Dawn of Fyre

Arya Stark - An Unprovoked attack?

304 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, TommyJ said:

Yeah I dont think she is ever going to be capable of having a normal life!

Its better when she dies at the end of the war, cause otherwise she will probably get the most depressed winner of a war

 

Though, I so hope arya will kill LF tonight! At this moment in the story its better that she is badass

Arya dying would probably be the most realistic and reasonable way for her character arc to end. That or perhaps she decides to travel or sell her sword or something. I can't see her staying in one place or being with anyone or anything, tbh.


I think it'll be a combined Arya/Sansa killing LF but we'll see! Like, it 4 minutes.

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Sansa fed Ramsay to his own dogs. That's the most brutal execution by a Stark in the show. Is Sansa now a psychopath who deserves to die a miserable death and be forgotten about?

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On 8/25/2017 at 11:35 PM, Gaz0680 said:

Neds death and the Red Wedding were both wonderful writing from GRRM.

The fact of killing people off before their story completes is NOT bad writing, it is realistic. Lots of people die before their time, don't reach their potential or finish their story.

Ned was a critical supporting character and while he appeared as a main character POV in book 1/season 1, it was never his story. That doesn't mean the time spent reading theough Neds chapters (or Catelyns) was wasted or insignificant. Ned had a huge impact on the plot that started the story off and also was a primary influence on not just one, but several of the main characters who the story is about (Jon, Arya, Sansa, Bran). 

Unresolved arcs does not equate to bad writing.

In fact, Im pretty sure Neds arc, both in the show and books is going to remain far better writing than some of the arcs in the show that DO get resolved. 

The entire winterfell plot is horrendous writing period...and Arya (my favourite character) is acting in a way that doesnt make sense for her character purely because of horrible writing.

All of your comment is being based on an unstated method of determining what constitutes "bad writing" and as such, your comments fall into the realm of pure subjectivism which doesn't really facilitate any kind of reasonable dialogue. If there is no objective measuring criteria for judging what is and what is not "bad writing" then no writing is justifiably judged as either good or bad; but is simply a matter of subjective taste. In other words it's analogically the same as saying "Red is a bad color, but blue is good" without qualification of judgment criteria. It becomes a statement with no fundamental meaning, and is the same as saying nothing at all.

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On 8/25/2017 at 9:54 PM, falcotron said:

You're right that GRRM has definitely broken one of the standard rules for this kind of fiction. But you can't just call that bad writing. If you were teaching a freshman composition class and one of your students did it, then yes, it would be bad writing.

Bear in mind that what I was attempting to do was understand the criteria people are using to determine in some manner approaching objectivity what constitutes "bad/good writing" - I established criteria which I was using to justifiably determine the difference in a way that isn't pure subjectivism.

If all anyone is doing is saying "This writing is good and that writing is bad, because I like that and I don't like the other" then they are saying nothing of meaning, and are only declaring opinions based on nothing by subjective criteria which are neither true nor false (relatively speaking) and which subsequently cause their comments and judgment to contain the same state of being neither A nor B. Thus their words become objectively meaningless, and empty of both reason and relevance.

What I mean is, what music do you like, and what music do you not like? If your criteria for "That is good music and that is bad music" based on the criteria "I do not like the former, and do like the latter" then you're no longer actually reasonably discussing things, but are engaging in telling people your own personal likes and dislikes, which things are fine to say if a person is asking what you like and dislike; but in an actual dialogue concerning judgment of something like writing (whether story or music) your opinions are irrelevant and meaningless.

Otherwise, most people in the world do not like fantasy stories; does that then make fantasy stories "bad writing" by virtue of an enjoyment not equal to the majority of people? Do you see what I am saying?

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