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brashcandy

From Pawn to Player: Rethinking Sansa XVII

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And I don't especially like Harry/Ginny - I was pulling for him to wind up with Luna.

All the best people felt the same... :)

I'm not a massive fan of Sansa/Sandor (just as I also didn't much like Ron/Hermione - I'm not sure the two characters would be particularly healthy for each other, at least at this point in their arcs) but I would never deny the huge amount of foreshadowing and the importance of their interactions for both characters' development. I'm interested to see how it will play out.

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OMG thank you KRBD. Now I know I am not the only who didn't like Harry with Ginny. On the other hand, I always knew that Ron and Hermione would get together because it was set up from the very beginning and built up as the story went along - just like with Sandor and Sansa. It's been there right from the very beginning.

And don't even get me started on the show giving all the best Hound lines to LF!! Gah! And not only that but what was the purpose of having Sansa save Dontos on the show if LF just blurts out to her in the end that he will help her?!! Anyway, the line that I think Silverin was thinking of is "Take a look around you, they're all liars here and every one better than you." It's what Sandor says to her when he walks Sansa back to her room after running into her on the Serpentine steps.

Lady Lea welcome back and congrats on 1000 posts Lord Bronn!

*throws up his hand in the hating of Harry/Ginny* Honestly, other than a small bit of me hoping for Harry/Hermonie after Ron said "fuck this shit" in the seventh book, I saw no reason Harry needed to hook up with anyone in the series (could just give him a random wife in the epilogue).

TV-Sandor did not seem much like book-Sandor to me, except in height. It's as if the TV show creators decided that the Sandor/Sansa relationship mattered so little that they could portray as little of it as possible. TV-Sansa is more chummy with TV-Shae, Seven Save Us.

Of course, the TV show creators have also been willing to mess up other characters and relationships - Robb/Talisa instead of the more credible Robb/Jeyne in the book; and Shae apparently really being in love with Tyrion. Then there's the out-of-the-blue comradeship of Tywin and Disguised Arya; which did work initially (due to two fine actors) but totally lost me when Tywin Lannister discussed his heir's childhood reading problems with a serving girl! :ack:

The "SanSan" relationship is bound to bother some people; I can see that on the board. I don't see it as a definite romantic future bond for the characters, not unless Sandor changes and grows up and loses the alcoholism, to say the very least and maybe not even then; but it's probably a lot for some readers to swallow - a bitter warrior who has killed a child (albeit on a queen's orders) having a romantic, quasi-sexual relationship with an 11-12-year-old girl? At least TV-Sansa is older. But Sansa has more abrasive, less positive relationships when she becomes entangled first with Tyrion and then Littlefinger...

I love the show. It's what brought me to the series. But I have to keep reminding myself to treat it as a separate art and not compare the two.

While it does a disservice to Sansa's story, I do understand. It was easy to make the Dany/Drogo relationship easy to take. Just age Dany up. But they can't do that to Sansa. And while SanSan is not directly romantic like Dany/Drogo, it does have a romantic undertone. So, I can understand them shying away from that.

Shae..... They are royally screwing up her character. First season, she was actually quite nasty. Maybe good enough as a camp follower, but didn't really seem believably charming enough to make Tyrion want to bring her to KL. Then in Season 2, she's the complete opposite and is totally in love with Tyrion. She just wants to run away with him so they can be happy. That is not Shae. It makes her actions in Season 4 (where his trial should take place) make no sense.

As for Talisa, I had no idea who that was until you said Robb. Utterly forgettable character. Written in so they could have a storyline for Robb in Season 2.

I enjoyed Arya/Tywin. It's definitely one of those things I have to remind myself to not compare the show with the source. But yeah, Arya lost some major points in her story.

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I think the possible future relationship between Sansa and Sandor won't actually be a romantic one. Despite what he said to Arya about wanting to take Sansa, I think he sees her more as somebody to be protected, he sees himself the innocent in her. With Sansa I think the non-kiss is just her way of projecting that Sandor (the non-knight) is the only person who's acted like the knight's in her songs towards her, and so she romantisises him.

In the end I think their relationship will be about protection and nurture and Sandor will take the place of a father figure for Sansa.

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I think the possible future relationship between Sansa and Sandor won't actually be a romantic one. Despite what he said to Arya about wanting to take Sansa, I think he sees her more as somebody to be protected, he sees himself the innocent in her. With Sansa I think the non-kiss is just her way of projecting that Sandor (the non-knight) is the only person who's acted like the knight's in her songs towards her, and so she romantisises him.

In the end I think their relationship will be about protection and nurture and Sandor will take the place of a father figure for Sansa.

Can we also say that Sandor by not kissing her, but wanting to do that, protected her from his own demons. Just like Martin wrote in Blackwater episode: No little bird, I won`t hurt you...

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Can we also say that Sandor by not kissing her, but wanting to do that, protected her from his own demons. Just like Martin wrote in Blackwater episode: No little bird, I won`t hurt you...

exactly, despite what he wanted he put Sansa's wellbeing and safety first, which says a lot in a land where men seem to be able to just take what they want. After all his brother raped the Crown Prince's wife, for no reason other than he wanted to. It shows a queer kind of honour for Sandor, showing the true man he is when so many knights lack the same honour.

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Congratulations to the PtP threads!

I think the possible future relationship between Sansa and Sandor won't actually be a romantic one. Despite what he said to Arya about wanting to take Sansa, I think he sees her more as somebody to be protected, he sees himself the innocent in her. With Sansa I think the non-kiss is just her way of projecting that Sandor (the non-knight) is the only person who's acted like the knight's in her songs towards her, and so she romantisises him.

In the end I think their relationship will be about protection and nurture and Sandor will take the place of a father figure for Sansa.

I don't think that is an accurate description of Sandor's feelings. We've analysed that in the past. You can read some of the analyses here and here.

[thread police]

While it is completely understandable that not everyone can read all the old threads (after all, there are lots and lots) Brashcandy has helpfully linked the resources in the first post of the thread (as she has done for a couple of threads now) and it is worth taking the time to go through some of the analysis sections written, since it forms a good basis of in depth understanding Sansa's storyline.

A reminder as well: discussion about the show should really take place in the TV show forum and not in the book forums and too much commentary on the TV show risks getting the thread locked or moved. So please be mindful of this when commenting on the show to keep it in relation to the novels to avoid Mods coming in with the Mod hammer. :) [/thread police]

Also, due to its nature, the books are the "canon" source (with risk of sounding like a dull old professor) and although it is understandable that the information from the show will "bleed" into the interpretation of the books, it's useful to remember that the show is an interpretation of the books, and that how for instance Sansa and Arya are described in the show is quite far from how they are described in the novels. Rapsie commented earlier I believe on how shocking Arya's ACOK story line has been butchered if you read the novels closely and compare them to the show, and Sansa's arc has received a similar "neatification" for the TV public as Arya's (although perhaps less severe).

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I love when you're in old professor mode, Lyanna :P And yes, the resources are really recommended to get a solid idea of the nature of Sansa's relationships with some characters and just for general insight. Although we welcome continuing analyses, a starting point that appreciates the textual evidence and foreshadowing is necessary. Sandor does not indeed have "fatherly" feelings toward Sansa, even though he wants to protect her, and in his rough way, attempted to "guide" her through the snakepit of KL.

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Congratulations to the PtP threads! I don't think that is an accurate description of Sandor's feelings. We've analysied that in the past. You can read some of the analyses here and here.

Thank you for the links, I'm not doubting that there is a sexual attraction there for Sandor, just that in the end its not going to be a sexual/romantic relationship because he does put her first no matter what, he didn't kiss her, didn't rape her and didn't kidnap her, and he could easily have done all of that. In my opinion Sansa's romantisised view of Sandor is linked to how he was the only person in KL who didn't mollicoddle her and told her the truth, so she wants to hold on to that. If there is a relationship there then it is as a doomed one.

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Did Lady's death pay for Bran's life?

It came up here in the "Wow, I never noticed that." thread" and I've been wondering about the implications.

MMD tells Dany "Only death may pay for life" and that sentiment is echoed by Jaquen to Arya when she is offered her three deaths. The timing of Bran's awakening certainly fits with Lady's death. What he sees of Ned, Arya, and Sansa in his visions seems to be the moments before Ned chooses to kill Lady himself. There isn't any immediately apparent medical reason for Bran to awaken then as opposed to earlier or later. Bloodraven specifically tells him to put Jaime pushing him out of his mind so there isn't an urgency to get Bran to awaken to help with the fate of his family with the current political intrigue either.

I'm thinking Bran was warged into Summer in a psuedo second life and Lady's death is the sacrifice that pays for his return to his own body and "resurrection." There seemed to be a connection that was keeping his body alive as Cat notes that Bran grew weaker when the window was closed to block out the wolf's howling. My first thoughts on this are about Jon's potential recovery from his stabbing. Borroq, the boar warg that calls him brother, has taken to living in Castle Black's lichyard (the same place at Winterfell Lady is buried) which always struck me as important. While interesting to speculate on, the Bran/Sansa connection from a sacrifice of Lady's life probably has far more subtle clues and implications beyond a single cliff hanging event.

Here's the passage where we learn Lady is buried in the lichyard.

“And she says nothing of Arya, nothing, not so much as a word. Damn her! What’s wrong with the girl?”

Bran felt all cold inside. “She lost her wolf,” he said, weakly, remembering the day when four of his father’s guardsmen had returned from the south with Lady’s bones. Summer and Grey Wind and Shaggydog had begun to howl before they crossed the drawbridge, in voices drawn and desolate. Beneath the shadow of the First Keep was an ancient lichyard, its headstones spotted with pale lichen, where the old Kings of Winter had laid their faithful servants. It was there they buried Lady, while her brothers stalked between the graves like restless shadows. She had gone south, and only her bones had returned.

Bran's reaction of feeling cold and speaking weakly is odd especially compared to Robb's anger and frustration. That he notes the connection to Sansa losing her wolf in what is clearly a Lannister forced letter stands out too. I had been wondering about the connection between Sansa's dreams with Lady and Bloodraven, but now I'm considering the possibility that they may be connected to Bran instead. That distinction between Bran and Bloodraven becomes less clear after he reaches the CotF cave.

Brash pulled out these references:

AGOT: She had been dreaming, she realized. Lady was with her, and they were running together, and ... and ... trying to remember was like trying to catch the rain with her fingers. The dream faded, and Lady was dead again.

ACOK: Sansa backed away from the window, retreating toward the safety of her bed. I'll go to sleep, she told herself, and when I wake it will be a new day, and the sky will be blue again. The fighting will be done and someone will tell me whether I'm to live or die. "Lady," she whimpered softly, wondering if she would meet her wolf again when she was dead.

Then something stirred behind her, and a hand reached out of the dark and grabbed her wrist.

ASOS: That was such a sweet dream, Sansa thought drowsily. She had been back in Winterfell, running through the godswood with her Lady. Her father had been there, and her brothers, all of them warm and safe. If only dreaming could make it so ...

ASOS: That night Sansa scarcely slept at all, but tossed and turned just as she had aboard the Merling King. She dreamt of Joffrey dying, but as he clawed at his throat and the blood ran down across his fingers she saw with horror that it was her brother Robb. And she dreamed of her wedding night too, of Tyrion's eyes devouring her as she undressed. Only then he was bigger than Tyrion had any right to be, and when he climbed into bed his face was scarred only on one side. "I'll have a song from you," he rasped, and Sansa woke and found the old blind dog beside her once again. "I wish that you were Lady," she said.

AFFC: ... All around the air was empty air and sky, the ground falling away sharply to either side. There was ice under foot, and broken stones just waiting to turn an ankle, and the wind was howling fiercely. It sounds like a wolf, thought Sansa. A ghost wolf, big as mountains.

What is Bran doing while Sansa has these dreams?

The first he's in Winterfell with Robb probably learning to ride Dancer or possibly it might be right after the Osha meeting. Hard to put an exact time on it.

The second seems to be during Theon's occupation of Winterfell. Maybe while Bran is hiding in the crypts.

The two SoS dreams are hard to place. The last Bran chapter is the Nightfort and it occurs before either of Sansa's dreams but that doesn't mean the timeline works out that way. Bran has happy moments during Meera's KotLT story and with the Liddle in the cave. Scary moments in the tower when he sees Jon through Summer and in the Nightfort. I don't see strong connections but I haven't really done an exhaustive compare.

For Feast Bran is already at the cave with Bloodraven. The Ghost Wolf wind howl might match up with Jon's stabbing and, especially with Osha's wind comment, has all kinds of Bran possibilities.

Maybe making a distinction between Sansa's dreams with Lady and her waking thoughts and wishes about Lady might be more helpful?

Tze had this observation about Snow Winterfell and Bran which has always made me wonder (because it seems so very true.)

Sansa's losing time here. I don't think it's a coincidence that, immediately after she "blacks out" in the godswood, she starts building an incredibly detailed scale model of Winterfell. The Stark that knew Winterfell's geography best was Bran, certainly not Sansa. What was going on during Sansa's lost time here? Was she, perhaps, communicating with Bran in the godswood? Could that be why Sansa's first instinct upon "waking up" from her trance was to start building a model of Winterfell filled with the type of details we know for a fact Bran knew (but which seem like the sort of things Sansa wasn't really paying attention to when she was living there)?

<snip>

In a semi-related thought there is MMD's resurrection of Drogo that has me wondering too. Someone had a thread about her dagger and whether it being bronze and the ancient glyphs connected it to the First Men.

Mirri Maz Duur chanted words in a tongue that Dany did not know, and a knife appeared in her hand. Dany never saw where it came from. It looked old; hammered red bronze, leaf-shaped, its blade covered with ancient glyphs.

“Strength of the mount, go into the rider,” Mirri sang as horse blood swirled into the waters of Drogo’s bath. “Strength of the beast, go into the man.”

She glimpsed the shadow of a great wolf, and another like a man wreathed in flames.

Her lines about the strength of the beast going into the man strikes me as somewhat warg-like. The great wolf shadow in the tent stands out too and I've never been sure what to make of it. Is this an old gods resurrection that fails because Drogo isn't a warg? In Bran's vision he seems to have a choice to wake or not-- to live or die. Why did Drogo come back a blank? Did Drogo choose not to live? Did MMD intentionally fail to guide him the way Bloodraven guides Bran? If it is old gods resurrection I would be inclined to go with Drogo not being a warg. Is there anything here that sheds light on a Bran/Lady/Sansa connection?

We discussed the Bran/Sansa parallels earlier. Is there anything there that might prove fruitful? Also since Sandor is in many ways a Lady replacement what are the parallels and contrasts between Bran and Sandor? Knighthood jumps out as one example and Bran's discussion about lack of knights in the North with Luwin in particular.

As a final random note Brash has been interested in Bronze Yohn's armor. Lummel rained on our magic connection parade (damn him and his English weather :tantrum: ), but he very well could be right. Sam also comments to Jon about the First Men history being written Maesters because the First Men only wrote in runes (since their history was recorded in the weirwoods.) Could the runes on the armor be a story or a song? Possibly the original First Men telling of one of Sansa's favorite stories dating back before the Andals in its original version?

Gratz on the anniversary!!! :cheers:

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Ragnorak,

That's a fantastic comprehensive analysis. It seems there are definitely links between Bran - Sansa - Jon that are not apparent at first since the Ayra - Jon connection is so strong. It's interesting how GRRM handles the "low magic" setting and the Stark children's warg magic capabilities. They are so subtly described as to be almost invisible sometimes, but laid out like this I think a case can definitely be made.

Thank you for the links, I'm not doubting that there is a sexual attraction there for Sandor, just that in the end its not going to be a sexual/romantic relationship because he does put her first no matter what, he didn't kiss her, didn't rape her and didn't kidnap her, and he could easily have done all of that. In my opinion Sansa's romantisised view of Sandor is linked to how he was the only person in KL who didn't mollicoddle her and told her the truth, so she wants to hold on to that. If there is a relationship there then it is as a doomed one.

That he puts her first is not necessarily something that will be what prevents them from having a relationship. As can be deduced from Sansa's arc is that she's disillusioned with arranged marriages, she has realised that she is a "piece of meat as Winterfell's heir, and she wishes to be loved for herself. In that way, it's very much a Bildungsroman (to borrow one of Lummel's favourite expressions!) about Sansa's growth as a character and her quest for agency. By being through what she has, she has been forced to realise that as a noble woman, what she once held as the road to happiness (marrying a prince in an arranged match) is actually a gilded cage. She's seen the ugly backside of how women in Westeros lack power, agency and the rights over their own bodies. They are a pretty face with a dowry attached, to be "ridden like horses" and discarded. She now knows that the outside is not necessarily a match of what is inside (i.e. a good looking person is not necessarily "good" per se.)

Now, as we have seen, for all his barking, crudeness and foul moods, Sandor is still so far the only man who is interested in Sansa_the_person, not in her status, her possible wealth or her claim to Winterfell. He's also not a pretty boy. Hence the logical conclusion of this is that we can draw a line to what Sansa needed to learn (as stated above) and their interactions.

That said, "romance" as brashcandy and I are rather fond of pointing out, does not mean live happily every after with puppies, kids and a white picket fence like in Hollywood RomComs, but it means passion, sturm und drang, strong feelings. And this is what we have here, developing on the pages. Sandor's feelings for Sansa, judging by the Serpentine Steps scene and how he keeps going on about Sansa to Arya are definitely not only fatherly or brotherly, and Sansa is developing feelings of her own that are definitely no longer centered on Sandor as protector, evidenced by her dream in ASOS combined with her thoughts on kissing Sweetrobin and during her ride down from the Eyrie with Myranda Royce.

So, sure, it may not ever be realised, but in that the affection seems to be mutual, it seems that Sandor/Sansa is setup in a very similar way to Brienne/Jaime, and I'd be very surprised if that doesn't have some sort of conclusion at least. Whether it be by someone's death (on the page) or some sort of completion of their relationship (either a decision to never be together, a short romance, or even the ending Hollywood style, only of course, this is ASOIAF so no white picket fences). What I think is that it is likely that something will come off these two relationships, since they've been built up and constructed since AGOT (Sansa/Sandor) and ACOK/ASOS (Jaime/Brienne).

As these two relationship are constructed as romances, it seems odd to then draw the conclusion that because they are, nothing will come of it. On the contrary, it seems because they are *something should* come out of it. the author has made a choice to insert these themes for a reason, even if it is subtle enough that a lot of people miss it even after more than one reread (although some catch it on the first. My SO caught it faster than I did, bless his heart. He thought I was a slow poke for not really noticing properly until I got to ASOS the first time.)

And you know, sometimes the "obvious" things come true, like Tyrion going to meet Dany (often called ever since ASOS in 2001). I imagine that Jon being Lyanna's and Rhaegar's and that Jon won't die are other "badly kept secrets" that will also come true. :)

EDIT: Oh, just realised, I can't find the link to Lord Bronn's excellent write up of Sandor as a male character who has influenced Sansa.

EDIT 2: Found the links here!

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Lyanna Stark's very good points

I certainly don't think we'll be seeing any Lady Clegane at any point. They both feel strongly for each other, but as I mentioned above, I believe that the reason behind this is because of what they represent to each other. For that reason I don't see them forming a physical relationship, just a mental/emotional one (and that won't stop Sansa being with someone else, nor Sandor really but that seems less likely). Also I don't think they'd necessarily have to be physically in the same place to have this mental/emotional connection, each represents good to the other, and so give strength to one another.

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I certainly don't think we'll be seeing any Lady Clegane at any point. They both feel strongly for each other, but as I mentioned above, I believe that the reason behind this is because of what they represent to each other.

What do they represent to each other though? Based on the textual analysis of the Serpentine Steps scene, the Red Keep rooftop scene, the Battle of the Blackwater and the bloody cloak kept and Sandor's time with Arya; and Sansa's thoughts on Sandor in the Vale, it's hard to ignore the sexual connotations added. The "protector only" angle is reinforced in the show, but there are further layers in the novels that are not there in the show.

Lord Bronn has made some very good points on it here and also here, for instance.

So while it is possible that it ends up a platonic relationship forever, the characters' own thoughts and the foreshadowing seem to point in a different direction. (Also, as noted, "romance" does not equal "marriage" necessarily.) If you feel there are foreshadowing or passages in the text that contradict it, then that could be a valid point of discussion, too.

EDIT: I'm well aware that there are several objections to this relationship. They can often be condensed into "he's too old/Sansa is too young" or variants thereof, or that "he's no good for her", which are of course things people can think, but if that sort of personal value statements are put aside and only the text is looked at, the above is the picture that emerges. (I might also add here that the age difference between Sansa and Sandor is almost exactly the same as the age difference between Brienne and Jaime, just for reference. The ASOIAF Wiki has the timeline.)

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What do they represent to each other though? Based on the textual analysis of the Serpentine Steps scene, the Red Keep rooftop scene, the Battle of the Blackwater and the bloody cloak kept and Sandor's time with Arya; and Sansa's thoughts on Sandor in the Vale, it's hard to ignore the sexual connotations added. The "protector only" angle is reinforced in the show, but there are further layers in the novels that are not there in the show.

Age doesn't really come into it, if I found it that creepy I would just edit their ages in my imagination so I could deal with it.

I think that to Sansa, Sandor represents strength and honesty (the latter being a rare quality in KL) and all a knight should be, so he's representing that while all men aren't knights that isn't exactly a bad thing.

To Sandor, Sansa is innocence and purity, despite all that happens to her she still dreams, a trait that Sandor (probably) lost long long ago.

I'm not saying there is no sexual tension there, because there is, but I think that is more because each of them is drawn to the qualities the other possesses, when there is a lack of other people with those around. After all, how many people are honest in KL? Or innocent?

I don't mean strength in a protector way, more an inspiration for Sansa to find her inner strength.

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I think that to Sansa, Sandor represents strength and honesty (the latter being a rare quality in KL) and all a knight should be, so he's representing that while all men aren't knights that isn't exactly a bad thing.

To Sandor, Sansa is innocence and purity, despite all that happens to her she still dreams, a trait that Sandor (probably) lost long long ago.

Do you have anything in the text you can refer to to back that up?

Not trying to be difficult, but this is a more serious analysis thread, so to think things and have theories are fine, but it's a useful thing to be able to back those up with some textual evidence to support the points made.

Why do you think he only represents those things, and not the more romantic or sexual connotations? Is there anything in the text that indicates this, specifically?

As for Sandor having lost his dreams, a case can be made for him as of ASOS having regained his capability to "dream" if anything, due to him considering joining with Robb, so what, specifically, makes you think the opposite?

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EDIT: Oh, just realised, I can't find the link to Lord Bronn's excellent write up of Sandor as a male character who has influenced Sansa.

EDIT 2: Found the links here!

I'm planning to eventually create a separate resource post for those male analyses. Just wanted everyone to get in their remaining parts, and then it'll be done :)

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Do you have anything in the text you can refer to to back that up?

Not trying to be difficult, but this is a more serious analysis thread, so to think things and have theories are fine, but it's a useful thing to be able to back those up with some textual evidence to support the points made.

Why do you think he only represents those things, and not the more romantic or sexual connotations? Is there anything in the text that indicates this, specifically?

As for Sandor having lost his dreams, a case can be made for him as of ASOS having regained his capability to "dream" if anything, due to him considering joining with Robb, so what, specifically, makes you think the opposite?

The reason I don't think Sansa's thoughts on Sandor are sexual is because of how unsexual Sansa herself is, she never thinks of anything more than the kiss happening, or imagine if it did. In her POV chapter about her wedding she notes that the bedding had once filled her with bawdy excitement, but no longer, and when she doesn't actively wish for someone else in her bed. Similarly she is made particularly distressed, to the point of semi-warging (the connection with the dog) at Marillion's suggestions.

So its not that there isn't the possibility for there to be a sexual relationship, more Sansa's seeming lack of sexuality or wanting sex.

Just because Sandor is able to dream again doesn't mean that he didn't lose the ability before, plus this is after he left KL and Sansa behind, meaning that she already made her impression on him. The Little Bird comments and the advice to save her from Joffrey is what makes me say that he sees her as innocent and pure, plus the fact that he appears not to ever lie to her, and saves her in the riots.

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The reason I don't think Sansa's thoughts on Sandor are sexual is because of how unsexual Sansa herself is, she never thinks of anything more than the kiss happening, or imagine if it did. In her POV chapter about her wedding she notes that the bedding had once filled her with bawdy excitement, but no longer, and when she doesn't actively wish for someone else in her bed. Similarly she is made particularly distressed, to the point of semi-warging (the connection with the dog) at Marillion's suggestions.

With regard to Tyrion and Marillion, it would be hard for her to find those incidents in any way appealing, considering that they were attempting to rape her. Sansa does demonstrate, however, a very natural sexual development as she gets older. One example would be her thoughts of Loras Tyrell in ASOS:

She could only imagine what it would be like to pull up his tunic and caress the smooth skin underneath, to stand on her toes and kiss him, to run her fingers through those thick brown curls and drown in his deep brown eyes. A flush crept up her neck.

And she does think of more than the kiss happening with Sandor. Lyanna Stark has spoken about the fact that in her dream at the Fingers, Sandor would have been naked when climbing into bed with her.

So its not that there isn't the possibility for there to be a sexual relationship, more Sansa's seeming lack of sexuality or wanting sex.

Again, when you consider her thoughts about Loras, the erotic dream about Sandor, even her eventual plans to have children with Willas, it's not possible to characterize Sansa as uninterested in sex/sexuality.

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And she does think of more than the kiss happening with Sandor. Lyanna Stark has spoken about the fact that in her dream at the Fingers, Sandor would have been naked when climbing into bed with her.

Can you elaborate on this? I didn't pick up on it, or have forgotten. :)

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Can you elaborate on this? I didn't pick up on it, or have forgotten. :)

Sure; remember that Sandor takes the place of Tyrion in this dream, so when we recall the events of the original scene, Tyrion climbs into bed naked with Sansa. Therefore, it stands to reason that Sandor himself is also undressed, and even more importantly, Sansa is looking at him as he climbs into the bed, which suggests that this is not a frightening experience for her.

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