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What are you reading in August ?


AncalagonTheBlack

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Finished rereading Game of Thrones for the first time in like... a decade.

I'd lie if I said a decade, but I'm also going for my first reread since I read it back a few years ago. Truth be told, I've got my hopes up despite knowing where that particular road ends.

Also, I'm giving Neil Gaiman's Neverwhere a try. So far so good!

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I finished Broken Homes by Ben Aaronovitch on Tuesday. It was great! It's pacing is quite lackadaisical, more so than the first three books, and I can see how that is not for everybody but it gave the book a more authentic feel than most police procedurals. I wish that Aaronovitch could find a better balance between the excitement I have for the over-arching plot versus each book's individual plot line.

I'm now 82% through Be My Enemy by Ian McDonald, book two of his Everness Trilogy. Multiverse, airships, battle armor... good stuff!

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I just finished the latest Jack Reacher novel, Never Go Back.

This one is more of Jack thinking and investigating and evaluating. A good one, though, IMO. It had me from the first chapter and I finished it in two days, so it can't have been too bad.

Now onto the Grim Company, by Luke Scull.

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I just finished the latest Jack Reacher novel, Never Go Back.

This one is more of Jack thinking and investigating and evaluating. A good one, though, IMO. It had me from the first chapter and I finished it in two days, so it can't have been too bad.

Now onto the Grim Company, by Luke Scull.

My brother really likes these, but I don't really trust him (he thinks Ken Follet is great). How are they?

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Finished Tomorrow in the Battle Think on Me by Javier Marias. You really got to work for it with this novel, but it's well worth it.

Now reading Waiting for the Barbarians by J.M. Coetzee.

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My brother really likes these, but I don't really trust him (he thinks Ken Follet is great). How are they?

With Lee Child (the Reacher series) you get simplistic but entertaining stuff. Don't go looking for anything literary, but as a plane book, or a bus book or as simply a 'good yarn' then these serve.

I've never read Follett so i can't compare them.

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Finally started Shadow and Betrayal by Daniel Abraham, hurrah! :laugh: A bit of a slow start, found it a bit difficult to get invested in the characters at first, but it seems to be getting much better as it goes on.

The third book is amazing, in my opinion, and by far the best in the series for me. Most people prefer the fourth.

Either way, you're in for a treat in the next volume.

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I've had a disappointing run as far as recent reading goes. Can't seem to settle into anything. I didn't read much over vacation (shocking!!) I just finished Jonathan Coe's The Terrible Privacy of Maxwell Sim. Coe is supposed to be some big deal author, but the book left me flat. Did not care for it at all. I've just checked out the newest Neil Gaiman from the library and will start on that tonight. I hope I like it.

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Finished the First Law Trilogy, and absolutely loved it - especially the way it ended (but only after giving it a day or so to sink in). Now I'm about 100 pages into The Lies of Locke Lamora. I plan on catching up in the series before The Republic of Thieves comes out in October.

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I've been reading through the Long Price Quartet too and just started the 3rd. I didn't like the 1st one at all, but the 2nd one was worth reading and I'm looking forward to seeing what happens.

I also started Wizard's First Rule together with my husband. We're reading it out loud to each other which is quite fun but, wow, is this book poorly written. I mean I knew it was bad from the board threads but it's didn't really hit me till I actually started reading it.

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Now I'm about 100 pages into The Lies of Locke Lamora. I plan on catching up in the series before The Republic of Thieves comes out in October.

I thought The Rebublic of Thieves had already been released, so this weekend I made it my recommended purchase in the public library in my town... Now I look like an idiot. :dunce:

Oh well, I'll start reading it as soon as it gets to Gävle.

I think I'll start reading Something Wicked This Way Comes now.

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I thought The Rebublic of Thieves had already been released, so this weekend I made it my recommended purchase in the public library in my town... Now I look like an idiot. :dunce:

Oh well, I'll start reading it as soon as it gets to Gävle.

I think I'll start reading Something Wicked This Way Comes now.

Who knows, you could be right - maybe Sweden gets it before the US ;)

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I just finished reading Suldrun's Garden by Jack Vance. My first Vance novel.

Someone on Goodreads posted that "Jack Vance is the best writer that you've never heard of", and I thought more than once that such was the case here for me. This was a simple, swiftly moving, sword and sorcery tale, told with wonderful imagination, a dry wit, and lovely prose.

What magic the story describes is interwoven with a very light touch; a thing of mischief and wonder as opposed to destruction and demon curses. In one instance a young girl plots to steal the hat from the head of a faerie king so that he must grant her a wish.

At times the novel felt like a charming mash-up of A Game of Thrones and The Last Unicorn. Within Martin we recognize scheming amongst feudal Kings, an aching desire for the reunion of child and parent, and an author not squeamish about putting a beloved character to the rack if the story calls for such. From Beagle we recall the lyrical and effortless prose, archetypes from traditional Western fairy tales, and a sense that over time, if not in each given instance, good will win out over evil.

I don't see too much discussion of Vance on the threads I've read here and would love to know if others enjoy his fantasy work. I see that he predominately wrote sci-fi and mystery stuff.

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Just finished The Rathbones by Janice Clark. Picked it up on a whim at Barnes and Noble because I thought the cover art was cool and Victorian era whaling ships are awesome.

It's not what I initially expected. The summary on the book jacket made it out to be a sort of retelling of the Odyssey, much more soaked in Greek myth than it actually was. But it was still very good. The rise and fall of this strange family of folk with some knack in understanding the ocean. Lovely prose, incredibly detailed.

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I don't see too much discussion of Vance on the threads I've read here and would love to know if others enjoy his fantasy work.

The Dying Earth and its sequels The Eyes of the Overworld and Cugel's Saga are some of my all time favorites. The Dying Earth was hugely influential, Gene Wolfe's Book of the New Sun drew inspiration from Vance (the Book of Gold is supposedly The Dying Earth) as does the magic system in Dungeons & Dragons.

There were a lot people reading Vance here on the Forums right after Vance died.

I finished Fred Saberhagen's The First Book of Swords. It was a fast paced and enjoyable read, nothing too heavy. I've started on The Second Book of Swords already. Saberhagen's world is set in the far future, but the ancient gods have returned. Vulcan forged twelve magical swords to be distributed amongst mortals as part of a game the gods devised. Each sword has different properties. For instance, Coinspinner brings its wielder luck, while Stonecutter can bring down a castle wall, and Dragonslicer allows a man to kill a full grown dragon single handedly.

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