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Angalin

Small questions v.10010

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Should I assume all books in the series are at least somewhat accurate unlike the books written in our universe like the works of aristotle or the history written by Herodotus?

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Should I assume all books in the series are at least somewhat accurate unlike the books written in our universe like the works of aristotle or the history written by Herodotus?

GRRM seems to be very aware that books in the series can and realistically should contain mistakes (sometimes wild ones) and has his characters remark on that in-universe. So while on average the history and geography books within the books will probably be more accurate than they'd be under similar conditions irl, I would be very careful not to lend them too much credence.

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chuck norris 42, no you should not assume that all books inside the story are accurate. I think it´s similar to our world.

Tyrion grinned. “Ser Byron Swann. He was roasted for his trouble … only the dragon was Syrax, not Vhagar.”

“I fear that you’re mistaken. In The Dance of the Dragons, A True Telling, Maester Munkun writes—”

“—that it was Vhagar. Grand Maester Munkun errs. Ser Byron’s squire saw his master die, and wrote his daughter of the manner of it. His account says it was Syrax, Rhaenyra’s she-dragon, which makes more sense than Munken’s version. Swann was the son of a marcher lord, and Storm’s End was for Aegon. Vhagar was ridden by Prince Aemond, Aegon’s brother. Why should Swann want to slay her?”

and

“How did all this begin, between Blackwood and Bracken? Is it written down?”

“It is, my lord,” the boy said, “but some of the histories were penned by their maesters and some by ours, centuries after the events that they purport to chronicle.

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Are you talking about Bronn's "Give me ten good men and some climbing spikes. I'll impregnate the bitch"? I think that was show only. Book Bronn doesn't make empty boasts he couldn't follow through with, no matter how bad ass they would sound.

Yes that one! Thank you.

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Crown

Lord Paramount

Lord

Landed Knights

Knights

Clergy(Septons)

Merchants

Hedge Knights

Men at Arms and Free Riders

Serfs

Common Folk

This is the social order right? or am I missing something?

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Free riders are almost equal to the hedge knights, their only difference being the vows the Knights take. And with the new Faith Militant, the High Septon could be almost equal to the lords, or at least Landed Knights. Merchants would be below freeriders and men at arms since the warrior class is always above the other classes in the feudal society. I also believe the Lord Commanders of certain organizations(City watch, Kingsguard) would be higher then Clergy or the Landed Knights, respectively.

(Note: Reputaiton wise, probably any Kingsguard would be higher than a landed knight. However, the thing that determines power in a feudal society is land, so a landed Knight may be higher in feudal hierarchy.)

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Why did Mel want to make a shadow baby with Davos way back in Davos III of Storm? That was while Davos was still locked up but after the started being nice to him. It was before the leeches and way before they received word of Mance's army at the Wall.

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I was reading the wiki and it said White Harbour is one of the five cities of Westeros. I imagine King's Landing and Oldtown are on that list as well. What are the other two? Lannisport and Gulltown?

Surely there are more cities than this right? Doesn't Areo Hotah refer to Sunspear as a city, although he also says its pathetic compared to Essos cities.

This is the social order right? or am I missing something?

In like 9th grade social studies they tell you all those social orders that all the different societies had, but that stuff is never set in stone. A random knight would be held in higher prestige than a random merchant, but a very wealthy merchant would be higher than a random knight. In general this stuff isnt very clear cut. Common folk would be higher than serfs i think, because common folk are free but serfs arent really.

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Crown

Lord Paramount

Lord

Landed Knights

Knights

Clergy(Septons)

Merchants

Hedge Knights

Men at Arms and Free Riders

Serfs

Common Folk

This is the social order right? or am I missing something?

More or less, but there are no serfs in Westeros, unless I've missed something huge?

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Crown

Lord Paramount

Lord

Landed Knights

Knights

Clergy(Septons)

Merchants

Hedge Knights

Men at Arms and Free Riders

Serfs

Common Folk

This is the social order right? or am I missing something?

Just add Bloodraven above crown and you nailed it. :)

On a serious note I think that's correct all but the Serfs, as Lady Gwynhyfvar pointed out, though maybe there are we just don't know enough details yet. Or would Thralls fall into that category?

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Just add Bloodraven above crown and you nailed it. :)

On a serious note I think that's correct all but the Serfs, as Lady Gwynhyfvar pointed out, though maybe there are we just don't know enough details yet. Or would Thralls fall into that category?

I think thralls are lower than serfs (more like outright slaves, tied to a master rather than a manor) but they only seem to exist in the Iron Islands, which I don't think is representative of Westeros as a whole. In fact, they are probably more comparable to Denmark and especially Iceland, which both maintained some type of serfdom well beyond most of the rest of Western Europe.

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How do the Braavosi count days differently than they do in Westeros?

Arya references that as reason for why she might have missed her birthday, i.e. this is about counting the date within a year.

As we see from the sample excerpt of "The Princess and the Queen", in Westeros, the days of the year are numbered as

xth day of the yth moon of the year

Here it is not certain whether the year starts with the 1st day of the 1st moon, or whether if the moon has already started when the year begins, it may also start with a higher number. The "moons" used in the dates might even be completely disconnected from the actual moon phases like our months.

In any case though, the Westerosi calender gives the sun precedence over the moon, just like our Western calender.

Considering that Braavos was founded by the Moonsingers (and theirs is still the greatest temple), it is plausible that their calender might be more moon based than sun based like the Westerosi (and our Western calender).

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Arya references that as reason for why she might have missed her birthday, i.e. this is about counting the date within a year.

As we see from the sample excerpt of "The Princess and the Queen", in Westeros, the days of the year are numbered as

xth day of the yth moon of the year

Here it is not certain whether the year starts with the 1st day of the 1st moon, or whether if the moon has already started when the year begins, it may also start with a higher number. The "moons" used in the dates might even be completely disconnected from the actual moon phases like our months.

In any case though, the Westerosi calender gives the sun precedence over the moon, just like our Western calender.

Considering that Braavos was founded by the Moonsingers (and theirs is still the greatest temple), it is plausible that their calender might be more moon based than sun based like the Westerosi (and our Western calender).

Makes sense, thanks. That was exactly the passage I was wondering about.

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More or less, but there are no serfs in Westeros, unless I've missed something huge?

Just add Bloodraven above crown and you nailed it. :)

On a serious note I think that's correct all but the Serfs, as Lady Gwynhyfvar pointed out, though maybe there are we just don't know enough details yet. Or would Thralls fall into that category?

Yeah I was thinking thralls from the Iron Islands,but they can raise through the ranks apparently so,That's why I put them above the Common Folk.

Bloodraven and Bran are in a completely different dimension.

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