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What are you reading in August ?


AncalagonTheBlack

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I finished Cold Fire by Kate Elliott, which was infuriating. Cat was an awesome first person narrator, and it ended strong, but two thirds of the book was a confusing mess in which I didn't really know why I was reading it. Good enough that I will read the final volume though, Cat and Bee are both two awesome.

Flying through Gideon Smith and the Mechanical Girl, which so far is a fun little steampunk tale. Halfway through so far.

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A few days ago I finished River of Stars by Guy Gavriel Kay. I loved how beautiful and lyrical the language was, the book felt very poignant and was an absolute delight to read. I loved it, not quite as much as Under Heaven which was almost perfect for me, but well enough to call it a book that must be read if you love historical fiction. Like UH, it made me read up on Chinese history a bit after I was done. I only wish I had more time for it. I wish I had more time for things in general, had I been allowed to post my thoughts on this book shortly after I got done instead of a full week later I'd have a lot more to say. Sadly, the Spawn frown upon me actually typing on the computer without their help, even this post is written with one of them in my lap banging away at the keyboard while the other one is trying to climb up. *sigh*

I made quick work of Kim Harrison's The Good, the Bad and the Undead. It's the second in the series and was really enjoyable. I've read a lot of urban fantasy, I'm planning on picking up the rest eventually.

I'm now more than halfway through Spin by Robert Charles Wilson. Good book so far.

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On Sunday I finished Kill City Blues by Richard Kadrey, the fifth Sandman Slim book. I swear I had seen this billed as the final volume several places, but that's definitely not the case. I loved this book. It was a fun and thrilling ride, if a bit clichéd. The ragtag group of heroes has to go into the the dark and foreboding labyrinth to find the magical weapon. Kadrey's unique spin definitely made it feel fresh, and I can't wait to read more.

Having very little time to read since then, I've barely cracked Broken Homes by Ben Aaronovitch, but I'm really looking forward to getting into the meat of it.

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Absolutely flew through Echo, the second book in the Species Intervention series. Read it in two sittings today. 4/5 stars, as it wasn't quite as strong as Baby, but there are plenty more books in the series to help wrap up everything left dangling in Echo.

Also started Savage by Richard Laymon. A really interesting concept, and I enjoy Laymon's work, so a good read so far.

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First, I finished the latest Aaronovitch, Broken Homes. I think I didn't like it quite as much as the rest of the books, but then I absolutely loved the first three and rated them very, very highly. It was still very good and the ending was great.

After that I read Babayaga by Toby Barlow, author of Sharp Teeth. The book is about witches, spies, cops, and one very hapless, clueless analyst in 1959 Paris. One of the strengths of Sharp Teeth was the free verse that made for a very unique, interesting read. Babayaga is more straightforward, but much more wacky with oddball characters popping up all over in this madcap literary adventure. It's eminently readable, but for some reason it failed to completely grab me. I have to give it a lot of props for what the author was doing with it though.

Now I'm going to try The Days of the Deer by Liliana Bodoc.

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After that I read Babayaga by Toby Barlow, author of Sharp Teeth. The book is about witches, spies, cops, and one very hapless, clueless analyst in 1959 Paris. One of the strengths of Sharp Teeth was the free verse that made for a very unique, interesting read. Babayaga is more straightforward, but much more wacky with oddball characters popping up all over in this madcap literary adventure. It's eminently readable, but for some reason it failed to completely grab me. I have to give it a lot of props for what the author was doing with it though.

I had not heard that he had a new one. Thanks for bringing it to my attention, Ben! :thumbsup:

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Two book already finished this month. American Gods was such a great read, I need to find other stuff by Gaiman including the Sandman series. Yesterday I finished Shadow and Betrayal by Abraham, which is an omnibus edition that contains A Shadow in Summer and A Betrayal in Winter. While Shadow was okay, it seemed to meander (I think generally when Liat was the pov) in some places. Betrayal on the other hand was far better even though I knew a certain character wasn't going to die because there are two more books in The Long Price Quartet to go.

Today I started Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton, I've had this book for 20 years and attempted to read it at least twice, once when I first got it when I was 11 (originally bought it because the movie was coming out in the summer of '93) and I can't remember the other time. Obviously the first time I wasn't successful was because I was 11 and was expecting an adventure story like the movie and didn't expect all the "science stuff" as I would probably have described it back then. Well so far I'm already further along in the book than in either of my first two attempts and it's only day one.

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Read the newly (kind of) translated Mansfield Park (Jane Austen) during the holidays, I realised I remembered very little from my first read some years ago. I also realised I do not like the heroine very much.

Now switching between Wuthering Heights (Emily Bronte) which I wanted to read for some time now, but never got around to it (I was very interested at first, but then it somehow lost the appeal to me - I think the similar events are repeating just a bit too much and by now I think I realised the point that all the characters are devilish and evil :P) and the second book or The Soldier Son trilogy, Forest Mage (Robin Hobb), which I stopped reading some time last year and am now trying to get back into.

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Finished Rushdie's The Enchantress of Florence. A really wonderful novel. As Trisky said earlier, it's not quite so profound as some of Rushdie's other stuff, but more than anything else he's ever written the language here is spectacular, and the pure storytelling is unsurpassed.

Now reading Tomorrow in the Battle Think on Me by Javier Marias.

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I finished Fighting In Hell. Much of it wasn't really by Tsouras, instead it was a collection of essays on ground warfare in the Soviet Union by German Generals compiled for the US Army during the Cold War. Interesting in some ways, though obviously biased.

I'm now reading Saberhagen's venture into Fantasy, The Complete Book of Swords.

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I'm currently reading:

A Memory of Light (Robert Jordan/Brandon Sanderson) – 65 pages left.

The Name of the Wind (Patrick Rothfuss) – some 150 pages to go.

The Tyranny of the Night (Glen Cook) – 222 pages into the story.

The White Castle (Orhan Pamuk) – the Swedish translation; 95-100 pages left.

And, of course, my own soon-to-be-published-book Flammor av vrede (a literal translation would be: Flames of Wrath), which is the second installment in the epic fantasy series En saga om sorg (A Saga of Sorrow) – it's only some minor editing left (you know, the spelling and the like), that's why I'm re-reading it, again, and then it'll be released the 30th of September. Me like.

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I have a soft spot for characters with physical handicaps and yet triumph due to their wit and political/strategic skills. I love Miles Vorkosigan. I tore through The Vor Game, and now consider myself a fan of the series.

After reading Aztec, I'm curious to know more about Pre-Columbian Americas so Charles Mann's 1491 is up next.

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Where is our Unholy Consult exert, Pat? Don't make excuses like "Scott hasn't given it to me yet." We wants it.

Funny you should say that, for I emailed Scott a few days back to inquire about this. . . :)

Haven't heard back from him yet, though. . .

Patrick

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I have a soft spot for characters with physical handicaps and yet triumph due to their wit and political/strategic skills. I love Miles Vorkosigan. I tore through The Vor Game, and now consider myself a fan of the series.

After reading Aztec, I'm curious to know more about Pre-Columbian Americas so Michael Mann's 1491 is up next.

1491 is great. 1493 is less focused and therefore not as good, but still good.

I finished Guy Gavriel Kay's Under Heaven and River of Stars. I preferred the former, though the latter wasn't bad. If I were in a different mood, Kay's style probably would have really grated on me. I would have preferred a more direct follow-up to the stories of Under Heaven, which I thought were at best satisfactorily resolved and had several plot threads that could have been addressed in the same sort of same universe novel even it was not a direct sequel.

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neil gaiman's Ocean at the End of the Lane. next up World War Z. We've been listening to the Count of Monte Cristo and wonder how we ever got through it in middle school. must have been huge passages skipped, ala elven poetry in LOTR.

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Trying to listen to the Way of Shadows (Night Angel prt 1) and at 8 hrs in, I've got to give up. Does this trilogy get better? Mainly, I hate the narrator and the names are absurd which makes it really tough to listen to but I may try to give it a read if things improve. Also reading Emperor of Thorns and listening to Initiate Brother.

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