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Publication Date confirmed for Scott Lynch’s THE REPUBLIC OF THIEVES


AncalagonTheBlack

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I thought the B&N thing was odd so I did some checking online for stores in various zip codes. Most stores have RoT, but there's the odd one or two that don't. And some of those are ones you wouldn't expect to not to have it. Maybe some went entirely to pre-orders or there were some hiccups with ordering, or maybe there was indeed a screw-up by Del Rey.

I traveled to Albuquerque today and visited the B&N on Menaul (the B&N is just down the street from the Breaking Bad carwash, btw) -- no sign of Republic of Thieves. It may be the Lynch fans in the SW cleaned it out, but I didn't see a copy in the new releases section or the new fantasy releases section.

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In what context? When referring to levels of a building, 'storeys' is correct (in English, anyway, but not American-English). Obviously when referring to fictional tales, that would be incorrect.

Sabetha about young Locke: "He makes up storeys, you see."

It's meant in the fictional tale context, but as currently spelt implies that Lamora specialises in high-rise buildings.

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Sabetha about young Locke: "He makes up storeys, you see."

It's meant in the fictional tale context, but as currently spelt implies that Lamora specialises in high-rise buildings.

I did a quick search for 'storeys' in my ebook edition and came up with nothing.Since i have the US edition i'm guessing the problem is in the UK edition.

From my ebook -

“He’s a total idiot,” Sabetha whispered, squeezing the constable’s free hand. “It’s just not safe for him to be out without an escort! He makes up stories, you see.

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That's pretty funny. I think I can guess how this happened. The author is from Minnesota/Wisconsin so the original book is written in American English. To convert it to UK English, they must go through it and change every instance of "color" to "colour" and so on. Somebody probably decided that "stories" should become "storeys" and forgot that the word has multiple meanings. BTW, is "storeys" the preferred plural of "story" in the sense of levels of a building in the UK? In the US, we use "stories" as the plural for both senses of the work.


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is "storeys" the preferred plural of "story" in the sense of levels of a building in the UK?

Yes. It's the only spelling. Until this thread I'd never seen 'stories' used to refer to levels of a building in my entire life.

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In what context? When referring to levels of a building, 'storeys' is correct (in English, anyway, but not American-English). Obviously when referring to fictional tales, that would be incorrect.

A multi-storey car-park would be a lot more fun if that was the UK spelling of "stories" :)

Does anyone know if the physical UK copy has the same error?

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The storey thing is appalling. Surely more than one person read the book before publication? It's driving me insane.



Anyway, I'm about half way through and still waiting eagerly for a single reason that Locke would care about Sabetha in the slightest. She's one of the most onjectionable fictional characters I've ever read.


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Never seen a Lynch interview before. I'm very impressed with how articulate he spoke. Hopefully they'll be more.

And really guys, it's only one error. Move on and forget about it. :P

It's one error that occurs twelve times, which makes it twelve times as annoying. :P

(I just did a search on the Kindle. 25 instances of "storey", but 13 of them are the correct meaning)

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It's one error that occurs twelve times, which makes it twelve times as annoying. :P

(I just did a search on the Kindle. 25 instances of "storey", but 13 of them are the correct meaning)

I rarely pick up on mistakes to be honest because usually I'm too engaged with the text. But now I'm going to see it and become annoyed because I'll be looking for it. :P

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Frank,

"Articulately". "Articulate" is an adjective. When you are describing how someone spoke it needs to be an adverb and thus an "ly" should be attached.

Wow... Erm, thanks for pulling me up on a quickly typed message just before I ran out to drop my car off at the mechanics for an MOT... I guess.

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