 2 books POVs saying or thinking "Would that I could." It's not a complicated phrase, but seen it dominantly only in this series.


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Despite knowing next to nothing about husbandry, he does get some horse terms correct



Palfrey- A smallish horse with smooth gaits, more comfortable for long distance riding than the latter two. Similar to Paso Finos, Icelandics and Fox Trotters.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palfrey



Garron- Colloquial term for a Scottish Highland pony. Bordering on horse size, it makes sense that if GRRM patterns the North on northern England, that the local equines would resemble Highlands.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garron



Destrier- Traditional warhorse or charger. Usually large but not heavy. In no way resembles a Clydesdale as Clydes weren't developed until the 1700s, even then as an AGRICULTURAL breed, not for war. Closest modern equivalents are Andalusians, Lusitanos, Friesians and some heavier strains of American Saddlebreds.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Destrier




*


"Would" is an holdover from the subjunctive tense which is rarely used properly in English any more, although it is still used in the Romance languages (Spanish, French, Italian, etc...) "Would that ..." is the closest modern approximation to it. Again, most casual speakers of English do not use it.



"Moon Blood" is used by a number of authors to indicate menstruation, esp. those who write in historical fiction or fantasy.


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