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Publication Date confirmed for Scott Lynch’s THE REPUBLIC OF THIEVES


AncalagonTheBlack

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Were there really people questioning this? After practically the entire crew got wiped out in LoLL, I pretty much figured that Locke and Jean would persist throughout as "The Gentleman Bastards." :dunno:

I wouldn't put it past Lynch to make Jean the Gentleman Bastard (singular, apparently) in the series title, but I doubt it.

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Tbf I think the title of book 4 answered that question already.

While the implication is that locke is still in book 4 there isn't anything from the "thorn of emberlain" (anyone could take up the mantle) or the interview (i'd be surprised if he'd really let that out of the bag). As long as there is a good way of Locke getting out of his predicament, I'll be happy to see him and Jean have their further adventures though.

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While the implication is that locke is still in book 4 there isn't anything from the "thorn of emberlain" (anyone could take up the mantle) or the interview (i'd be surprised if he'd really let that out of the bag). As long as there is a good way of Locke getting out of his predicament, I'll be happy to see him and Jean have their further adventures though.

It's a bit like Flashman in that respect: you know the character will pull through in the end, but that doesn't detract from the fun.

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Keep in mind that the original genesis for the series (you have to go back and read his old Live Journal entries from the big "read along" last year) was that Locke was a criminal mastermind turned spymaster in Emberlain who (centuries later, through the framing device of scholarly histories) is nothing more than a footnote who's existence is doubted by said future historians. As Lynch has pointed out, he originally tried to write from that point, but found that there was too much he had to tell in flashbacks so he abandoned the idea and wrote the past instead. He's been very honest that the situation in the Seven Marrows is the central issue that will (eventually) drive the series towards it's resolution...and that this is something that really only comes into the foreground in Book 4. How much of that concept still survives is something only Lynch would know, of course, but it would make sense with what we've been given so-far.

That's not to say that his fate is set in stone to survive the entire series, but it seems clear that Locke himself is the gordian knot of the series, being slowly worked out and moved along. We're dealing with kocky twentysomethings now, and we've seen in the first two novels that Locke has a bad habit of opening his mouth at the wrong times or coming up with things that (somewhat recklessly) emperil or even kill his friends.

The character I would worry about more is Jean. Maybe not in this book...but...I could see Lynch choosing to remove Jean from the board to allow a more "unhinged/out of control" Locke. Not that I'm predicting it, mind - I wouldn't lay money on this. Just that I could see it.

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Tweeted by Gollancz/Simon Spanton:

So the new @scottlynch78 novel. I pretty much screeched in horror at the end. For the avoidance of doubt; Lynch is an evil, evil man.

Hmm :)

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Kip in Brent Weeks Lightbringer series is a fat character, and quite brave and does a lot. He also gets shit done: also, while he gets a ton more muscle in the second book, he is apparently still quite fat, and seems to never be able to lose his weight. His weight also actually comes in handy a few times.

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Really? Did he man up in A Dance with Dragons, because I remember him being a coward/whinging about everything through the first four books.

This. Sam is a total coward, but he finds strength through his brothers - just one reason he is awesome /threadjack

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The Republic of Thieves is 210,000 words, or every so slightly longer than The Lies of Locke Lamora (190,000 words, or thereabouts). Probably 550-600 pages in hardcover/tradeback. Those hoping for a monster of a book are to be disappointed.

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